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Our world in photos: June 6

Blood can be seen in the aftermath of the Israeli strike on a U.N.-run school that killed dozens of Palestinians in the Nusseirat refugee camp in the Gaza Strip, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)
Photo: Jehad Alshrafi/AP

GAZA — Persistent conflict that for many, still, is inexplicable: Blood can be seen in the aftermath of the Israeli strike on a U.N.-run school that killed dozens of Palestinians in the Nuseirat refugee camp in the Gaza Strip, Thursday, June 6, 2024. Although Israeli forces claimed that Hamas militants were operating from within the school, some international news agencies reported that the IDF’s own surveillance images showed the buildings to be owned by the United Nations, specifically its UNRWA (United Nations Relief and Works Agency), with a specific mission of working with Palestinian refugees.

According to witnesses and hospital officials, the strike killed more than 30 people, including 23 women and children, many of whom had fled Israeli operations and bombardment in northern Gaza.

Coco Gauff of the U.S. plays a shot against Poland's Iga Swiatek during their semifinal match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)
Photo: Jean-Francois Badias/AP

PARIS — American champion fought valiantly against world’s top player: Coco Gauff of the U.S. plays a shot against Poland’s Iga Swiatek during their semifinal match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Thursday, June 6, 2024. Swiatek won 6-2, 6-4 and has now advanced to the finals.

Swiatek, who just turned 23 on May 31, currently holds the #1 rank worldwide from the Women’s Tennis Association, which she has held for a total of 106 weeks, just over two years.

Boys stand on piers and walkways on Gardi Sugdub Island, part of the San Blas archipelago off Panama's Caribbean coast, Saturday, May 25, 2024. Due to rising sea levels, about 300 Guna Indigenous families will relocate to new homes, built by the government, on the mainland. (AP Photo/Matias Delacroix)
Photo: Matias Delacroix/AP

PANAMA — Nature’s revenge — is it too late to stop melting glaciers? Boys stand on piers and walkways on Gardi Sugdub Island, part of the San Blas archipelago off Panama’s Caribbean coast, Saturday, May 25, 2024. Due to rising sea levels, about 300 Guna Indigenous families will relocate to new homes built by the government on the mainland. This will be an adjustment for the Guna, the majority of whom are spread over 38 islands in the archipelago, each having their own distinct traditions. Each group has a “saila,” or chief, who serves both as a political and spiritual leader.

The Associated Press reported on Thursday that the new homes typically have two bedrooms and a backyard. Many of their new residents have had to transport their own stoves, gas cylinders and other equipment. However, other Guna families have chosen to remain, for now, on Gardi Sugdub.

A Canadian Mountie pays her respects during the Canadian commemorative ceremony marking the 80th anniversary of the World War II D-Day landing, at the Juno Beach Centre near Courseulles-sur-Mer, Normandy, Thursday, June 6, 2024. Normandy is hosting various events to officially commemorate the 80th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place on June 6, 1944. (Lou Benoist, Pool via AP)
Photo: Lou Benoist, Pool via AP

NORMANDY — Visiting Canadian Mountie remembers D-Day: A Canadian Mountie pays her respects during the Canadian commemorative ceremony marking the 80th anniversary of the World War II D-Day landing, at the Juno Beach Centre near Courseulles-sur-Mer, Normandy, Thursday, June 6, 2024. Normandy is hosting various events to officially commemorate the 80th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place on June 6, 1944. 

The D-Day Allied invasion was unprecedented in scale and audacity, utilizing a historic-sized armada of ships, troops, planes, parachutes and vehicles to change the course of World War II.

Boeing's Starliner capsule, atop an Atlas V rocket, lifts off from launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41 Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are headed to the International Space Station. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
Photo: Chris O’Meara/AP

FLORIDA — Up and away, bon voyage! Boeing’s Starliner capsule, atop an Atlas V rocket, lifts off from the launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41 Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in Cape Canaveral, FL. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are headed to the International Space Station. They are the first astronauts — essentially being test pilots — to fly the new capsule, the Associated Press reported on Wednesday, June 5, for a voyage expected to last just over 25 hours and scheduled for a June 6 arrival at the International Space Station. The launch and orbit establishment finally took place after a series of delays due in part to flaws in the spacecraft. Astronauts Wilmore and Williams will spend about a week at the orbiting lab and are expected to touch down in a western U.S. desert on Friday, June 14.

As Boeing has also been dealing with separate safety issues in its airplane manufacturing division, Wednesday’s successful launch was deemed a triumph.

South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol, center left, and his wife Kim Keon Hee, center right, salute during a ceremony to mark the 69th Memorial Day at the Seoul National Cemetery in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, Pool)
Photo: Lee Jin-man, Pool

SEOUL — All around the world, this is the season for conflict remembrances: South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol, center left, and his wife Kim Keon Hee, center right, salute during a ceremony to mark the 69th Memorial Day at the Seoul National Cemetery in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, June 6, 2024. The 69th Memorial Day observances commemorate Koreans who contributed to or died while serving the country, according to The Korea Times. Yoon declared in his address that South Korea will never overlook the threat from North Korea and the government will “resolutely respond” to the North’s provocations.

Yoon criticized North Korea for refusing to “accept the progress of history” and instead “remains on a path of regression.”

A migrant woman from Mexico talks with a Border Patrol agent before being transported in a van to be processed for asylum, Wednesday, June 5, 2024, near Dulzura, Calif. President Joe Biden on Tuesday unveiled plans to enact immediate significant restrictions on migrants seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border as the White House tries to neutralize immigration as a political liability ahead of the November elections. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Photo: Gregory Bull/AP

CALIFORNIA — A change, a crackdown at the southern border: A migrant woman from Mexico talks with a Border Patrol agent before being transported in a van to be processed for asylum, Wednesday, June 5, 2024, near Dulzura, CA. President Joe Biden on Tuesday unveiled plans to enact immediate significant restrictions on migrants seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border as the White House tries to neutralize immigration as a political liability ahead of the November elections. The proclamation would bar migrants from being granted asylum when U.S. officials deem that the southern border is overwhelmed. The Democratic president had been considering unilateral action for months after the collapse of a bipartisan border security deal in Congress.

At the same time, Biden said, “I believe immigration has always been the lifeblood of America.”

Miami Dolphins Elijah Campbell, right, picks up the ball as Siran Neal is late with the catch during NFL football practice at the team's training facility, Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in Miami Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)
Photo: Marta Lavandier/AP

MIAMI — Yes, practice is more fun than a game: Miami Dolphins Elijah Campbell, right, picks up the ball as Siran Neal is late with the catch during NFL football practice at the team’s training facility, Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in Miami Gardens, FL. 

Pre-season for the Dolphins’ 2024 season begins in August.

A Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic Jew cries during the funeral of Rabbi Moshe Kotlarsky, Vice Chairman of Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch—the educational arm of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement—and Director of the annual International Conference of Chabad-Lubavitch Emissaries, at Montefiore Cemetery, on Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in the Queens borough of New York. Kotlarsky passed away on Tuesday. He would have been 75 in four days. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
Photo: Andres Kudacki/AP

QUEENS — A young man’s anguish, the death of a beloved Rabbi: A Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic Jew cries during the funeral of Rabbi Moshe Kotlarsky, Vice Chairman of Merkos L’Inyonei Chinuch—the educational arm of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement—and Director of the annual International Conference of Chabad-Lubavitch Emissaries, at Montefiore Cemetery, on Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in the borough of Queens. Kotlarsky passed away on Tuesday, just four days short of his 75th birthday. He would have been 75 in four days. According to an obituary published in the Jewish Journal, Kotlarsky was born in Brooklyn’s Crown Heights section, the home of Chabad’s world headquarters. Working with the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, before the latter’s passing in 1994, Kotlarsky is credited with expanding Chabad globally and has carried on the Rebbe’s legacy by establishing thousands of Chabad outposts.

Kotlarsky also served as chair of the International Kinus Hashluchim, the annual convention of Chabad emissaries, which hosts thousands of emissaries in Crown Heights every year; they gather along Eastern Parkway for their “class picture” in a lineup stretching several city blocks.

A woman sits by crosses and flags at a US cemetery near Colleville-sur-Mer Normandy, Thursday, June 6, 2024. World War II veterans from across the United States as well as Britain and Canada are in Normandy this week to mark 80 years since the D-Day landings that helped lead to Hitler's defeat. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
Photo: Laurent Cipriani/AP

NORMANDY — Celebration of D-Day continues: A woman sits by crosses and flags at a US cemetery near Colleville-sur-Mer Normandy, Thursday, June 6, 2024. World War II veterans from across the United States, as well as Britain and Canada, are in Normandy this week to mark 80 years since the D-Day landings that helped lead to Hitler’s defeat.

According to the website of The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, it was established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944, as the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site contains the graves of almost 9,400 of America’s military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and related operations.

Toronto Blue Jays' Isiah Kiner-Falefa (7) is doused after the team's win over the Baltimore Orioles in a baseball game Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in Toronto. (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP)
Photo: Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP

TORONTO — A tradition persists — the Gatorade dump: Toronto Blue Jays’ Isiah Kiner-Falefa (7) is doused after the team’s win over the Baltimore Orioles in a baseball game Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in Toronto. Both teams named for birds reached the second inning with no score but finished it tied 2-2. The score remained tied until the bottom of the ninth inning when Toronto, with home-field advantage, scored the winning run, boosting the Blue Jays with a 3-2 win as they strived to rise from their 29-32 record, placing them fifth in the American League East. The Orioles (39-21) currently stand at 2nd in the same division.

The Gatorade dunk tradition is so fascinating to some sports journalists that it became the subject of a book in 2005. ESPN sports business writer Darren Rovell published “First in Thirst: How Gatorade Turned the Science of Sweat into a Cultural Phenomenon.” Rovell chronicles the story of the tradition’s origins in this work, which was Selected as one of Soundview Executive Book Summaries’ “30 Best Business Books” of the year.

Cincinnati Reds third baseman Jeimer Candelario, right, tags out Colorado Rockies' Jake Cave after he was caught in a rundown between third base and home plate in the eighth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Photo: David Zalubowski/AP

DENVER — ‘Gotcha!’: Cincinnati Reds third baseman Jeimer Candelario, right, tags out Colorado Rockies’ Jake Cave after he was caught in a rundown between third base and home plate in the eighth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, June 5, 2024, in Denver. The Reds entered the 9th inning one run behind — 6 to Denver’s 7 — but came from behind during a particularly stellar and thrilling top-of-the-9th inning when left-fielder Spencer Steer hit a two-run home run, and second-baseman Jonathan India topped that with a grand slam, pushing the Reds to a 12-7 win.

Both Cincinnati and Colorado rank fifth in their respective National League division (Central and West, respectively).

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