Brooklyn Boro

June 23: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 23, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1864, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The match between the Young American Cricketers and the Philadelphia Club and the veterans of the New York Club was commenced yesterday morning on the Bedford cricket grounds, and, as was anticipated, the contest proved to be one of the most interesting displays of cricket, in all the departments of the game, that has been seen in this vicinity for years past. The weather was favorable in the extreme, and the attendance more numerous even than that of the previous match, the utmost interest being manifested in regard to the result. The New York Club presented one of its strongest elevens on the occasion, though not stronger than the previous one in the Newark match. The Philadelphians too had a good representation on hand, about the best in fact we ever saw them present. Their professional, Sanior, was with them, but though he  batted in the first innings he was unable to aid them with his bowling, owing to sickness, so that the eleven against the New Yorkers in the field were all Americans, and a fine display they made in the way of their specialty of fielding.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1866, the Eagle reported, “Elias Howe, Jr., says that he shall not apply for an extension of his sewing-machine patent, which expires this year, as he has already made a million and a half dollars on it, and thinks that is enough.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1902, the Eagle reported, “RONKONKOMA, L.I. — It was but three weeks ago that the seventeen year locusts appeared at this place in their present visitation to Long Island and, according to the experience of other visitations of the insects, in another three weeks the last of them will have emerged from the ground. The field of operations of locusts this year has been in the eastern portions of Islip and Smithtown and western Brookhaven townships, running in a belt completely across the island from Patchogue to Setauket. On the announcement that the advance guard had appeared there was immediate apprehension by the inhabitants of those districts of devastated crops and foliage, but it proved to be groundless, however, because there is no indication that the locusts eat anything at all. They fly hither and thither, the concert of the males in the humming of the drums under their wings making a noise distressing to the ear and almost deafening while daylight continues.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “ALLIED SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, LONDON (U.P.) — American shock troops battled their way closer to the Cherbourg Harbor and heart of the city today in the most violent fighting of the Normandy campaign, and victory appeared near, with some possibility that the port might already be in Allied hands. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s headquarters, hopeful that Cherbourg would fall at any time, revealed that the Americans had captured one of three main terrain features dominating the port as long ago as last midnight. Field dispatches from the outskirts of Cherbourg filed as the final assault on the city roared through its second day said the United States units had hacked their way forward at bayonet point more than a mile into the German fortifications blockading the southern gates of the city. Other ‘big bangs’ are being prepared coincident with the final drive to capture Cherbourg, it was revealed at headquarters, but where and when these will fall is known only to the Supreme Allied Command.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “Pinch-hitter Monte Irvin singled with the bases filled and two out in the ninth inning last night to give the New York Giants one of their patented come-from-behind victories over the Milwaukee Braves, 3-2, and extend their National League lead to two full games. Irvin, benched only a few days ago after going 26 consecutive times without a hit, delivered the winning blow off rookie Gene Conley’s first pitch to him. The hit climaxed a dramatic ninth-inning rally after Conley had limited the Giants to six hits for the first eight innings. Whitey Lockman walked to open the inning, moved to second on a sacrifice and to third on Don Mueller’s single. He scored the tying run when Willie Mays, who hit his 21st homer in the second inning, dropped a double into short right field. Pinch-hitter Bobby Hofman was purposely passed to load the bases and Conley then struck out pinch-hitter Hoot Evers. Manager Leo Durocher, after delaying the game for almost three minutes before deciding on his pinch-hitter, eventually selected Irvin, and the erstwhile regular Giant left-fielder came through with the winning blow. The victory, the Giants’ fourth straight and 10th in their last 11 games, went to knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm, who pitched the top of the ninth. It was his fifth victory of the season compared to two defeats.”

***

Randy Jackson
Wally Santana/AP
Selma Blair
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Jonathan Livingston Seagull” author Richard Bach, who was born in 1936; “Knots Landing” star Ted Shackelford, who was born in 1946; U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, who was born in 1948; Misfits founder Glenn Danzig, who was born in 1955; Journey bassist and former “American Idol” judge Randy Jackson, who was born in 1956; Oscar-winning actress Frances McDormand, who was born in 1957; “Cruel Intentions” star Selma Blair, who was born in 1972; “I’m Yours” singer Jason Mraz, who was born in 1977; former N.Y. Giants center Shaun O’Hara, who was born in 1977; Pro Football Hall of Famer LaDainian Tomlinson, who was born in 1979; “The Big Bang Theory” star Melissa Rauch, who was born in 1980; and Miami Marlins shortstop Tim Anderson, who was born in 1993.

Clarence Thomas
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

***

CASH AND PRIZES: June Carter Cash was born on this day in 1929. As a member of the Carter Family — a group that included her mother, sisters and cousins — she toured as a performer from childhood. She met Johnny Cash on the road in 1961 and cowrote his hit song “Ring of Fire.” They married in 1968 and won two Grammys for their duets. They both died in 2003.

***

GOLD STANDARD: Wilma Rudolph was born on this day in 1940. The Tennessee native won the 100-, 200- and 400-meter relays at the 1960 Rome games, becoming the first woman to win three gold medals at the same Olympics. She overcame polio as a child and won the 1961 Sullivan Award as the most outstanding amateur athlete in the U.S. She died in 1994.

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The triumph can’t be had without the struggle.”

— Olympic champion Wilma Rudolph, who was born on this day in 1940


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment