Brooklyn Boro

July 1: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

July 1, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1846, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle said, “Yes, the anniversary of American independence is close upon us; and we hope (and feel pretty confident) that it will be commemorated in Brooklyn, with a goodly and patriotic spirit! The military companies are to turn out, and, under the management of the popular Gen. Duryea, the Chief Marshal, we feel sure that the turnout will be large, and well arranged. Also the civic societies of Brooklyn, and its trades and professions, will doubtless be represented in the procession, and on Fort Greene. The selection of the latter place was a most happy one! So closely identified with revolutionary reminiscences — identified with the Battle of Long Island, the first battle where Washington took command of the American army in person — the hundreds of martyrs from the Old Jersey Prison ship, and from the British prisons in New York , who were buried at the very base of the bill — is it not indeed the place of places, for a celebration of the 4th of July?”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1863, the Eagle reported, “The Army of the Potomac, under its new commander, has advanced into Pennsylvania, with the purpose of offering battle to the invader. Lee is concentrating his forces with a view of accepting the challenge. The conflict cannot be long delayed, and can hardly fail to rank among the decisive battles of history. The rebels are advancing under a General in whom they have every confidence, and who is allowed to be, by friend and foe, a great military captain. Our army, about equal in numbers to that of the enemy, is led by a General conceded to be brave and energetic, but who has never before had the command of an army which to manage would task the capacity of the greatest military genius. While we are permitted to hope and pray for the best, it is our duty to prepare for and guard against the worst. The main object of Lee’s movements is the discomfiture and destruction of the Army of the Potomac. That once effected, there is no adequate barrier between him and Philadelphia on the one side and Baltimore on the other.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1876, the Eagle reported, “The Committee of the Board of Aldermen entrusted with the duty of making preparations for the proper celebration of the Centennial Anniversary of the National Independence are drawing to the close of their labors. Alderman Fisher, the Chairman of the Committee, has devoted almost the whole of his time for the last week to perfecting the arrangements, and if any mishaps should occur it will not be for want of attention on his part. In Wednesday’s Eagle was published the full text of General Jourdan’s order for the parade on the evening of the 3rd, and there are no changes to report, with the exception that such societies as did not report in time will be assigned a position on the left of the line. It is important that all who intend taking part in the parade should bear in mind that the procession will start at eight o’clock precisely. Those who are not ready to move at that hour will not be allowed to fall in at any time, for the reason that great confusion would thereby be created.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the South Brooklyn Home Talk reported, “The ‘Glorious Fourth’ is to be celebrated in the Bay Ridge and Fort Hamilton districts Saturday in a manner befitting the day. Of course it is to be of the ‘safe and sane’ variety, and while there, no doubt, will be an absence of the customary shooting off of cannon crackers and torpedoes, the spirit of the day will be carried out in an enthusiastic and patriotic manner. At Public School No. 94, Sixth avenue and Fiftieth street, patriotic exercises are to be held in the morning and exercises of a similar character are to be held at the same time at Public School No. 140, Fourth avenue and Sixtieth street. All the pupils are expected to be in attendance, and a large number of parents and friends will witness the exercises. The big celebrations of the day, however, will be held at Sunset and McKinley Parks. There is to be an afternoon band concert at Sunset Park at 2 o’clock, and in the evening, at 8 o’clock, there will be another concert. While the city has not provided funds for a display of fireworks, there will be an illuminating display which will prove interesting to all. Professor Isidore Kraskin is to be in charge of the music, and a very pleasing programme has been arranged.”

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Chloe Bailey
Chris Pizzello/AP
Debbie Harry
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “An American in Paris” star Leslie Caron, who was born in 1931; “M*A*S*H” star Jamie Farr, who was born in 1934; Famous Amos founder Wally Amos, who was born in 1936; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Debbie Harry (Blondie), who was born in 1945; original “Saturday Night Live” star Dan Aykroyd, who was born in 1952; “Shame” singer Evelyn “Champagne” King, who was born in 1960; Faith No More co-founder Roddy Bottum, who was born in 1963; “Baywatch” star Pamela Anderson, who was born in 1967; rapper and producer Missy Elliott, who was born in 1971; “One Tree Hill” star Hilarie Burton, who was born in 1982; “Have Mercy” singer Chloe Bailey, who was born in 1998; and “It” star Chosen Jacobs, who was born in 2001.

Dan Aykroyd
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

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STAMP OF APPROVAL: The U.S. Postal Service issued its first stamps on this day in 1847, honoring Benjamin Franklin on the five-cent stamp and George Washington on the 10-cent stamp. Stamps had been issued by private postal services in the U.S. prior to this date.

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LIVE FROM NEW YORK: The first scheduled TV broadcast took place on this day in 1941 when NBC broadcast its signal from the Empire State Building. The FCC granted the first commercial TV licenses to 10 stations on May 2, 1941.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The past, the present and the future are really one: they are today.”

— author Harriet Beecher Stowe, who died on this day in 1896


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