Brooklyn Boro

May 6: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 6, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — King George and Queen Elizabeth wore their heavy coronation robes and crowns at intervals today so they will be accustomed to them before the ceremonies Wednesday. King George’s health was reported excellent, setting at rest fears that pre-coronation functions might have been a heavy strain on him. All was not going so well with some of the coronation rehearsals. The Duke of Norfolk, who as hereditary Earl Marshal, must conduct the event, indicated he would continue daily rehearsals right up to the eve of the coronation. Twelve American debutantes and matrons were presented to the King and Queen last night at the first court of their reign. Led by Mrs. Homer S. Cummings, wife of the Attorney General, the Americans and 700 others made their bows in the great white and gold ballroom of Buckingham Palace. Mrs. Cummings broke precedent. She wore brilliant coronation red instead of the usual white and pastel shades. The previous courts, over which the Dowager Queen Mary presided, were restricted to less than bright colors. But Queen Elizabeth is not so exacting.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “HOLLYWOOD (AP) — Striking motion picture craftsmen appealed today for a nationwide boycott and picketing of movie theaters after rejecting a peace proposal that omitted mention of the closed shop and union recognition. Producers accepted unequivocally the terms of the peace plan, submitted by the Los Angeles Central Labor Council, American Federation of Labor group with which the striking craftsmen are affiliated. The proposal provided that: 1. All striking crafts return to work immediately without prejudice, and 2. Negotiations be conducted by representatives of each of the 11 striking unions for establishment of wage scales and working conditions. ‘The strike is still on,’ said Charles Lessing, head of the Federated Motion Picture Crafts, which called the walkout. ‘I am in no way interested in that plan of settlement. It’s a closed shop, signed, sealed and delivered, or we don’t go back to work.’ Shortly afterward, Lessing sent telegrams to general headquarters of the Painters’ Union, requesting that pickets be stationed in front of movie theaters throughout the nation. He also wired labor groups in all key cities, asking for cooperation in movie boycotting and picketing.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “The whole southern portion of New York State, including the city and eight Long Island and upstate counties, was darkened shortly after 9 o’clock last night in one of the most extensive surprise blackout drills ever undertaken in the area. Comparisons of reports from official and unofficial observers throughout the section today revealed that Brooklyn, running true to form, turned in probably the best performance of all the counties affected in the 55-minute test. The first blue signal came at 9:05 p.m., and in less than a minute the whole borough was in darkness except for street lights. Scurrying wardens quickly accounted for a few scattered recalcitrants, and business and residential areas alike became even quieter and darker than in the early morning hours. Then came the red, wavering howls of the sirens at 9:20, and promptly the street lights were extinguished, traffic was stopped and pedestrians bustled for cover. During the total blackout the sky glow from New Jersey communities became noticeable. A huge semi-circle of light spread along the horizon across the Hudson.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “TOKYO (U.P.) — Herbert Hoover said today that the food crisis is the ‘most acute the world has ever seen’ and urged that food be imported into Japan. He told a press conference, ‘Between now and September there is going to be a hungry world at the very best we can do.’ Mr. Hoover, on a worldwide tour of distressed countries as head of the U.S. Famine Committee, said the whole food situation would be helped greatly if Russia would release in China and Korea part of the foodstuffs ‘they have secured in Manchuria.’ ‘Nearly one-third of the population of the world is short of food,’ he said. ‘My mission is to prevent mass starvation between now and Sept. 1. We can succeed only if we can avoid any conflicts and by being democratic at heart. I am for feeding everyone.’ The former president said he conferred at length with Gen. Douglas MacArthur, who told him that the Japanese food situation was the worst in 30 years. ‘Japan must have some food imports,’ Mr. Hoover told the press conference. ‘Without them, all Japan will go on a ration little better than which the Germans gave the inmates of the Buchenwald and Belsen concentration camps.’”

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Gabourey Sidibe
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Willie Mays
Evan Vucci/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Baseball Hall of Famer Willie Mays, who was born in 1931; U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby, who was born in 1934; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bob Seger, who was born in 1945; “Lost” star Alan Dale, who was born in 1947; Emmy-winning actress Lynn Whitfield, who was born in 1953; “Touched by an Angel” star Roma Downey, who was born in 1960; two-time Oscar-winner George Clooney, who was born in 1961; Olympic gold medalist and Hockey Hall of Famer Martin Brodeur, who was born in 1972; former N.Y. Jets Pro Bowler John Abraham, who was born in 1978; swimmer and Olympic gold medalist Brooke Bennett, who was born in 1980; “Empire” star Gabourey Sidibe, who was born in Brooklyn in 1983; Olympic gold medalist and NBA All-Star Chris Paul, who was born in 1985; and Tony-winning actress Adrienne Warren, who was born in 1987.

Roma Downey
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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“OH, THE HUMANITY!”: The Hindenburg went down in flames on this day in 1937. The dirigible exploded at 7:20 p.m. as it approached the mooring mast at Lakehurst, N.J., after a transatlantic voyage. Of its 97 passengers and crew, 36 died in the accident, which ended the dream of mass transportation via dirigible.

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HOPE OF A NATION: Bob Hope performed his first USO show on this day in 1941. The beloved entertainer made 57 tours for the organization over the next 50 years and was declared an honorary veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces in 1997. He received the Congressional Gold Medal in 1963 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969. He died in 2003, two months after his 100th birthday.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Maybe I was born to play ball. Maybe I truly was.”

— Baseball Hall of Famer Willie Mays, who was born in this day in 1931


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