Brooklyn Boro

June 15: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 15, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

 THISON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Senator Charles Curtis of Kansas has Indian blood in his veins and in his youth wore the regulation blanket of his Indian forefathers. He was born Jan. 25, 1860, on the Kaw Indian reservation in Kansas, a descendant of a line of Indian chieftains and French and Canadian traders. His mother died when he was a child, and he was brought up by an Indian grandmother, who later sent him to his white relatives in Topeka for a white man’s education. The education he got, which made him a U.S. senator and now a candidate for vice president of the United States, was the conglomerate outcome of what he learned in such ‘big cities’ as Topeka and out on the near-frontiers of Kansas and vicinity. He became famous in the west as a jockey, he worked as a hack driver, practiced law and taught Sunday school, and became an anti-vice crusader. Eventually he was elected as a representative from his own state. He had been before mentioned for the Republican vice presidential nomination.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “A woman being cited by the National Father’s Day Committee is something new … But when it’s Kate Smith, and the reason for the honor is her effort in behalf of the war, it’s natural. And Joe E. Brown gets the committee’s Eisenhower Medal tonight.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “GROTON, CONN., JUNE 14 (U.P.) — President Truman disclosed today that the first atomic submarine engine will be in operation soon and predicted it would open a new era as revolutionary as that set off by the invention of the ocean steamship. The President gave a glowing report on the nation’s atomic energy progress at ceremonies for the laying of the keel of the $40,000,000 Nautilus, the world’s first atomic-powered submarine. ‘The military significance of this vessel is tremendous,’ Truman told 10,000 persons at the Flag Day ceremonies. ‘The engine of the Nautilus will have as revolutionary an effect on the navies of the world as did the first ocean steamship 120 years ago. This vessel is the forerunner of atomic-powered merchant ships and airplanes, of atomic power plants producing electricity for factories, farms and homes.’ The President took the occasion to criticize Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, without naming him, for talking about a $40,000,000,000 tax cut. He warned against ‘cut-rate bargain counter’ policies which, he said, would severely hurt the nation’s defense effort. But most of the President’s speech was devoted to the new submarine and the ‘marvelous’ new things it foreshadows.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “Don’t try to tell Ronald Reagan that baseball isn’t a dangerous game. The star portrays Grover Cleveland Alexander, the famous baseball pitcher, in ‘The Winning Team,’ which marked his first athletic role at Warner Brothers since he broke his leg in a charity ball game a couple of years ago. During the making of the new film, and not according to script, he was spiked accidentally on the same leg by Jerry Priddy, the Detroit Tiger second baseman, who plays a role in the film.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle said, “A new and intensified Soviet drive to establish a cordon of Communist-dominated governments in the Caribbean, stretching down through South America, has been launched from Moscow, Prague, Havana and Santiago, Chile, according to information received by the Brooklyn Eagle from sources in those cities. A young Communist double agent who recently returned from a lengthy trip through Czechoslovakia, Moscow and Outer Mongolia, and who enjoys the confidence of the Cuban regime, brings information to the effect that the new Russian campaign includes even the sending of a Latin-American astronaut into space, so that he can then visit all the capitals of this hemisphere and spread anti-United States propaganda. The informant, whose name must be kept secret because he will shortly return to Cuba and probably to Prague, also revealed that since the Fidel Castro government no longer has diplomatic relations with most of the Latin American nations, Communist agents in almost all of the Chilean embassies in Latin America are being used as couriers for the transmittal of instructions and maintenance of communications among the Communist activists in the hemisphere.”

***

Leah Remini
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Courteney Cox
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Baseball Hall of Famer Billy Williams, who was born in 1938; political activist and businessman Ward Connerly, who was born in 1939; Super Bowl-winning coach Mike Holmgren, who was born in 1948; former Houston Astros manager Dusty Baker, who was born in 1949; “Dance Fever” host Deney Terrio, who was born in 1950; Kansas lead singer Steve Walsh, who was born in 1951; “According to Jim” star Jim Belushi, who was born in 1954; Baseball Hall of Famer and former N.Y. Yankees third baseman Wade Boggs, who was born in 1958; “The Young and the Restless” star Eileen Davidson, who was born in 1959; Oscar-winning actress Helen Hunt, who was born in 1963; “Friends” star Courteney Cox, who was born in 1964; “The King of Queens” star Leah Remini, who was born in 1970; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher and 2001 ALCS MVP Andy Pettitte, who was born in 1972; “How I Met Your Mother” star Neil Patrick Harris, who was born in 1973; and Olympic gold medal-winning gymnast Madison Kocian, who was born in 1997.

Andy Pettitte
Kathy Willens/AP

***

LAW OF THE LAND: On this day in 1215, King John of England sealed the Magna Carta “in the meadow called Ronimed between Windsor and Staines.” Continually reinterpreted, the Magna Carta influenced the rise of England’s constitutional monarchy and lent historical weight to 18th-century ideas about inalienable natural law. It is still invoked popularly and in jurisprudence as a symbol of the written law’s power to subdue tyranny. Four original copies of the 1215 charter survive.

***

COLLEGE CREDIT: The 12th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on this day in 1804. It changed the method of electing the president and vice president after a tie in the electoral college during the election of 1800. Rather than each elector voting for two candidates, with the candidate receiving the most votes elected president and the second-place candidate elected vice president, each elector was now required to designate their choice for president and vice president, respectively.

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“You campaign in poetry. You govern in prose.”

— former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, who was born on this day in 1932


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment