Brooklyn Boro

June 1: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 1, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1868, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “LANCASTER, PA. — Ex-President James Buchanan died at his residence at Wheatland, near this city, at half-past eight o’clock this morning, after an illness of four weeks, in the seventy-seventh year of his age.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1886, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — The only decorations in the blue room, where the President will be married, will be flowers and plants. Palms will be banked against the walls and between the windows, while on the mantels will be massed cut flowers with a border of smilax. It is probable that smilax will also be twined around the chandeliers, the frames of the mirrors and the candelabra. The family dining room will also be decorated, and it is likely that the table will be ornamented by several pieces of elaborated floral architecture. The wedding will be as simple as possible. There will be no ‘best man,’ nor will there be any bridesmaid. The invited guests who will be present will be very few. All the relatives of the contracting parties have been invited, but of the President’s family only Miss Cleveland and Mrs. Hoyt, the President’s sisters, will be able to be present. Four or five of Miss Folsom’s family will be on hand, but it is not known who they will be, beyond Mrs. Folsom and Mr. Benjamin Folsom, who accompanied Miss Folsom from Europe. These, with the members of the Cabinet and their wives, Colonel and Mrs. Lamont and Mr. Watson L. Bissell, the President’s law partner, of Buffalo, and Miss Nelson, of Albany, who is at present a guest at the White House, will compose the entire number who will witness the marriage. The Marine Band, with stringed instruments, will be located in the main corridor and will furnish appropriate music.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO, ILL., MAY 31 — Nathan E. Leopold Jr. and Richard Loeb, brilliant young post-graduate students in law and members of millionaire families, who today confessed the kidnaping and murder of 14-year-old Robert Franks, also the son of a millionaire, ‘in the pursuit of adventure,’ have abandoned all pretense and signified their willingness to aid the police in reconstructing one of the most amazing as well as one of the most brutal crimes in the history of Chicago. Young Leopold is 19 years old and Loeb is 18. Both are of unusual intellectual development and have achieved scholarly attainments far beyond their years. Neither had exhibited any vicious tendencies up to the time they went calmly about the business of kidnaping and murdering a helpless boy in quest of a new thrill. The youthful murderers had no need for the $10,000 ransom they demanded of Jacob Franks, the boy’s father. They were amply supplied with money by indulgent parents, and lived in the luxurious surroundings of one of the most exclusive residential sections of Chicago. Young Loeb knew the Franks boy, had played tennis with him. There was no question of enmity. The boy was simply an innocent sacrifice to a morbid craving for a ‘thrill’ on the part of the brilliant students, according to police. Apparently both Loeb and Leopold were healthy mentally and physically, although the latter, who is said to speak 15 languages, has devoted himself to research bearing on morbid studies of sex and even made free translations of certain erotic literature of the Old World, which is suppressed from general publication.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “LADD AIR FORCE BASE, FAIRBANKS, ALASKA (U.P.) — A helicopter today lifted the broken body of George W. Argus Jr. from the side of Mt. McKinley and carried the young Brooklyn soldier to a base hospital. Argus, son of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Argus of Central Ave., Brooklyn, was flown from the 6,000-foot level of the mountain after an eight-day nightmare on the snowy peak during which he lay helpless and alone in a tent with a broken hip. Argus was taken to the 6,000-foot level point by a rescue squad that carried him in a sled from a point 4,000 feet higher. Capt. William Dallas of Dallas, Texas, piloted the plane that brought him on to safety. Officials at the base hospital reported Argus in ‘very good shape.’ He had been given morphine on the way down. The youthful soldier was in great pain as the seven-man rescue party inched its way down the mountain to the place where he was picked up by the helicopter. Argus had been left in a flimsy tent nine days ago by two other survivors of a 1,000-foot fall, which killed one of their party. The disaster occurred at the 13,000-foot level after the climbing team had conquered the 20,269-foot peak by a new route.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1956, the Brooklyn Record reported, “For the 127th year Sunday School children and grown-ups from Brooklyn’s 450 Protestant churches will march in 26 divisions throughout the famous borough on Thursday, June 7th. The first parade was held in 1829 with only four churches in the line of march. Today, according to William A. Gatehouse, President, Brooklyn Sunday School Union and chief marshal for 1956, approximately 120,000 will be marching, in the event sponsored by the Union. The Brooklyn Sunday School Union was organized in 1816  ‘to provide free religious instruction for the borough’s children.’ In 1860 the New York State legislature ruled that public schools in Brooklyn be closed for an annual ‘junior demonstration of Christianity,’ which description referred to the annual parade held in Brooklyn. Plans for this year’s Anniversary Day Parade include floats centered on the theme: ‘Christ, The Word of God,’ selected from the Revelations 19:13. In some divisions prizes will be offered for the best interpretation of the theme. Also the marchers will wear paper shoulder bands with the theme inscribed. Each of the schools marching will have a police escort and prior to the Parade Review that begins at Prospect Park, Long Meadow, at 2:45 p.m., the Brooklyn Post Office Band will present a specially planned concert for those in the stands and benches awaiting the ceremonies.”

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Morgan Freeman
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Tom Holland
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Gospel Music Hall of Famer Pat Boone, who was born in 1934; Oscar-winning actor Morgan Freeman, who was born in 1937; “Brazil” star Jonathan Pryce, who was born in 1947; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Ronnie Wood (the Rolling Stones), who was born in 1947; Country Music Hall of Famer Ronnie Dunn, who was born in 1953; “Knots Landing” star Lisa Hartman Black, who was born in 1956; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Alan Wilder (Depeche Mode), who was born in 1959; supermodel Heidi Klum, who was born in 1973; “You Oughta Know” singer Alanis Morissette, who was born in 1974; “The Walking Dead” star Sarah Wayne Callies, who was born in 1977; former N.Y. Jets wide receiver Santana Moss, who was born in 1979; “Trainwreck” star Amy Schumer, who was born in 1981; and “Spider-Man” star Tom Holland, who was born in 1996.

Amy Schumer
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The best way to guarantee a loss is to quit.”

— Oscar-winning actor Morgan Freeman, who was born on this day in 1937


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