Brooklyn Boro

June 29: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 29, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “CONVENTION HALL, HOUSTON — Gov. Alfred E. Smith will make his fight for the presidency largely on the Prohibition issue. The governor today sent an acceptance telegram to Senator [Joseph] Robinson, chairman of the convention, to be read to the convention after the balloting for vice president has been completed later in the day … Governor Smith’s first public appearance after his nomination was a brief speech from his doorstep to friends and neighbors gathered on the lawn of the Executive Mansion early this morning. ‘The returns on the radio from Texas,’ he said, ‘indicate that New York State, myself, my family and all of my friends are greatly honored by the confidence placed in me by an overwhelming majority of the delegates … I am overwhelmed by the news and my heart is where my palate ought to be.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The United States is stepping up in arms shipments to Western Europe and other free nations in an effort to be ready for any new trouble with Soviet Russia, it was disclosed today. Although no one knew definitely that the Russians and their satellites are planning any operations outside of Korea, one key official told newsmen: ‘We are aware that the event in Korea may be just one of a series of unpleasant things if we let our guard down.’ Disclosure by State and Defense Department sources that the arms aid shipments have been stepped up since the South Korean invasion underscored intelligence reports that a major ‘war of nerves’ is boiling in Eastern Europe. According to these reports, Soviet ships and planes in substantial force are maneuvering in the Black Sea, uncomfortably close to friendly Turkey, and Soviet satellite armies and air forces also have expanded their operations. In an effort to bolster U.S. military strength in Europe, some high ranking military officers were seeking to swing Congress behind new moves to bring Spain and Western Germany into Western defense orbit. President Truman and Secretary of State Dean Acheson had another opportunity today to report directly to the American people on the status of the cold war with Russia and on the Administration’s decision to intervene in the Korean War under United Nations authority. Mr. Truman scheduled a news conference late today while Acheson was slated to address the national convention of the American Newspaper Guild.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “The Dodgers and Giants match base hits instead of headlines tonight in the opener of a three-game set at the Polo Grounds, about as ‘crucial’ as any series can be at this stage of the National League pennant race. The Giants are in first place by a game. So the Dodgers must win two of the three to tie and must sweep to take over first place. A crowd of 45,000 fans is expected to cheer and jeer the interboro rivals, who split their first six games this season. Don Newcombe is the Dodger starting pitcher against Sal Maglie, the antique nemesis who holds a 20-7 lifetime record over the Dodger sluggers. At least Maglie is the most likely starter despite Leo Durocher’s sinister smiles that he won’t pick his pitcher until just before the 8:15 p.m. gametime. The Giant manager apparently has a ‘sleeper’ choice — Ramon Monzant, a 21-year-old Puerto Rican righthander recalled from Minneapolis last Saturday. But it’s hard to believe Durocher would gamble with the Barber ready and rested. The Dodgers also plan to introduce two rookies tonight, at least on the scorecard if not in the box score — righthander Pete Wojey and outfielder Walt Moryn, brought up yesterday as pennant-race reinforcements.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1957, the Bay Ridge Home Reporter said, “The U.S. Army snafued local efforts to further stall the Narrows Bridge by signing an involved land swap while Commissioner Robert Moses — who has had to overcome many obstacles in his drive for the hated bridge — stood quietly in the shadows. Army Secretary Wilbur M. Brucker inked the contract for the land trade shortly before the War Power Act, which gave him power to do so, ran out. Local bridge opponents, organized under J. Gerald Shea, leader of the Save Bay Ridge Committee, had carried their appeal all the way to the President in an effort to block the agreement. Terms of the deal, the Home Reporter learned, involve the yielding of some 37 acres in Fort Hamilton military reservation by the Army, in exchange for the lease of eleven acres in Dyker Beach Park, inasmuch as Bay Ridge is directly affected. Other parts of the pact involve real estate in Staten Island, Nassau and Orange County, N.J. The Army furthermore, it is reported, will be the recipient of 107 buildings to be erected by the Port of New York Authority and the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority. The new buildings would replace 208 buildings the Army has agreed to sacrifice for the bridge. The SBRC group charge in its appeal to the President said the Army was overstepping its legal powers when it considered leasing arrangements with the city for 99 years. This is, in effect, a sale or permanent transfer, the committee argued, and therefore should require Congressional approval.”

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Nicole Scherzinger
Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP
Maria Conchita Alonso
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Lethal Weapon” star Gary Busey, who was born in 1944; “The Love Boat” star and former U.S. Rep. Fred Grandy, who was born in 1948; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Ian Paice (Deep Purple), who was born in 1948; “Alone Again” singer Don Dokken, who was born in 1953; Men at Work founder Colin Hay, who was born in 1953; “Moscow on the Hudson” star Maria Conchita Alonso, who was born in 1957; “NYPD Blue” star Sharon Lawrence, who was born in 1961; “Lost” star Zuleikha Robinson, who was born in 1977; Pussycat Dolls singer Nicole Scherzinger, who was born in 1978; “American Horror Story” star Lily Rabe, who was born in 1982; L.A. Clippers forward Kawhi Leonard, who was born in 1991; and “Riverdale” star Camila Mendes, who was born in 1994.

Lily Rabe
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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BY GEORGE: George Washington Goethals was born in Brooklyn on this day in 1858. The engineer and Army officer led the construction of the Panama Canal and was the first civil governor of the Canal Zone. The Goethals Bridge between Staten Island and New Jersey is named for him. He died in 1928.

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MONSTER-SIZED TALENT: Ray Harryhausen was born on this day in 1920. The special effects wizard perfected the stop-motion animation he learned from mentor William O’Brien and created what he called “Dynamation.” He thrilled moviegoers in the 1950s and ’60s with realistic, rampaging monsters and alarming skeletal warriors in such films as “The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms,” “The 7th Voyage of Sinbad” and “Jason and the Argonauts.” He died in 2013.

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GET YOUR MOTOR RUNNIN’: The Interstate highway system was established on this day in 1956 when President Dwight Eisenhower signed a bill providing $33.5 billion for its construction. It was the biggest public works program in history.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Knowledge of our duties is the most essential part of the philosophy of life. If you escape duty, you avoid action. The world demands results.”

— engineer George Washington Goethals, who was born on this day in 1858


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