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May 28: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 28, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1845, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Greenwood Cemetery. — This beautiful City of the Dead has put on its spring attire, and become a delightful — as it always is an instructive — place of resort. We took a drive through it the other day, and noted down some of the recent improvements; but the memoranda having slipped from our possession, and all attempts to discover it proved unavailing, we are compelled to get along as best we may. The road which leads to the Cemetery has been completed, and the entrance changed to the rear of the cottage and tower, where shrubs and flowering plants are scattered about. This point is guarded by the keeper with a Cerberus-like fidelity, and no person is allowed to enter in a vehicle or on horseback without presenting his ticket. A recollection of this fact may save many parties from disappointment … Nothing can be more grateful to the care worn mortal than to steal away from office or workshop on a pleasant eve (like this) and visit the Greenwood Cemetery; and we are surprised that more of our citizens do not try the experiment.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1875, the Eagle reported, “The Local Committees of the Eastern District schools, at a meeting held last night at the library, in Fifth street, decided to dispense with Monday’s session, that teachers and children may participate in the commemorative exercises of Decoration Day.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1891, the Eagle published the following advertisement: “Every Grand Army man who expects to parade on ‘Memorial Day’ should look after his uniform, and, if needing a new suit, go to SMITH & PRESSINGER’S, where he can purchase a fast color G.A.R. suit for $8, $9, $10, $13 or $14, or separate trousers for $3 or $4. All goods sold at 607 and 609 Fulton st. warranted as represented; white military trousers $1.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1900, the Eagle reported, “Rear Admiral J.W. Philip, commandant of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, this morning brought to a successful completion his pet scheme of erecting an official flagstaff at the largest, oldest and most important navy yard in the country. The flag was raised a few minutes before 9 o’clock in the presence of naval officials and their wives, a few invited guests and a battalion of marines. This is the first time the local navy yard has had an official flagstaff, although the station is over one hundred years old.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (UP) — President Roosevelt will clarify further his historic speech of last night in which he declared an ‘unlimited emergency’ at a special press conference late today. While White House Secretary Stephen T. Early promised that Mr. Roosevelt will clarify the situation as regards naval operations to protect shipments to Britain, the President called in British Ambassador Lord Halifax for a luncheon conference. It was presumed they would discuss the President’s emergency program which brought America near the limits of undeclared war. Early declined to answer any questions regarding possible naval operations, referring all inquiries to the President for this afternoon. White House officials were swamped by a tremendous flood of mail and telegrams — so tremendous that Early said that tabulation of content, or even of numbers, has been impossible.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “The three prize-winning designs and suggestions for an appropriate Brooklyn war memorial were scheduled today to be submitted to city authorities for their consideration and possible action. In accordance with the rules of the contest staged by the Brooklyn War Memorial Board, which announced the winners during the weekend, the proposals are to be turned over to responsible officials. Sources at Borough Hall indicated that the plans would be sent in their present form to the Park Department, under Commissioner Robert Moses, and the Department of Public Works, under Commissioner Irving V.A Huie. The War Memorial Board, as explained in yesterday’s Brooklyn Eagle, arranged the contest to create a flow of ideas for a memorial to men and women of the borough who fought and died in the Second World War. Prizes worth $5,000 were made available for the competition by the Brooklyn Eagle.”

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Gladys Knight
John Shearer/Invision/AP
Alexa Davalos
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Baby Doll” star Carroll Baker, who was born in 1931; Basketball Hall of Famer Jerry West, who was born in 1938; former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who was born in 1944; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Gladys Knight (The Pips), who was born in 1944; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer John Fogerty (Creedence Clearwater Revival), who was born in 1945; “For Better or For Worse” cartoonist Lynn Johnston, who was born in 1947; 1988 National League MVP Kirk Gibson, who was born in 1957; former N.Y. Knicks forward Glen Rice, who was born in 1967; “Love at First Sight” singer Kylie Minogue, who was born in 1968; U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, who was born in 1971; former “The View” co-host Elizabeth Hasselbeck, who was born in 1977; “The Man in the High Castle” star Alexa Davalos, who was born in 1982; “Brighter Than the Sun” singer Colbie Caillat, who was born in 1985; and “The Great Gatsby” star Carey Mulligan, who was born in 1985.

Rudy Giuliani
Gerald Herbert/AP

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A LASTING BOND: Ian Fleming was born on this day in 1908. The English journalist and novelist is best known as the creator of the James Bond series, beginning with “Casino Royale” in 1953. He also wrote the children’s classic “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.” He died in 1964.

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MAN OF HONOR: Audie Murphy died on this day in 1971. Born in Texas in 1925, Murphy became one of the most decorated American combat soldiers of World War II. After the war, he had a long career as an actor, even playing himself in “To Hell and Back” (1955). He died in a plane crash in Virginia a few weeks before his 46th birthday and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“I’ll tell you what bravery really is. Bravery is just determination to do a job that you know has to be done.”

— soldier and actor Audie Murphy, who died on this day in 1971


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