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June 13: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 13, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1842, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Leonard Wilcox was chosen a Senator to Congress by the New Hampshire Legislature, on Wednesday last, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Franklin Pierce. Mr. Wilcox has already supplied the vacancy to the commencement of the session, under a temporary appointment from the Governor.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1876, the Eagle said, “Now that we have had the newest feat in railroading a pronounced success, and have been informed of the safe arrival of the transcontinental party in San Francisco, considerably ahead of the scheduled time, we await with interest the next move in electricity. There is little more to be accomplished in the way of speed in railroading, and certainly nothing in point of comfort and convenience. In electricity there remains much to be accomplished, and just as truly as this Centennial era has seen the triumphs of the rail, so will the first decade of the next Centennial see electricity performing more marvels than we of today have noted in steam. We are yet to telegraph without wires; to transmit sound over great distances, and to accomplish in fact so much that as yet remains unaccomplished, that the people of 1976 will wonder how on earth we had the courage to live with as few discoveries and ‘modern conveniences’ as we in our ignorance think ourselves most fortunate in possessing.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “CLEVELAND, OHIO — The nomination of Charles G. Dawes as Republican candidate for Vice President is generally accepted as offering a strong Administration ticket, possessing the great virtue of being politically consistent. The Coolidge-Dawes combination will be conservative throughout. The Old Guard element in the Republican ranks is greatly pleased at the choice of Dawes and even more satisfied at the manner in which he was forced on the President. The progressive sentiment is chagrined at the failure to nominate a man more in sympathy with the political temper of the times.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (AP) — The Washington Post, long the property of the celebrated McLean family, now belongs to Eugene Meyer, until a month ago Governor of the Federal Reserve Board. Meyer announced his sole ownership last night after a District of Columbia court had ratified the auction sale of the property to a previously unidentified bidder, for $825,000. The former Reserve board official proclaimed that he would improve the paper extensively and operate it as an independent organ ‘devoted to the best interests of the people of Washington and vicinity.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Some Republican members of Congress said today there should be an investigation to bring out all the circumstances of Brig. Gen. Elliott Roosevelt’s business transaction in which he allegedly settled a $200,000 loan for $4,000. Those suggesting such an enquiry, however, did not say they actually would move toward obtaining one. Caruthers C. Ewing, New York attorney, disclosed the transaction at Danville, Ill., yesterday, stating that John Hartford, president of the Atlantic and Pacific Tea Co., loaned Elliott the $200,000 in 1939 to expand his radio holdings. Mr. Ewing is in Danville as an attorney for A. & P. at the chain’s Federal Court trial for alleged violations of antitrust laws. Mr. Ewing said Jesse Jones, former Secretary of Commerce, told Mr. Hartford in 1942 that ‘the Roosevelt family wanted to compromise the indebtedness.’ Elliott’s note and collateral were turned over to Mr. Jones in exchange for a $4,000 check ‘and the whole thing was closed,’ he said. ‘Hartford took the whole thing as a loss and entered it ($196,000) on his 1942 income tax report as a bad debt,’ Mr. Ewing said. Representative Harold Knutson, Minnesota, ranking Republican member of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, said Mr. Ewing’s statement ‘sounds almost unbelievable’ but that an investigation should be made if the facts are correct.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “BERKELEY, CAL. (U.P.) — President Truman today told a University of California graduation day crowd of 15,000 that post-war Soviet ‘obstruction and aggression’ constitutes ‘the most bitter disappointment of our time.’ But in his speech broadcast around the world by radio the chief executive also beckoned Russia to world peace and understanding through a door ‘always open for honest negotiations looking toward genuine settlement.’ He abruptly slammed the door, however, on ‘fast and loose deals between great powers to the detriment of other nations or at the expense of principle.’ Today’s crowd was the largest of Mr. Truman’s current cross-country tour and one of the largest ever to hear him. University officials estimated it at about 15,000 persons.”

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Ally Sheedy
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Chris Evans
Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include lawyer and politician Eleanor Holmes Norton, who was born in 1937; “A Clockwork Orange” star Malcolm McDowell, who was born in 1943; “The Waltons” star Richard Thomas, who was born in 1951; “Last Man Standing” star Tim Allen, who was born in 1953; “St. Elmo’s Fire” star Ally Sheedy, who was born in 1962; sports journalist Hannah Storm, who was born in 1962; Weezer co-founder Rivers Cuomo, who was born in 1970; “Avengers” star Chris Evans, who was born in 1981; former NFL cornerback Nate Jones, who was born in 1982; “2 Broke Girls” star Kat Dennings, who was born in 1986; “Full House” stars Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen, who were born in 1986; former N.Y. Mets catcher James McCann, who was born in 1990; and “Kick-Ass” star Aaron Taylor-Johnson, who was born in 1990.

Tim Allen
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

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A WAY WITH WORDS: William Butler Yeats was born in Dublin on this day in 1865. The Nobel Prize-winning poet and dramatist once wrote: “If an author interprets a poem of his own, he limits its suggestibility.” Yeats died in France in 1939. After World War II, his body was returned to Ireland for reburial.

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ON THE RIGHT TRACK: The world’s first roller coaster opened in Coney Island on this day in 1884. Built and later patented by LaMarcus Thompson, the “Gravity Pleasure Switchback Railway” boasted two parallel 600-foot tracks that descended from 50 feet. The cars traveled at six miles per hour and riders paid five cents each for their rides. The roller coaster was a sensation and soon amusement parks all over the world featured them.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper.”

— poet William Butler Yeats, who was born on this day in 1865


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