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June 28: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 28, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1892, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle said, “The art of the canvass, so far, appears to comprise variations on the fact that [Grover] Cleveland is a fat man and [Benjamin] Harrison a short one. The first representation has its origin in malignity. It is having its revel in imbecility. The second representation had its origin in good nature. It had a progress in malice, but it has got out of that and has reacted on its authors. Republicans do not any more object to the use of the enormous head covering called ‘grandfather’s hat’ by the Democrats for the purposes of caricature. The Republicans have ‘adopted the hat,’ which a sincere but unlettered editor of their number calls ‘the grand old party’s gonfalon.’ The Democrats would be quite as satisfied, had they never topically or pictorially touched that antique ‘tile.’ The Eagle believes that the Republicans will yet be sorry that they committed themselves to corpulence as a property in caricature, as sorry as the Democrats are for overworking the ‘hat.’ Americans like fair play. They like fun, too; but they turn the tables on malice.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1916, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — President Wilson is ready to go before Congress tomorrow and make a statement on the Mexican situation. While his address is not in final form, it is known that Mr. Wilson has prepared the essential parts of it. It is known that the president has under consideration a plan to establish a police zone in northern Mexico, for the purpose of safeguarding the border and effectually preventing attacks upon American towns in Texas, Arizona and New Mexico. There is no intention at this time of asking Congress for a declaration of war, but the president may ask that Congress give its approval to the employment of military forces of the United States in establishing a police zone. That [President Venustiano] Carranza will submit to such a scheme is not believed here. Therefore, if a police zone is established and occupied by American troops, the ultimate effect will, in the opinion of military authorities here, be a series of clashes with Mexican troops, which will eventually lead to wholesale warfare between the two countries.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “CONVENTION HALL, MADISON SQUARE GARDEN — Until the Democratic Convention today has disposed of the Ku-Klux Klan issue and decided whether or not the platform is to denounce the Klan by name or merely assail all secret organizations, it is idle to talk of candidates for the Presidential nomination. The status of every candidate in the field will be affected by the manner in which the platform deals with the Klan. If Governor [Al] Smith has a fighting chance — and there are many who believe he hasn’t — it is because his nomination would be tantamount to pointing out the Klan by name. In other words, the platform might say simply that the Democratic party is opposed to all secret organizations. Such a platform would hardly be satisfactory to those who are clamoring for a denunciation plank today, but if Smith were chosen to run on such a platform the attitude of the party toward the Klan would be unmistakable, even without a denunciation plank.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “PITTSFIELD, MASS., JUNE 27 (U.P.) — Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands, who is spending the Summer at Lee, replenished her wardrobe at a department store here today. The shopping trip was supposed to be secret but news cameramen who gathered outside the store soon became the nucleus of a crowd of curious and Secret Service operatives had to clear a path for the Queen.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “PITTSBURGH (U.P.) — The nation’s 400,000 soft coal miners started a 10-day vacation today and U.S. Steel Corporation announced immediate layoffs for 10,000 workers because of reduced operations in fuel-starved steel mills. ‘Big Steel’ said 80 of its 130 open hearth steel furnaces in the Pittsburgh-Youngtown area were forced to close because of depleted coal supplies. Ten additional iron-making blast furnaces in the district were banked. The corporation previously had banked 4½ because of the wildcat pre-vacation strikes which hit the coal fields this week. Coke production at the big Clairton byproducts plant was cut to 38 percent of capacity. Operations of U.S. Steel’s largest operating subsidiary, the Carnegie-Illinois Steel, were slashed to 45 percent of normal in the area. Other steel companies also were cutting production drastically. Railroads were beginning to feel the pinch of the coal shutdown. Crewmen faced reduced working schedules. The steel cutbacks will force early curtailment in operations of fabricating and finishing plants. More than 250,000 United Mine Workers (A.F.L.) already were out in protest against the Taft Hartley labor law before the vacation period began at midnight. They began to leave work last Monday and depleted coal piles forced cutbacks in steel output almost immediately. The big question now was whether miners would return to work on July 8. Sentiment in the coal fields was reported growing for a strike if no contract with the operators has been completed by that time. The traditional U.M.W. policy is ‘no contract, no work.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, Eagle sports columnist Tommy Holmes said, “One of life’s little mysteries is how the Dodgers managed to outdraw the Giants last week by almost 2 to 1 with all that ballyhoo about Leo Durocher’s miracles and everybody, including the Ebbets Field p.a. orator, talking about Willie Mays … That strictly professional book at Las Vegas established the Giants as favorites over the Dodgers, too — which is nothing conclusive, of course, yet should serve as a warning against complacency … So far there has been no indication that the Brooklyn players do not know what they’re up against … Sixteen games of hand-to-hand competition remain in the interborough series and it’s a fair guess that the club’s winning the majority of these will win the pennant … The three at the Polo Grounds — starting with a night game tomorrow — and the three at Ebbets Field next week could be vital.”

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Kathy Bates
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Mel Brooks
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Oscar-winning filmmaker Mel Brooks, who was born in Brooklyn in 1926; Super Bowl V MVP Chuck Howley, who was born in 1936; actor and impressionist John Byner, who was born in 1938; former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, who was born in 1938; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher Al Downing, who was born in 1941; “X-Men” star Bruce Davison, who was born in 1946; Oscar-winning actress Kathy Bates, who was born in 1948; “Star Trek: First Contact” star Alice Krige, who was born in 1954; Pro Football Hall of Famer John Elway, who was born in 1960; former major league first baseman Mark Grace, who was born in 1964; “Some Kind of Wonderful” star Mary Stuart Masterson, who was born in 1966; “Ally McBeal” star Gil Bellows, who was born in 1967; “All in the Family” star Danielle Brisebois, who was born in Brooklyn in 1969; entrepreneur Elon Musk, who was born in 1971; singer and actress Kellie Pickler, who was born in 1986; and Phoenix Suns guard Bradley Beal, who was born in 1993.

Elon Musk
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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A WORLD IN CRISIS: Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo on this day in 1914. The assassination is considered the immediate cause of World War I. The Treaty of Versailles, which ended the war, was signed in 1919 on the fifth anniversary of their deaths.

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FIGHTING BACK: The Stonewall riot began on this day in 1969. Early in the morning, the clientele of a Manhattan gay bar, the Stonewall Inn, rioted after the club was raided by police. The riot was followed by several days of demonstrations. It is recognized today as the start of the gay liberation movement.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Humor is just another defense against the universe.”

— filmmaker Mel Brooks, who was born on this day in 1926


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