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May 31: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 31, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1892, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle said, “The convention of the Democracy of New York state is in session at Syracuse today. It has been about settled that a contesting delegation will be sent to Chicago. The earnestness and disinterestedness of the prayers that have been addressed to that body, to send a protesting committee instead of a contesting delegation, were exemplified by the fact of the presence of a number of Senator [David B.] Hill’s personal adherents on the ground in the city of salt, urging that such a thing be done. The men in the convention appear wisely to have concluded to remain custodians of themselves, authors of their own programme and masters of their own minds. If a contesting delegation goes to Chicago, as it is now almost certain that one will go, that delegation will represent the fact that at least half a million Democratic voters in the state of New York have enrolled themselves in opposition to the methods of the mangers of the midwinter madness known as the February convention. Responsibility for the existence of a contesting delegation rests on the managers of that midwinter madness. The duty of deciding a situation thus made in this state will devolve on the Democratic national convention in Chicago. The trepidation of the machinists and the fears even of timid souled and weak kneed preferers of reform methods within Democracy are pathetic. These folk, however, will breathe more easily tomorrow than they do today, when the action of the Syracuse body shall have been duly formulated and published. The nomination of [Grover] Cleveland at Chicago would secure the re-enforcement of the state and local machines by the organization, which has been formed as a protest against the midwinter madness. Omission to nominate Cleveland at Chicago would necessitate the admission of the Syracuse delegation in whole or in part to the national convention, in order that anything like assurance of effective and united campaigning in this state might be supplied.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1922, the Eagle reported, “LONDON, MAY 31 — The whereabouts of the Mount Everest Expedition, under the leadership of Gen. Bruce, from which no word has been received in a month, is beginning to worry the friends of its members and the Royal Geographical Society. The last word received was in the form of a letter from Capt. Noel to the Society, written two days after the date of the last cablegram to The Eagle-Public Ledger Foreign Service, April 12. The letter was merely a routine report of his work as a photographer of the expedition. If the party maintained the same rate of progress made by last year’s climbers and was not held back by some caprice of the weather, it should have reached Everest itself by now. Requests have been sent to India for any information as to the location and health of the party.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO — Robert E. Crowe, State’s attorney, announced early today that Nathan E. Leopold Jr. and Richard Loeb, youthful members of wealthy Chicago families, and both post-graduate students at a university here, had confessed that they kidnaped and murdered 14-year-old Robert Franks, son of Jacob Franks, retired millionaire pawnbroker and manufacturer. They said they planned a kidnaping in great detail last November, both through a spirit of adventure and because they wanted the $10,000 ransom they demanded, said Mr. Crowe. The youths said they determined upon no definite victim and that the kidnaping and murder of young Franks was merely incidental. The kidnaping was carried out in every detail as planned, including the victim’s death, Mr. Crowe said Leopold and Loeb confessed. He said Leopold admitted writing a letter to the father of the Franks boy, demanding $10,000, and that the automobile used to spirit away their victim was a rented machine. ‘The finding of the spectacles near the boy’s body provided our only tangible clue,’ said Mr. Crowe. It was through them that the kidnaping and slaying were traced to Leopold. The typewriter used, and clothing stripped from young Mr. Franks, have not been recovered, said Mr. Crowe, but he expected to have them by this afternoon. ‘The little fellow was killed by a blow on the head and then strangled,’ State’s Attorney Crowe declared. A chisel, wrapped with tape, was used to strike the blow.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, NAPLES (U.P.) — American tanks and troops slugging it out with the Germans in a showdown battle on the slopes of the Alban Hills battered forward another hard mile today to within 15 miles or less of Rome. United Press Correspondent Reynolds Packard in a dispatch from the 5th Army front reported the new United States gains along the Rome-Anzio highway. He said the Americans to the right and British to the left also had pressed forward in violent fighting all along the 27-mile Valmontone-Jemini line athwart the approaches to Rome. United States armored units bypassed Velletri, Appian Way bastion of the German defenses, Packard reported, and the Germans were making a fierce stand at Lanuvio, which the Americans also had passed in a thrust threatening Albano, 13 miles from Rome. The great tank battle on the Alban slopes was in its fourth straight day, with Americans and Germans alike suffering casualties in men and machines. At one point a tank spearhead thrust into Nazi territory, poured lead into dugouts and pillboxes of the permanent defenses in the hills, and returned to the American lines. On the way back the Americans picked up crewmen of our damaged tanks and put them on the outside of the tanks along with German prisoners.”

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Normani
Andy Kropa/Invision/AP
Brooke Shields
Andy Kropa/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Oscar-winning director Clint Eastwood, who was born in 1930; “Cagney & Lacey” star Sharon Gless, who was born in 1943; Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Namath, who was born in 1943; “Major League” star Tom Berenger, who was born in 1949; “Trapper John, M.D.” star Gregory Harrison, who was born in 1950; “Curb Your Enthusiasm” star Susie Essman, who was born in 1955; Olympic gold medal-winning hockey player Jim Craig, who was born in 1957; “Back to the Future” star Lea Thompson, who was born in 1961; rapper Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, who was born in 1964; “Suddenly Susan” star Brooke Shields, who was born in 1965; “The Good Wife” star Archie Panjabi, who was born in 1972; “The Batman” star Colin Farrell, who was born in 1976; former N.Y. Knicks point guard Nate Robinson, who was born in 1984; and Fifth Harmony singer Normani, who was born in 1996.

Clint Eastwood
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Simplicity is the glory of expression.”

— poet Walt Whitman, who was born on this day in 1819


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