Brooklyn Boro

June 12: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 12, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1849, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Nashville papers received this afternoon state that Ex-President James K. Polk is lying dangerously ill of Cholera.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1892, the Eagle said, “The result of the proceedings at Minneapolis caused quite general surprise throughout England. Everybody felt sure that the fight between [President Benjamin] Harrison and [James G.] Blaine would insure the choice of a ‘dark horse.’ To avenge themselves for the upsetting of their calculations, the sagacious editorial writers now set to work to abuse the uncertainties of American politics.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Eagle reported, “Nora Bayes won five full minutes of curtains at the Palace Theater yesterday with her character song recital, her comedy stage business and her general irresistibility. Biggest of all in her repertoire was a new patriotic song by George M. Cohan, called ‘Over There,’ which had pep and go to it.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “CONVENTION HALL, CLEVELAND — Judge William S. Kenyon of Iowa was decided upon this afternoon, by William M. Butler, the President’s manager, as the Administration candidate for Vice President. It is uncertain, however, whether Judge Kenyon can be nominated in the face of a speedily developed sentiment for Senator Charles Curtis of Kansas, Republican whip in the upper house, who is being boomed by the Old Guard, following the practical elimination of Senator William E. Borah at his own insistent request. The Butler forces, which earlier today were in a state of utter confusion over Mr. Borah’s declination, fear that the nomination of Senator Curtis would restore the shattered prestige of the Old Guard and grant important recognition to the United States Senate, which has up to now been totally ignored. There may be one final desperate effort to dragoon Senator Borah into second place, but, failing that, the President’s managers will back Judge Kenyon according to present indications. The situation is shifting from minute to minute and may take an unexpected turn at any time.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “Henry Clay Folger of 24 Brevoort Place and Glen Cove, L.I., former president of the Standard Oil Company of New York and owner of one of the world’s great collections of Shakespeareana, died yesterday in St. John’s Hospital after an operation. He went to the hospital two weeks ago from his Glen Cove home and would have been 73 years old next Wednesday. The funeral services will be held in the Central Congregational Church chapel, Hancock St., near Franklin Ave., tomorrow night at 8 o’clock. Mr. Folger is survived by his wife, Emily C. Jordan Folger; a sister and two brothers. Mr. Folger was born in this city, a son of Henry C. and Eliza J. Clark Folger. After graduating from Adelphi College, Brooklyn, he entered Amherst, where he received the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in 1879 and 1881, respectively. On July 1, 1879, probably only a few days after leaving college, he entered the oil business as a clerk in the offices of Charles Pratt & Co. in Brooklyn … The interest of Mr. Folger in Shakespeare began when he was at Adelphi College. The later work of gathering and arranging his library was always for him, as for his wife, a labor of love. There is little doubt that the Folger collection, of some 25,000 volumes, is the finest in the United States.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “Brooklyn friends and associates of former Corrections Commissioner David Marcus, as well as borough Jewry in general today, mourned the death of the World War II hero, killed in action Thursday night while serving as supreme commander of the Israeli forces in Jerusalem. Colonel Marcus was killed just a few hours before the Jewish-Arab truce went into effect, local representatives of Israel announced. His connection with Israel had been kept a secret and it was revealed yesterday that he created the Jewish army almost single-handedly, working day and night toward that end. Many Brooklynites knew him as Mickey Marcus — the Mickey Marcus who was a baseball and football star at Boys High School, who was a member of the class of ’24 at West Point, who was graduated from Brooklyn Law School in 1928, who served as a fighting Corrections Commissioner, and who then turned in a splendid record during World War II, taking a part in drafting German, Italian and Japanese surrender terms and going on many confidential missions for President Roosevelt and President Truman. ‘His name will live forever in the annals of the Jewish people,’ was part of the text of a telegram sent by David Ben-Gurion, Prime Minister of Israel, and the heroic exploits of Colonel Marcus in striving for the success of the Jewish forces bear out this statement.”

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Adriana Lima
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Kerry Kittles
Marty Lederhandler/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include broadcaster and Basketball Hall of Famer Marv Albert, who was born in 1941; “Sesame Street” star Sonia Manzano, who was born in 1950; “thirtysomething” star Timothy Busfield, who was born in 1957; “The Kids in the Hall” star Scott Thompson, who was born in 1959; psychologist and cultural critic Jordan Peterson, who was born in 1962; former N.J. Nets shooting guard Kerry Kittles, who was born in 1974; former N.Y. Yankees outfielder and 2009 World Series MVP Hideki Matsui, who was born in 1974; 2004 NBA Sixth Man of the Year Antawn Jamison, who was born in 1976; former NFL tight end and Super Bowl champion Dallas Clark, who was born in 1979; and actress and supermodel Adriana Lima, who was born in 1981.

Hideki Matsui
Seth Wenig/AP

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DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER: The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum was dedicated in Cooperstown, N.Y., on this day in 1939. More than 200 individuals have been honored for their contributions to the game by induction in the hall. The first players chosen for membership were Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, Babe Ruth, Christy Mathewson and Walter Johnson. Relics and memorabilia from the history of baseball are housed at this shrine of America’s national sport.

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COLD WAR COMMAND: President Ronald Reagan gave his “Tear Down this Wall” speech on this day in 1987. Standing at the Brandenburg Gate and the Berlin Wall, Reagan challenged Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev to give more than lip service to liberalization in the Eastern Bloc. “General Secretary Gorbachev,” he said, “if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!” The wall finally came down in 1989.

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CENTENNIAL MAN: George Herbert Walker Bush was born in Milton, Mass., on this day in 1924. At 18, Bush became the youngest pilot in the Navy during World War II and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross. After graduating from Yale, he found success in the Texas oil industry before turning to public service. He was U.S. representative for Texas, United Nations ambassador, head of the Republican National Committee and director of the CIA before becoming vice president under Ronald Reagan (1981-89). He was elected president in 1988 but lost to Bill Clinton in 1992. His son George W. Bush won the presidency eight years later and served two terms. The elder Bush died Nov. 30, 2018, seven months after the death of his wife Barbara.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“No generation can escape history.”

— former President George H.W. Bush, who was born on this day in 1924

 


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