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May 18: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 18, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1852, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The venerable lady of the late Hon. John Quincy Adams, formerly President of the United States, died at Washington on Saturday last, about noon. She was over 77 years of age. Mrs. Adams was a granddaughter of the late Governor Johnson, of Maryland.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1852, the Eagle reported, “Fifty five tons of the novel known as Uncle Tom’s Cabin, by Mrs. Stowe, have been printed and sold within the last two months.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1860, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO — Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, was nominated for President by the Republican Convention, on the third ballot.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “More than 3,000 members of the Norwegian colony in Brooklyn celebrated the national Independence Day of Norway at a mass meeting held last night at the Second Naval Battalion Armory, 52nd St. and First Ave. Members of the various organizations of Norway paraded and drilled in the armory, after which there was a program of speeches in which Representative John Kvale of Minnesota, Consul General Wilhelm Morgenstierne of Norway, former Congressman Fiorello LaGuardia and Hult Wilson were principal speakers. ‘Many of the ideals of freedom for which we are striving in this country today are embodied in a workable manner in the constitution of Norway, framed 119 years ago,’ Kvale said. ‘We Americans must demand the right to govern ourselves and have the courage to face unpleasant facts, meeting them with the patience of the Norwegian people, with the same lack of meekness and cowardice that is traditional with them.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1936, the Eagle reported, “Considerable doubt as to the genuineness of Bold Venture’s triumph in the Kentucky Derby was erased when the horse, this time favored, won the Preakness as a fine horse should win; Bold Venture in a ding-dong battle down the stretch, beating Granville by a nose, and coming from behind at that. At Churchill Downs he won by an eyelash or so as front runner over the highly touted Brevity. That the colt has stamina, speed and heart is thus established.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “Brooklyn tomorrow observes its first Armed Forces Day to pay tribute to all the services with a parade and patriotic ceremony in the downtown area. The borough’s military and naval stations will be thrown open to the public Saturday and the famed battleship Missouri will return for a weekend visit in Gravesend Bay, with shuttle boat service for visitors Saturday and Sunday afternoons. The Floyd Bennett Naval Air Station will present a three-hour special display of its facilities and formation, high-speed jet and precision flying Saturday afternoon. Other naval vessels will be open to the public at the Navy Yard and the Brooklyn Army Base, and Fort Hamilton also will hold open house. Hundreds of troops representing all the armed forces will take part in a parade along Fulton St. tomorrow starting at 11:30 a.m. at Albee Square. Units of the parade including high school students and veterans organizations will form at various points from Hudson Ave. to Albee Square for the march through the business section.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON, MAY 17 (U.P.) — President Truman pledged tonight a ‘no compromise’ election-year fight for his civil rights program, and risked the possibility of a Southern bolt from the Democratic party. He took his stand in a political speech before the ‘liberal’ Americans for Democratic Action convention in which he blasted the Republicans as the party of ‘reaction and fear and selfishness.’ The President predicted the election of a liberal Democratic Presidential candidate who will campaign on his controversial civil rights program and other Administration policies. And he said he was equally confident the Republicans, as usual, would defeat themselves in November by their own blunders.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “ATLANTA (U.P.) — Dixie segregationalists today formed battle lines in an effort to preserve the south’s traditional color barriers despite the U.S. Supreme Court’s historic decision that segregation in the public schools is unconstitutional. The high tribunal issued its long-awaited document yesterday. It came after months of deliberating an issue regarded as the most vital affecting one region since Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. The Supreme Court scheduled further arguments for next fall on vital issues connected with its unanimous decision and affected states were invited to submit additional briefs in the cases. Only after that will enforcement machinery be drafted. Thus, Negro and white students will not be going to school together in large areas of Dixie for perhaps many more years. The possibility of the long delay tempered reaction among white southerners which ranged from appeals for calm to blunt warnings that no court decision can overthrow segregation in the south.”

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Reggie Jackson
Chris O’Meara/AP
Chow Yun-fat
Vincent Yu/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Dallas” star Priscilla Pointer, who was born in 1924; Baseball Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson, who was born in 1946; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Rick Wakeman (Yes), who was born in 1949; Country Music Hall of Famer George Strait, who was born in 1952; “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” star Chow Yun-fat, who was born in 1955; “Toy Soldiers” singer Martika, who was born in 1969; “30 Rock” star Tina Fey, who was born in 1970; former N.Y. Mets pitcher Nelson Figueroa, who was born in Brooklyn in 1974; figure skating champion Polina Edmunds, who was born in 1998; and “We Can Be Heroes” star Hala Finley, who was born in 2009.

Tina Fey
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“I didn’t come to New York to be a star. I brought my star with me.”

— former N.Y. Yankees outfielder Reggie Jackson, who was born on this day in 1946


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