Brooklyn Boro

June 17: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 17, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Millions of dollars worth of paper money of a new type will be put into circulation upon the establishment of the Federal Reserve banks within the next few weeks. Under the Federal Reserve bank act, each of the twelve reserve banks will receive advances from the Reserve Board in the form of Federal Reserve notes, a distinctly new sort of paper money. Commercial paper will be the collateral advanced by the various banks as security for these notes. Controller of the Currency Williams has samples of this new paper money now under consideration. At his request, Joseph E. Ralph, director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, prepared notes of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 denominations, and these have been submitted to Secretary McAdoo. It is not likely, however, that the samples will be officially accepted until the members of the Federal Reserve Board have been confirmed by the Senate and can confer with Secretary McAdoo and Controller Williams concerning the new notes. The new $5 note submitted by Mr. Ralph is typical of agriculture. The portrait on the face of the note is Lincoln’s and the back shows a harvesting machine and allegorical figures typical of farming. The $10 note bears a portrait of Cleveland and a manufacturing scene. The $20 note bears Jackson’s portrait and is typical of commerce, having a steamship, train and other mediums of trade on the back. Grant’s picture is shown on the $50 note and Franklin’s portrait adorns the $100 bill. Both of these larger bills are typical of the arts. All the bills will be printed in green ink on the back, while black ink will be used on the faces.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1932, the Eagle said, “That new Washington quarter dollar may be as pretty as artists say it is, but we have too many kinds of coins of the same denomination, each harder to get and each easier to spend than the others, which is a sad reflection.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “On July 6, the first of a series of pictures dealing with the development of the U.S. Secret Service will start work with Ronald Reagan featured.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “WITH THE BRITISH IN NORMANDY (U.P.) — King George VI of England rode through a field strewn with German and British dead and past the wrecks of German cannon to pay a surprise visit to embattled British troops on the Normandy beachhead. Wearing the uniform of an admiral of the fleet, the King rode ashore unceremoniously yesterday in an American ‘duck’ let down from the British cruiser Arethusa. Startled troops on the beach stopped work to cheer him wildly, and French peasants gave the victory sign and cried ‘Vive le Roi!’ as the King passed along a country lane toward Gen. Sir Bernard L. Montgomery’s advance headquarters. A fierce battle was raging on the front line as the King toured this area. On his first visit to France since April, 1940, the King was accompanied by high-ranking officers.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “All-out war to smash the menacing traffic in narcotic drugs was launched by the American Legion yesterday at the opening of a three-day conference in the Waldorf-Astoria. In the shadow of shocking revelations of dope addiction by school children, brought out in State Attorney General Nathaniel Goldstein’s investigation, the Legion called on its 3,000,000 war veterans in 17,850 posts all over the nation and 1,000,000 members of the auxiliary to join in a long-range anti-dope crusade. In Albany, at about the same time, Governor [Thomas] Dewey announced setting up of an experimental program for the permanent cure of women drug addicts in State prisons — which, if successful, is to be extended to include men.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle said, “Congress is taking a hard look at what some members describe as the cost of prestige, otherwise referred to as the man-on-the-moon program, and it is beginning to act like the braggadocio who thinks parachuting would be a great sport until the time arrives for the first jump. A landing on the moon has been the primary space goal of the United States in the 1960s since the decade began, and Congress has been as enthusiastic as any group at the prospect of tasting lunar dust first. But few anticipated five years ago that the space budget would double every year, until the fiscal 1964 request would total $5.7 billion. More than half of this budget, or $3.7 billion, is for various stages of the moon conquest program. This makes the moon not only a target for enthusiastic spacemen, but congressional economy hunters as well. Belatedly — almost as though the moon race whizzed by unseen — critics in and out of Congress are beginning to question the relative of spending so much for space and so little for unfinished projects on earth. If the administration could assure Congress the meteoric rise of the space budget — and particularly the man-on-the-moon part of it — had reached a plateau, perhaps more enthusiastic support could be developed for the 1964 request. But under the present policy of accelerating program after program, no such assurance can be given for 1964 or any year in the near future.”

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Venus Williams
Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP
Kendrick Lamar
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, who was born in 1943; “Copacabana” singer Barry Manilow, who was born in Brooklyn in 1943; author and commentator Linda Chavez, who was born in 1947; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Gregg Rolie (Santana/Journey), who was born in 1947; former Cincinnati Reds star Dave Concepcion, who was born in 1948; former “Saturday Night Live” star Joe Piscopo, who was born in 1951; former N.Y. Islanders general manager Mike Milbury, who was born in 1952; Dead Kennedys singer Jello Biafra, who was born in 1958; “As Good as it Gets” star Greg Kinnear, who was born in 1963; fashion designer Tory Burch, who was born in 1966; former “Saturday Night Live” star Will Forte, who was born in 1970; tennis superstar Venus Williams, who was born in 1980; and rapper Kendrick Lamar, who was born in 1987.

Barry Manilow
John Salangsang/Invision/AP

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UPHILL CLIMB: The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought near Charleston, Mass., on this day in 1775. More than 1,000 British redcoats and 450 American colonists were killed or wounded. Famously, the order was given, “Don’t fire until you see the whites of their eyes.”

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STOLEN TRUST: On this day in 1972, five White House operatives were arrested for breaking into Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. An investigation led to threats of impeachment against Republican President Richard Nixon, who resigned on Aug. 9, 1974.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Misfits aren’t misfits among other misfits.”

— singer Barry Manilow, who was born in Brooklyn on this day in 1943


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