Brooklyn Boro

June 5: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 5, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1850, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “THE LATEST FROM CALIFORNIA. — New Orleans, June 3, 1850. — The Alabama brings 82 passengers, and $62,000 in gold dust. Over $1,000,000 in gold dust were received by the steamer Panama, Capt. Bailey, at Panama, on the 21st ult. An immense emigration were starting for the mines.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1854, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — The Union says that reliable news from the City of Mexico has been received here, which state that the Gadsden treaty will now certainly be accepted.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1923, the Eagle reported, “The song of the 17-year locust, the Uhlans preceding a great army which is due here in a week or more, has already been raised on Long Island and has been heard by no less an authority than Dr. George P. Engelhardt, curator of the Department of Natural Science of the Brooklyn Museum. Dr. Engelhardt heard them last Saturday in the neighborhood of Camp Union. The song of the 17-year periodical songster can be distinguished from others by its ‘dull, continuous buzzing noise.’ It is the male which sings. He makes his music by rubbing his hind legs across the projecting veins of the wing covers and one gathers, from a perusal of the natural histories, that he carries a sort of bass-drum in his abdomen which helps out the orchestra wonderfully. The 17-year locust is not really a locust at all. It is said that he adopted the alias to shield himself from discovery. But if that was his idea, he has failed. ‘You are not a locust,’ every scientist who sees this impostor declares, ‘you are nothing but a cicada — a mere harvest fly.’ The cicada shrinks at the attack — and that is the reason, insect officials say, he hides himself in shame for 17 years before again venturing forth.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Eagle said, “All things are possible now that science has put talking films inside Wensley’s mechanical man, Televox, whose older brothers, Adam, Cain and Abel are now on duty with the War Department in Washington reporting on the condition of the city’s water supply. They are dumb, though not deaf. Televox, when he is called up, can respond ‘in a well-modulated and deferential voice’: ‘Televox speaking.’ Or he can call up his master: ‘This is Televox calling for Main 5000.’ The Vox Mechanica works all right. Thinking is within a narrow range, strikingly suggestive of an American election.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, NAPLES (U.P.) — The 5th Army completed the occupation of Rome, first Axis-held capital in Europe to be liberated, and swept on without pause across the Tiber River today in close pursuit of German forces fleeing in disorder toward a new defense line possibly 150 miles to the north. American tank and infantry vanguards already were streaming north of Rome under orders to annihilate the enemy armies when Allied headquarters announced the triumphant liberation of the religious capital of the world in a special communique on the 271st day of the Italian campaign. ‘Troops of the 5th Army occupied Rome on the night of June 4-5,’ the communique said. ‘Leading elements have passed through the city and are across the Tiber in some places.’ Adolf Hitler was reported by the official German news agency DNB to have ordered his forces to withdraw northwest of Rome to avoid drawing the ancient capital into the battle area. The clandestine radio Atlantic said the Germans were rushing three divisions from southern France and two others from northern Italy in an attempt to stem the Allied tide.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “ATLANTIC CITY (U.P.) — How four young men lived in a decompression chamber for 35 days, serving as human ‘guinea pigs’ in an experiment to test how long man can live without oxygen, was told today. The project, known as ‘Operation Everest,’ was carried out at the Exeter Clinic, Exeter, N.H., and was explained by Dr. Charles S. Houston at the annual meeting of the Aero Medical Association of the United States. The scientific significance of the experiment was to make a study of respiratory and circulatory changes that go on in the human body when there is a gradual cutting off of its oxygen supply. These four human subjects, whose names were not divulged, were chosen from a group of volunteers. Two of them asked for oxygen when an ‘altitude’ of 27,000 feet had been reached in the chamber, but two others were able to ‘take it’ for a short period of time at altitudes up to 50,000 feet — higher than the highest mountain in the world. At an ‘altitude’ of 22,000 feet, reached on the 26th day, each of the men were listless and uncomfortable. The pressure was diminished to 20,000 for two days, and then returned to 22,500. The same symptoms occurred. The 29,000 mark was reached on the 30th day, but in the meantime two of the men had asked for oxygen at 27,000 feet. The other two, however, remained at the 29,000 mark for over half an hour. On the next day, the same two men, using non-pressurized oxygen equipment, withstood 45,000 feet and then 50,000 feet for a few minutes.”

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John Carlos
Sait Serkan Gurbuz/AP
Pete Wentz
Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include journalist and commentator Bill Moyers, who was born in 1934; New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, who was born in 1941; USA Track & Field Hall of Famer John Carlos, who was born in 1945; musician and filmmaker Laurie Anderson, who was born in 1947; financial advisor and media personality Suze Orman, who was born in 1951; Iron Maiden drummer Nicko McBrain, who was born in 1952; Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy, who was born in 1953; “Matlock” star Nancy Stafford, who was born in 1954; jazz saxophonist Kenny G, who was born in 1956; singer-songwriter Brian McKnight, who was born in 1969; “Uncharted” star Mark Wahlberg, who was born in 1971; Fall Out Boy bassist Pete Wentz, who was born in 1979; and former N.Y. Jets quarterback Sam Darnold, who was born in 1997.

Sam Darnold
Adrian Kraus/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“How can you ask someone to live in the world and not have something to say about injustice?”

— track and field champion John Carlos, who was born on this day in 1945


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