Boroughwide

Photoville festival returns to Brooklyn Bridge Park

It has more than 85 exhibits showcasing local and international photography

June 5, 2024 Wayne Daren Schneiderman
Photoville was created in 2011 to make visual storytelling accessible to everyone. Brooklyn Eagle photos by Wayne Daren Schneiderman
Share this:

BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK — Say “Cheese!” because Photoville is back for its 13th year.  

The annual festival celebrating thought-provoking local and international photography has returned to Brooklyn Bridge Park. It will make its presence felt in all five boroughs, boasting more than 85 exhibits on display through June 16.

The event kicked off with a free-to-the-public opening weekend in Brooklyn Bridge Park, overtaking Emily Roebling Plaza.

Photoville, co-founded in 2011 by Laura Roumanos, Sam Barzilay and Dave Shelley, introduces the public to a wide diversity of talented photographers, from students to acclaimed artists.

Photoville is expected to draw thousands on its opening weekend. Last year, the Brooklyn-based nonprofit reached a public audience of over one million people.
Photoville is expected to draw thousands on its opening weekend.
Last year, the Brooklyn-based nonprofit reached a public audience of over one million people.

Last year, the Brooklyn-based nonprofit reached a public audience of over one million people with the work of over 300 photographers.

Roumanos, co-founder and executive director of Photoville, told the Brooklyn Eagle that Photoville was created to make visual storytelling accessible to everyone.

“The exhibits are family friendly and are free as well,” Roumanos said. “We have a variety of diverse perspectives: stories from all over the world, including artists from Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa.”

Laura Roumanos, co-founder and executive director of Photoville, standing by Ismail Ferdous’ “Sea Beach.”
Laura Roumanos, co-founder and executive director of Photoville, standing by Ismail Ferdous’ “Sea Beach.”

“There are also exhibitions from teenagers, in addition to photographers’ works from the New York Times and National Geographic,” Roumanos continued. “There is a definite passion behind this. You might say it’s a real labor of love.”

Dave Shelley, a co-founder of Photoville, said, “This is a community that’s very interested in photography as an art form, but more importantly, a great way to connect to each other.”

Shelley said he is expecting thousands to show face on opening weekend.

“This year, we had over a thousand applications to get into Photoville,” he explained.  “The word is getting around. We are amazed at the amount of people that found their way here.”

Shelley also noted that while Photoville showcases photographers from all around the globe, roughly 40% of the artists are Brooklyn-based.

Tiffany Ketant, communications manager for Photoville, alongside Dave Shelley, one of the festival’s co-founders.
Tiffany Ketant, communications manager for Photoville, alongside Dave Shelley, one of the festival’s co-founders.

Exhibit highlights this year include a multimedia installation celebrating the 100-year history of WNYC, from its beginning as New York City’s Municipal Broadcasting Station in 1924 to the beloved public radio station it is today. This exhibit is curated by Michael Lorenzini (NYC Dept. of Records and Information Services) and Andy Lanset (New York Public Radio). Another featured exhibit is a pictorial encyclopedia of New York City theater since 1979 through the lens of New York Times theater photographer Sara Krulwich, presented by The New York Times.

Also found among the many exhibits is wildlife photography from Africa’s savannas, an unblinking look at the drug epidemic, a playful celebration of local journalism and more.


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment