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June 30: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 30, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The nation’s stars and stripes will be rearranged and born anew on the Fourth of July. The United States will upon that day throw out to the breeze as its official flag the world around a banner that has never been seen before. The occasion for this is the admission of two new States, Arizona and New Mexico, into the Union. This necessitates the addition of two new stars to the flag and so it becomes necessary to make over the old banner in accordance with the enlarged Union. As the nation was born on the Fourth of July, so has it become the custom to make that date the birthday of the new flags. Whenever, during the past century, a State has been admitted into the Union,  a new flag with the rearrangement of stars has been born on the Fourth of July that followed. The flag that has been official since July 4, 1907, following the admission of Oklahoma, will next Thursday be out of date. Instead of that banner with its forty-six stars arranged in irregular lines there will appear the new flag with its block of stars in six lines of eight stars each.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1915, the Eagle reported, “PHILADELPHIA — Preliminary tests of the specially built steel flat car on which the Liberty Bell will be transported across the continent to the California expositions were completed today. Traveling at the rate of fifty-five miles an hour over a network of switches in a local freight yard, a glass filled with water was placed on the floor of the car, and not a drop was spilled. The car is of all-steel construction, capable of carrying a weight of more than 100,000 pounds. An electrical generator, installed beneath the platform, operated by the axle, will charge the batteries for the hundreds of incandescent lamps with which the bell will be illuminated during the nights on the journey.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1921, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Although official information is withheld, some of President Harding’s closest advisers expect him to nominate former President Taft for Chief Justice of the United States in the very near future. In some quarters it is believed that official announcement of the selection of Mr. Taft might be made today. There are many considerations entering into the choice, however, and among other officials high in the Administration, the belief prevailed that no nomination would go in until after the Fourth of July recess of Congress. All recent indications have pointed to the former President as Mr. Harding’s probable choice, but no nomination had been signed by the President early today.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “Brooklyn yesterday saw one civic triumph completed and another assured as Mayor LaGuardia, at ceremonies opening the new Belt Parkway, announced that the Federal loan for construction of the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel had been approved. The Mayor’s announcement about the tunnel came as a delightful surprise to the crowd gathered at Owl’s Head Park to witness the opening of the super-highway which skirts Brooklyn and Queens and connects with marginal arteries of the Bronx, Westchester and Manhattan and the crossings into New Jersey. The parkway stretches for 35 miles and was constructed in 18 months at a cost of $35,000,000. A short stretch in Sheepshead Bay is nearing completion by the Triborough Bridge Authority. The Mayor held his surprise announcement until the close of his address, declaring that he considered it a most fitting climax to the parkway opening ceremonies. Final approval of the tunnel loan came from Jesse H. Jones, head of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, in a telegram yesterday to the Mayor. The way is now clear, the Mayor said, to start work on the tunnel, since the Board of Estimate has been authorized to acquire the land needed for the shaft and corporation counsel instructed to invest title at the earliest possible moment. Thus, he explained, the city and Federal Government ‘will complete the parkway and soon start digging the tunnel.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “Tomorrow is D-Day — D for dime — when the new 10-cent subway fare goes into effect, and Mayor O’Dwyer came back today from a Puerto Rico vacation to supervise the changeover from the traditional and once sacrosanct five-cent fare. He arrived in LaGuardia Field, at 6:22 a.m., and later in the City conferred with the Board of Transportation officials and with Police Commissioner Wallender and announced that both city departments ‘have done an excellent job of planning’ for the transit D-Day.”

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David Alan Grier
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Ron Swoboda
Frank Franklin II/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Too Close for Comfort” star Nancy Dussault, who was born in 1936; N.Y. Mets World Series hero Ron Swoboda, who was born in 1944; “Married … With Children” star David Garrison, who was born in 1952; “In Living Color” star David Alan Grier, who was born in 1956; “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” star Vincent D’Onofrio, who was born in Brooklyn in 1959; guitar legend Yngwie Malmsteen, who was born in 1963; International Boxing Hall of Famer Mike Tyson, who was born in Brooklyn in 1966; “Along Came a Spider” star Monica Potter, who was born in 1971; “Castle Rock” star Lizzy Caplan, who was born in 1982; “American Idol” champion Fantasia Barrino, who was born in 1984; and Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer Michael Phelps, who was born in 1985.

Lizzy Caplan
Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP

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LEADING LADY: Lena Horne was born on this day in 1917. The Bedford-Stuyvesant native began singing with the chorus line at the Cotton Club in Harlem at age 16. A career on Broadway and in Hollywood followed in rapid succession and she soon became the symbol for African-American actors and singers trying to break the color barrier. She found success with both black and white audiences, although she did face her share of racial prejudice. She died in 2010. A forever stamp depicting her was issued in 2018.

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HERE AND NOW: The National Organization for Women was founded in Washington, D.C., on this day in 1966 by attendees of the Third National Conference on the Commission on the Status of Women. NOW’s purpose is to take action to bring women into full partnership in the mainstream of American society, exercising all privileges and responsibilities in equal partnership with men.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“It’s so nice to get flowers while you can still smell the fragrance.”

— singer Lena Horne, who was born in Brooklyn on this day in 1917


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