Brooklyn Boro

May 20: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 20, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1848, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “There are only 48 prisoners now confined in the Kings County jail, twelve of whom are waiting trial at the next Court of Sessions, which will sit on Monday [this] week, for the following offences, viz, burglary 2; grand larceny 6; assault with intent to kill 1; assault, with intent to ravish 1; bigamy 2. In consequence of the convicts being sent from the justices’ courts directly to the county penitentiary and workhouse, it is thought that there will shortly be rooms to let in the jail.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1861, the Eagle reported, “Southern papers falsely assert that ‘the correspondence of the Associated Press is largely controlled or dictated by Lincoln’s views and preferences,’ while they themselves are constantly publishing the most foolish and extravagant stories against the government and those engaged in the administration of its affairs.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1883, the Eagle reported, “The Old Brooklynites held a largely attended meeting last evening in the Surrogate’s Court. Mr. John W. Hunter presided and Dr. Watson recorded. Messrs. A.H. Osborn and Stephen Kidder were appointed as a committee to secure a suitable badge to be worn on the day of the opening of the [Brooklyn] bridge. Mr. Joel Conklin said that every member should pay for his badge, as there were a number of members in arrears who, therefore, were not entitled to a badge. A motion was made that every member be given a badge. Mr. Conklin objected, but the motion was adopted. Colonel W.E. Sprague was elected grand marshal, after which the meeting adjourned.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1923, the Eagle reported, “Columbia’s baseball nine swamped Wesleyan yesterday at South Field by the overwhelming score of 15-2. The victory was due largely to [Lou] Gehrig, star Blue and White twirler. Gehrig allowed only three hits. He also did some timely batting. Gehrig started the ball rolling for Columbia in the first inning when he hit his seventh homer of the season, chasing Kennedy in ahead of him. He also singled and was walked twice. The Morningsiders were in rare form, the entire team going on a batting spree for the grand total of 19 hits.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1932, the Eagle reported, “HARBOR GRACE, N.F. (AP) — Amelia Earhart Putnam, attempting the first transatlantic solo flight by a woman, landed here today at 12:31 a.m., E.D.T., after a four-hour trip from St. John, N.B. Mrs. Putnam was accompanied by Bernt Balchen, famous aviator-explorer, and by Eddie Gorski, a mechanic. The two men will assist the woman flier in preparations for the ocean hop, the destination of which she has not announced. She will await favorable weather here. She arrived at St. John last night after a flight of three and a half hours from Teterboro Airport at Hasbrouck Heights, N.J. Mrs. Putnam is the wife of George Palmer Putnam, publisher, who sponsored her flight four years ago when she and her companions landed in Wales.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “TEL AVIV (U.P.) — Huge fires were reported raging through the old walled city of Jerusalem today as Arabs and Jews battled at close quarters for control of the Holy City. British sources said artillery and mortar fire have made a shambles of the ancient heart of Christendom, site of some of the western world’s most cherished religious shrines. Heavy censorship by both Jews and Arabs clouded events of the furious battle within Jerusalem, but it appeared the old city may have to be rebuilt for the 19th time in history no matter which side is victor. Professional soldiers of King Abdullah’s Arab Legion launched an attack on the old walled city yesterday under cover of a crushing artillery barrage and by late last night appeared to have driven the Jews into a pocket in the southwest Armenian section. Jewish sources admitted that one of the fiercest fights of the Palestine War was raging amid the rabbit warrens of the Armenian section, where both the Jewish Army and Arab Legion have been reinforced for the showdown battle.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “PARIS (U.P.) — The foreign ministers of the Big Four powers began arriving here today for a crucial conference at which the Russians may seek at least a truce in the global cold war. On the eve of the Council of Foreign Ministers meeting on Germany, the Russians have tossed out suggestions on the Greek war and the Japanese problem. These come on the heels of their sudden decision to lift the Berlin blockade and made possible this new council meeting, which opens Monday. The Soviet peace offensive continued against a background of the recent Kremlin shakeup in which V.M. Molotov was replaced as Soviet Foreign Minister by his former deputy, Andrei Y. Vishinsky. The papers and speeches Vishinsky brings with him to this conference are expected to tell whether the shakeup was a prelude to a major change in Soviet tactics — from the former aggressive and obstructionist tactics toward a live-and-let-live policy.”

***

Cher
Chris Pizzello/AP
Busta Rhymes
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “General Hospital” star Constance Towers, who was born in 1933; Japanese baseball legend Sadaharu Oh, who was born in 1940; Oscar-winning actress Cher, who was born in 1946; “SCTV” star Dave Thomas, who was born in 1949; former New York Gov. David Paterson, who was born in 1954; “Relic” co-author Douglas Preston, who was born in 1956; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Jane Wiedlin (Go-Go’s), who was born in 1958; “Scandal” star Tony Goldwyn, who was born in 1960; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher David Wells, who was born in 1963; “Justified” star Timothy Olyphant, who was born in 1968; rapper and actor Busta Rhymes, who was born in 1972; “Fight Song” singer Rachel Platten, who was born in 1981; and “Game of Thrones” star Jack Gleeson, who was born in 1992.

Timothy Olyphant
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The pupil who is never required to do what he cannot do, never does what he can do.”

— philosopher John Stuart Mill, who was born on this day in 1806

 


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment