Brooklyn Boro

June 26: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 26, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1878, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Yesterday was Class Day at Yale, Amherst and Vassar. There were 169 applicants at Harvard for degrees, and it is said all but fifteen will get them. The closing exercises at Yale College began yesterday, and the orator was William Howard Taft, of Cincinnati. The poet of the day was also from Cincinnati — Mr. H.C. Coe.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Eagle reported, “Two election bets were registered at the Union League Club yesterday. One was $100 against $1,000 that Mr. Taft would not carry a single State in November. The man taking the long end then bet $100 against $150 that Mr. Roosevelt would have as many electoral votes as Mr. Taft.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “Josh Gibson, heavy hitting colored catcher, hit three home runs in the second game as the Pittsburgh Crawfords humbled the Farmers twice at Farmers Oval yesterday, 12 to 4 and 13 to 3. It brought Gibson’s total to 37 for the season. Every player in the Crawfords’ lineup hit safely in each game, the victors pounding out 33 hits for the day’s work.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “ALLLIED SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, LONDON (U.P.) — The final battle of Cherbourg reached the mop-up stage today as American forces weeded out isolated nests of German resistance in street fighting of greatly reduced intensity after seizing the entire eastern part of the city and smashing straight through its heart to the waterfront. Cherbourg is not yet fully and officially occupied, supreme headquarters reported late today, but all attacking United States divisions have advanced their forward elements deep into the city.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON, JUNE 25 — Vaccination ‘offers more hope of protection against influenza’ than inhalations of blood serum from persons recovered from the disease, army experiments upon conscientious objector volunteers have demonstrated. The War Department announcement, issued today, tells of a report on influenza made by Dr. Francis G. Blake of Yale University, president of the Board for the Investigation and Control of Influenza and other Epidemic Diseases in the Army, to the Preventive Medicine Service of the Office of the Surgeon General. It covered studies made on conscientious objectors in Michigan by Dr. Thomas Francis Jr. and Dr. Jonas E. Salk of the University of Michigan, Dr. Paul R. Cannon, Dr. Francis B. Gordon and Dr. Clayton G. Loosli, now Captain Loosli, of the University of Chicago. Other investigators had reported that inhaling sprayed blood serum from persons recovered from influenza would protect against the disease. The experts working for the army found that it did not do so in their experiments.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “SEOUL (U.P.) — Tank-led North Korean Communist armies drove to within four miles of this capital city of South Korea early today and reports from the front said Republican defense forces were able to put up ‘almost no resistance.’ … The U.S. Army in Japan canceled some of its flights to Seoul today because of the ‘deteriorating situation’ there. The cancellation suggested the Kimpo Air Field outside Seoul might have fallen to the Communists … The South Korean Cabinet went into emergency session amid rumors that the capital may be moved — possibly to Kwongju in the southwestern part of the U.S.-sponsored republic. … The breakthrough was at Uijongbu, 17 miles north of Seoul, about 5:20 p.m., with an undetermined number of tanks spearheading the advance of the Communist striking force. South Korean soldiers, armed only with rifles and light machine-guns, were unable to stop the lumbering armored vehicles.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “Willie Mays’ 24th homer, an inside-the-park wallop with one on, sparked the New York Giants to a 6-2 victory last night over the skidding Chicago Cubs, who suffered their eighth straight setback. The victory, credited to Jim Hearn although he gave way to screwballer Marv Grissom in the eighth, preserved the Giants’ slim, one-game lead over the Dodgers in the neck-and-neck National League pennant race. Big Bob Rush started for the Cubs, gave up seven of the Giants’ 11 hits in the four frames he worked and was charged with his eighth defeat. Hank Thompson started Rush on his downfall with a double to lead off the second inning. For the fifth game in a row, Mays then hit a home run on his first trip to the plate. Mays’ smash landed deep in the Chicago bullpen and he sped around the bases behind Thompson before the ball could be relayed to the plate. It marked his sixth four-bagger in the last five games.”

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Ariana Grande
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Derek Jeter
Bebeto Matthews/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include 5th Dimension co-founder Billy Davis, Jr., who was born in 1938; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Mick Jones (The Clash), who was born in 1955; “Gung Ho” star Gedde Watanabe, who was born in 1955; “Wicked Game” singer Chris Isaak, who was born in 1956; Scandal singer Patty Smyth, who was born in 1957; “The Kids in the Hall” star Mark McKinney, who was born in 1959; U.S. Bicycling Hall of Famer Greg LeMond, who was born in 1961; “Boogie Nights” director Paul Thomas Anderson, who was born in 1970; “Will & Grace” star Sean Hayes, who was born in 1970; “Here for the Party” singer Gretchen Wilson, who was born in 1973; N.Y. Yankees legend and Baseball Hall of Famer Derek Jeter, who was born in 1974; “Parks and Recreation” star Aubrey Plaza, who was born in 1984; and “No Tears Left to Cry” singer Ariana Grande, who was born in 1993.

Sean Hayes
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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RAISING THE BAR: The bar code was introduced on this day in 1974. A committee formed in 1970 by U.S. grocers and food manufacturers recommended in 1973 a Universal Product Code for supermarket items that would allow electronic scanning of prices. The first item to be scanned was a pack of Wrigley’s gum. Today bar codes are used to keep track of everything from freight cars to cattle.

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THIS IS US: On this day in 2000, biologists J. Craig Venter and Francis S. Collins announced that their research groups had mapped the human genome, a strand of DNA with three billion parts that spell out our genetic code.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“I love it when people doubt me. It makes me work harder to prove them wrong.”

— N.Y. Yankees legend Derek Jeter, who was born on this day in 1974


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