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May 16: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 16, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1915, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A new departure has been inaugurated by the Commissioner of Immigration, Frederic C. Howe, for the aid and protection of immigrants and foreign-born residents in the city. It consists in the opening of an inquiry office at the Barge Office, South Ferry, to which immigrants can go for aid, information and advice. It is part of a constructive programme for extending the immigration service beyond the confines of Ellis Island, which is being worked out. In speaking of the proposal, Commissioner Howe said: ‘Nearly 80 percent of the people of New York are foreign-born or the children of foreign-born parents. They come to us from every corner of the globe. They arrive here for the most part ignorant of our institutions, unfamiliar with our laws and, aside from the voluntary private agencies, are unaided in their contact with our life. They are confronted with new problems. They are exploited. Their very ignorance leaves them prey to all sorts of people. They do not know where to go when in trouble. Often they are arrested for some trivial offense. Controversies frequently arise. They do not know where to go or how to proceed to be naturalized. They are not familiar with our educational laws or with the evening classes and other opportunities offered by the city. There are thousands of problems and difficulties which beset the immigrant on every hand.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “PIMLICO, MD. — The Preakness Stakes is to Maryland what the Derby is to Kentucky — the greatest horserace of the season. Men and women have discussed this race, pro and con, for months. If ten horses start, and at this outlook it seems likely that that number will face the barrier, its value will be close to $35,000 — the richest turf prize of the spring. The distance of the race is one mile and a quarter. One of the many interesting phases of the race is the fact that it will serve to introduce Man o’ War to the public for the first time this year. The great race horse of last year, the champion of champions, which should have gone through the season unbeaten, and which was only beaten through the stupidity of jockey [Johnny] Loftus, will sport silks for the first time this spring.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “The use of drugs may, if the results of scientific experiments now being conducted are favorable, come to an end, according to Dr. Carleton Simon, Special Deputy Police Commissioner, in charge of the Narcotic Division, who lectured last night on ‘Criminology and Narcotics’ before the Young People’s League of West Flatbush, E. 5th St. and Church Ave. Following an outline of the history of narcotics, Dr. Simon stated that ‘the hope of universal redemption from this particular vice does not rest with diplomats and statesmen whose career is a record of promises not expected to be kept but with our chemists.’ The cure, he said, is a new chemical which, although it has the same properties as the drug, does not form a habit for its use. Dr. Simon also explained the methods that the State and city are using to cure drug users. Dr. Simon denied that about 1,700 school children are addicted to the use of drugs. ‘We have yet to arrest one child addict attending school.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “HOLLYWOOD (U.P.) — Indication that all members of the Screen Actors’ Guild are not in accord with the agreement reached Sunday with the producers was seen today with the appearance of an unsigned one-page advertisement in a trade publication calling for a ‘democratic discussion’ of the agreement. The ad referred to ‘puzzling rumors’ concerning ‘last Sunday’s great victory’ and asked that the guild board, headed by Robert Montgomery, explain them at tomorrow night’s meeting. The International Association of Theater and Stage Employes, which did not support the strike of the Federated Crafts, was termed a company union and the Guild was asked to explain its alliance with it.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “The United Nations, prodded by the U.S. Congress to slap an arms embargo on Communist China, today moved to widen its proposed ban on materiel shipments to the Red regime. A resolution rushed through unanimously by the House and Senate yesterday called upon the U.N. to prohibit the shipment of arms and ‘all other materials which might add to the war-making potential’ of Red China. The U.N. General Assembly’s main political committee, summoned for a session tomorrow at Flushing Meadow Park to debate the arms embargo already approved by its 12-nation Korean sanctions committee, will receive a five-power proposal to stop shipments of needed railroad equipment to China.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — A radiant Queen Elizabeth II returned today from the first round-the-world tour ever made by a British monarch and nearly a million of her subjects gave her a tumultuous welcome … Thousands of her subjects broke through police cordons around Buckingham Palace chanting, ‘We want the Queen.’ And the Queen, her husband the Duke of Edinburgh, and their children, Prince Charles and Princess Anne, appeared on a palace balcony … Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who went aboard the yacht last night to welcome the Queen, joined the officials on the pier in their greeting to the Queen. ‘Hello, young man,’ he said as he leaned over to shake hands with Charles. The Prince plucked little Anne’s sleeve to indicate she, too, was to shake hands with the great man.”

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Janet Jackson
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Megan Fox
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include King Crimson founder Robert Fripp, who was born in 1946; “Mamma Mia!” star Pierce Brosnan, who was born in 1953; Baseball Hall of Famer Jack Morris, who was born in 1955; “Urban Cowboy” star Debra Winger, who was born in 1955; Olympic gold medal-winning runner Joan Benoit, who was born in 1957; “St. Elmo’s Fire” star Mare Winningham, who was born in 1959; “The Kids in the Hall” star Kevin McDonald, who was born in 1961; former NBA player John Salley, who was born in Brooklyn in 1964; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Krist Novoselic (Nirvana), who was born in 1965; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Janet Jackson, who was born in 1966; Pro Football Hall of Famer Thurman Thomas, who was born in 1966; New Edition singer Ralph Tresvant, who was born in 1968; “Bones” star David Boreanaz, who was born in 1969; political commentator Tucker Carlson, who was born in 1969; “Beverly Hills, 90210” star Tori Spelling, who was born in 1973; and “Transformers” star Megan Fox, who was born in 1986.

Tucker Carlson
AP photo/file

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ALL THAT JAZZ: Woody Herman was born in Milwaukee on this day in 1913. The legendary jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, singer and bandleader cut his teeth playing with bands led by others in Chicago. He formed his first band in 1936 and for the next 50 years continued to form and front talented ensembles that played in a variety of jazz styles, from blues and improvisation to bop and jazz-rock. He died in 1987.

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OSCAR, OSCAR, OSCAR: The first Academy Awards ceremony was held on this day in 1929. About 270 people attended a dinner at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel at which awards were given in 12 categories. The silent film “Wings” won Best Picture. A committee of only 20 members selected the winners that year. By the third year the entire membership of the Academy voted. The ceremony was first telecast in 1953.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“You don’t have to hold on to the pain to hold on to the memory.”

— Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Janet Jackson, who was born on this day in 1966


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