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June 14: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 14, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “CHICAGO, JUNE 13 — Adlai E. Stevenson, Vice President of the United States through the second [Grover] Cleveland administration, died tonight at a hospital after an illness of several months. His three children were at his bedside. Adlai Ewing Stevenson had a long and honorable public career. He was Vice President from 1893 to 1897 under President Cleveland. In 1900 he again was nominated by the Democratic party for Vice President and ran with Wiliam J. Bryan, the party’s candidate for President, but was defeated. He served as a member of the Forty-fourth and Forty-sixth Congress and from 1885 to 1889 he was first assistant postmaster general under President Cleveland. His last appearance as a candidate for public office was in 1908 when he was nominated for governor of Illinois by the Democratic party and was defeated by Charles E. Deneen, Republican. Mr. Stevenson was born in Christian county, Kentucky, October 23, 1835, of Scotch-Irish parentage. In 1852 his parents moved to Bloomington, Ill. He attended the public schools and the University of Illinois. In 1856 he was graduated from Center College, Danville, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice law in 1858.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Eagle reported, “A red flag waved from the top of the 25-foot Eternal Light pole in Madison Square Park, Manhattan, this morning, and a police emergency squad, a hook and ladder company and a group of patriotically indignant park loungers could not get it down. In the still of the night, the flag had been hoisted and the rope ripped away. A passerby at dawn noticed the flag and notified a policeman. The Park Department was notified to send its electric light repair man, with his scaling apparatus.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “Elizabeth Taylor, 12-year-old actress who made her screen debut in ‘Lassie Come Home,’ will be featured by M.G.M. in ‘Hold High the Torch,’ an original story by Lionel Houser, about a girl and a war dog, the latter to be played by Lassie. Elizabeth has since appeared in ‘The White Cliffs of Dover’ and is now playing in ‘National Velvet,’ with Mickey Rooney.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle’s horoscope column said, “FRIDAY, JUNE 14 — Born today, you will not have the easiest kind of life. There will be obstacles to meet and difficulties to surmount. But once you have overcome unfavorable circumstances, you will attain the success you desire, including, quite likely, fame as well as fortune. You have a sympathetic and kindly heart for all who are less fortunate than yourself. In fact, you are spiritually inclined and while you are quite religious, you will not necessarily conform to any dogmatic creed but be broadminded and fair in all your applications. You have a good head for financial matters. In fact, with your type of mind, you would make an excellent campaign manager for raising money for some worthy cause.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, Eagle columnist Robert M. Grannis said, “Today is Flag Day and a lot of Americans won’t bother to pay any attention to it. Others will explore the attic and drag out the banner which guarantees their freedom. It will be dusty and worn and there will be moth holes here and there but the colors will remain intact. Nothing ever happens to the significance of this emblem and nothing ever will so long as folks retain even an ounce of appreciation. I decided to write about the flag today to answer a neighbor who thinks that nationalism is something to be ashamed of. Personally, I think he is an ass and I hope he reads this.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1956, the Bay Ridge Home Reporter said, “A sudden and unexpected blast by Commissioner Robert Moses against Army authorities today led to speculation that the Port of New York and Triborough Bridge Authorities will be unable to reach an agreement with the military for the passage of the Narrows Bridge approach through Fort Hamilton — thereby forcing adoption of an alternate route elsewhere in the Bay Ridge area. Mr. Moses revealed that he has protested to the Secretary of the Army ‘about delays and exactions in connection with settling for air and other rights’ at the two military posts. ‘The Army wants us to rebuild Hamilton as a perfect dream resort and charge it to the bridge bondholders,’ he complained. ‘At one time they talked about $30 million. We are still waiting and arguing. These things take years as they go round and round the fort involved, to Governors Island, to Washington and around again. Talk about frustration!’ It is doubtful that even as outspoken a man as Moses would have risked snagging the negotiations with the military by coming out with such strong language unless the talks had bogged down to near-hopelessness. However, Arthur S. Hodgkiss, second in command at the Triborough Bridge Authority, told the Home Reporter that he is still negotiating with the Army on the local level. ‘We are getting closer to an agreement — or closer to a disagreement, whichever way you want to look at it,’ Mr. Hodgkiss said.”

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Marla Gibbs
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP
Lucy Hale
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “The Jeffersons” star Marla Gibbs, who was born in 1931; former House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, who was born in 1939; former President Donald Trump, who was born in 1946; Country Joe and the Fish co-founder Barry Melton, who was born in Brooklyn in 1947; Culture Club singer Boy George, who was born in 1961; journalist and school choice activist Campbell Brown, who was born in 1968; Tennis Hall of Famer Steffi Graf, who was born in 1969; “Juno” screenwriter Diablo Cody, who was born in 1978; “Glee” star Kevin McHale, who was born in 1988; “Pretty Little Liars” star Lucy Hale, who was born in 1989; and former Little Mix singer Jesy Nelson, who was born in 1991.

Donald Trump
Greg Allen/Invision/AP

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HOT AND COLE: Nat King Cole recorded “The Christmas Song” on this day in 1946. Mel Torme and Robert Wells wrote the song during a blistering heat wave in July 1945. Cole’s original recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1974.

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BROOKLYN BENCHMARK: President Bill Clinton nominated Brooklyn native Ruth Bader Ginsburg to the U.S. Supreme Court on this day in 1993. On Aug. 3, the Senate confirmed her by a vote of 96-3. Ginsburg served until her death on Sept. 18, 2020 and was succeeded by Amy Coney Barrett.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Resolved, that the flag of the thirteen United States shall be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the Union be thirteen stars, white on a blue field, representing a new constellation.”

— John Adams’ resolution to Congress, June 14, 1777


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