Brooklyn Boro

May 19: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 19, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1860, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The nomination of Mr. Lincoln by the Republicans is unquestionably a strong one. The party rejected Mr. Seward, because, while he was the most perfect representative of the party, he also has the greatest number of enemies to the most assailable points in his career. Experience has proved how much influence may attach to a popular catchword, and ‘honest Abe’ will doubtless be the burden of many a speech and song before election time. Mr. Lincoln, it will be recollected, was the nominee of the Republicans in opposition to Mr. Douglas in the contest for the United States senatorship, in which he was defeated. He however succeeded in carrying a majority of the popular vote.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “President Wilson, addressing a vast multitude in the Metropolitan Opera House last night, committed the United States to stand by Russia in her predicament and declared that as our first duty was to win the war, more than 5,000,000 men, if need be, would be sent across the water to wipe out the German menace. These declarations were approved with all the fervor possible by almost 5,000 persons who had wedged their way into the building. They were made when the President was sounding the keynote of the second American Red Cross war drive. When the President said that the United States stood committed to an even greater share in the war than has been borne so far, there was such approval as the opera house had not heard in its history. With his epochal utterances President Wilson electrified the big audience. His intense personal magnetism gripped every responsive chord in that gathering, and the delivery of his message to the world, though spoken to those few persons, made a stirring scene. ‘I have heard gentlemen recently say,’ said the President, ‘that we must get 5,000,000 men ready. Why limit it to 5,000,000?’ The multitude rose as one and every throat shouted an approving answer with all the lung power behind it.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “Col. William A. Dawkins announced last night that the annual Memorial Day parade this year will be along Eastern Parkway, from Ralph Ave. to Grand Army Plaza, instead of Bedford Ave., as in the past. Colonel Dawkins, head of the Spanish War Veterans in Brooklyn, will be grand marshal of the parade. Augmented by more World War II veterans than have ever participated before, marchers are expected to number between 25,000 and 30,000. They will be viewed, according to police estimate, by approximately 500,000 spectators. Colonel Dawkins said that starting at 10 a.m. from Utica Ave. and Eastern Parkway, the parade will move on Eastern Parkway past the reviewing stand at the public library, then through the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch where the marchers will disband.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, Eagle sports columnist Tommy Holmes said, “This is the weekend of the Preakness coming up and that, of course, is the dash for the second jewel in racing’s mythic triple crown. The Spring feature at the old hilltop track on the outskirts of Baltimore never has or never will capture the public imagination like the Kentucky Derby. Nevertheless, it is a distinguished race in its own right. The first Preakness was run in 1873, two years before a little red horse called Aristides captured the first Derby. Moreover, this race is held in territory far older in racing tradition than the glamorous blue-grass region of Kentucky. The first known racing trophy in America was the Annapolis Subscription Plate, run for on May 4, 1743 at the Maryland Jockey Club’s race course. There exists in the papers of George Washington a diary accounting of a day at the races at the original Maryland Jockey Club in Annapolis. That was dated 1762. Washington owned race horses and raced them against the best to be found. He traveled many miles, on horseback himself, just to see a good horse race.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1955, the Bay Ridge Home Reporter said, “The sun beamed its blessing upon 20,000 Norwegian-American paraders and some 100,000 spectators who once again proved this Sunday that Eighth Avenue is still Lapskaus Boulevard. Celebrating the 17th of May, Norway’s equivalent of our Fourth of July, the paraders marched past hundreds of Norwegian and American flags bedecking local store windows, winding up in Liev Eiriksson Square for the traditional ceremonies in front of Sons of Norway House, 641 66th St. A good part of the spotlight was held by the Viking Junior Band, resplendent in new uniforms patterned after the Norwegian national colors, red and blue with white trim. The youngsters stole the show during the parade when they broke out with music at various points along the route.”

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Grace Jones
Michel Euler/AP
Kevin Garnett
Mary Altaffer/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include original “Good Morning America” host David Hartman, who was born in 1935; “Flower Drum Song” star Nancy Kwan, who was born in 1939; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Pete Townshend (The Who), who was born in 1945; “Conan the Destroyer” star Grace Jones, who was born in 1948; College Football Hall of Famer Archie Manning, who was born in 1949; former N.Y. Yankees catcher and broadcaster Rick Cerone, who was born in 1954; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Phil Rudd (AC/DC), who was born in 1954; computer scientist and Java designer James Gosling, who was born in 1955; former N.Y. Liberty coach Bill Laimbeer, who was born in 1957; Basketball Hall of Famer and former Brooklyn Nets forward Kevin Garnett, who was born in 1976; and “Saturday Night Live” star Michael Che, who was born in 1983.

Bill Laimbeer
Jessica Hill/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“There is no better than adversity. Every defeat, every heartbreak, every loss, contains its own seed, its own lesson on how to improve your performance the next time.”

— civil rights leader Malcolm X, who was born on this day in 1925


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