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June 20: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 20, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1856, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “NEW YORK — The ‘Anti-Fillmore’ Convention assembled this morning at the Apollo Rooms, Mr. Richmond, of Mass., in the chair. Hon. Mr. Allen, of Mass., said he was authorized to withdraw the name of Mr. Banks as their candidate for President, and would nominate in his stead a man whom Mr. Banks recommends, John C. Fremont. He moved the adoption by acclamation of John C. Fremont and William F. Johnson, as the American candidates for President and Vice President. The motion was advocated by Mr. Mott, of New York, Ford of Ohio, Waterbury of New York, Baker of Mass., and Perkins of Connecticut, and adopted without a dissenting voice. A National Executive Committee was selected by the delegates — one from each State, and a Committee of five appointed by the chair to draft an address to the American people.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1865, the Eagle reported, “A short time since there was a movement made to take up a subscription to present the family of Abraham Lincoln with $100,000, it being represented that the late President left his family but poorly provided for. Last week letters of administration were issued on his estate, the value of which is now estimated at $75,000.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1878, the Eagle reported, “The centennial celebration of the evacuation of Valley Forge by the Continental Army was celebrated at Valley Forge, Pa., yesterday. Throughout the Schuylkill Valley there was a general celebration. Governor Hartranft, General Hancock and others took part in the memorial services, and then headed the procession, which consisted of military, bands of music, civic societies and young ladies dressed in white. The graves of Continental and Federal soldiers were decorated, and the procession then moved over the intrenchments, which have remained since the occupation of the place by the Continental Army, and over the historic ground, which was strewn with flowers by the ladies. A chorus of 300 voices rendered an anthem, and afterward there was a review of the military. At noon a salute of thirty-eight guns was fired, and Governor Hartranft delivered an address, listened to by 15,000 persons. Poems and orations followed, and at four o’clock a benediction was pronounced and the great throng dispersed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1885, the Eagle said, “Hon. ‘Teddy’ Roosevelt is still scattering the seeds of New York civilization among the Dakota cow boys.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO — After twenty-four hours of the most sensational developments, the Republican Party is still intact. Roosevelt has not bolted. Unless concessions are made by the Taft machine, which still maintains its control of the situation, Roosevelt will organize a new political party. The chief points in a very complicated situation, charged with dynamite, are as follows: The Crane-Root-Penrose combination, which controls the Convention, is straining every nerve to avert the smashing of the party. President Taft has been dropped as a possibility, so far as being the nominee is concerned. Governor Hadley is the most likely compromise candidate, and the Crane element has opened negotiations with the radicals looking to his selection. There will be a Roosevelt bolt and a new party formed unless the seventy-two ‘stolen goods’ are dropped from the roll. The conservative Roosevelt men are deserting him by wholesale under his threat to bolt. The sensational bolt has not occurred. It got a false start last night and everybody supposed that the match  had been touched to the dynamite. When the Colonel, with rage and excitement, phoned word for his men to leave the credentials committee room at midnight last night, the word went out at last the G.O.P. had been split in twain. The Taft crowd got badly frightened when they saw the Roosevelt men leaving and hastily retracted. They took the time limit off of the discussion of the contested delegates. They hurried this word to the Colonel, but not until this morning did the Rough Rider agree to let his men go back and fight it out.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Airplanes and military, with ships and food, Major General Goethals today told the Senate Military Sub-Committee, will be the principal factors in winning the war. Supporting bills to the creation of a new department of aeronautics, General Goethals approved coordination of all Government aeronautics under one authority. In speaking of his belief in concentrating authority, General Goethals said it might become necessary to create a department of munitions. At the same time a House committee was considering legislation to greatly increase the aircraft of the Army and Navy, possibly to a fleet of 100,000 machines. Recommendation has been made by a sub-committee headed by Representative Calder of New York that North Island in San Diego Harbor be taken over as a site for an aerial training station.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Joseph E. Levine’s presentation of Federico Fellini’s ‘8½’ will make its American debut on June 25 at the new Festival Theatre, 57th St., at Fifth Ave., and simultaneously at the New Embassy Theater on Broadway. The inauguration of the Festival Theatre, New York’s newest intimate cinema, built by Levine in association with James J. Mage, will take place the evening before at a special invitational premiere. The opening of Fellini’s ‘8½,’ his first full-length feature since ‘La Dolce Vita,’ will bring the director, who has won two Academy Awards, here from Rome for promotional activities prior to the premiere. An Embassy Pictures release, ‘8½’ stars Marcello Mastroianni, Claudia Cardinale, Anouk Aimee and Sanda Milo. An Angelo Rizzoli production, it was filmed in wide-screen and black-and-white. The drama tells the story of a famed motion picture director beset with doubts about a new film he has undertaken.” (Editor’s note: Anouk Aimee died June 18, 2024 at age 92.)

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Nicole Kidman
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Lionel Richie
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Here Comes Summer” singer Jerry Keller, who was born in 1937; “The Queen” director Stephen Frears, who was born in 1941; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Brian Wilson (The Beach Boys), who was born in 1942; “Snowbird” singer Anne Murray, who was born in 1945; “This Old House” host Bob Vila, who was born in 1946; The Crystals singer Dolores “LaLa” Brooks, who was born in 1947; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Lionel Richie, who was born in 1949; “The Simpsons” star Tress MacNeille, who was born in 1951; “Roseanne” star John Goodman, who was born in 1952; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer John Taylor (Duran Duran), who was born in 1960; “Remember the Titans” director Boaz Yakin, who was born in 1966; Oscar-winning actress Nicole Kidman, who was born in 1967; “Sin City” director Robert Rodriguez, who was born in 1968; singer-songwriter Amos Lee, who was born in 1977; and former N.Y. Jets and Giants defensive end Leonard Williams, who was born in 1994.

Brian Wilson
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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UP WHERE WE BELONG: Roger Burnham and Eleanor Waring had the first balloon honeymoon on this day in 1909. The lovebirds took off from Woods Hole, Cape Cod, Mass., at 12:40 p.m. in the balloon Pittsfield and landed at 4:30 p.m. in an orchard at Holbrook, Mass.

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VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF LIFE: “The Ed Sullivan Show” premiered on this day in 1948. Officially titled “Toast of the Town” until 1955, the popular variety show ran until 1971. Sullivan signed all types of acts, both well-known and new, trying to have something to please everyone. Thousands of performers appeared, many making their television debut, such as Irving Berlin, Victor Borge, Hedy Lamarr, Walt Disney, Fred Astaire and Jane Powell. Two acts attracted the largest audiences of all time: Elvis Presley and the Beatles.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“When there’s love present, it’s easier to deal with life.”

— Beach Boys co-founder Brian Wilson, who was born on this day in 1942


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