Brooklyn Boro

April 6: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

April 6, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Rejoice, ye Brooklyn fans, and deliver thanks, for our own Superbas fittingly dedicated Charles Hercules Ebbets’ magnificent stadium, the greatest ball park in these United States, by soundly trouncing Frank Chance’s Yankees yesterday afternoon to the merry tune of 3 to 2 in the presence of 25,000 wildly enthusiastic rooters, who jammed every available inch of space in the immense stadium — the greatest outpouring of baseball fanatics that ever turned out to witness an exhibition game — and at least 7,000 others, who witnessed the contest from the bluffs that loom above the field, over at Montgomery street and Bedford avenue. True, there were ten thousand or more who were turned away for lack of room, when, long before ‘Nap’ Rucker hurled the first ball over the plate, Charlie Ebbets found it impossible to squeeze another soul into the big stadium and ordered the entrances closed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Eagle reported, “NACO, ARIZ. (AP) — Shots were fired between Mexicans and United States troops here this morning. The Mexicans fired on the American soldiers, who returned the fire. Border patrolmen of Troop E, 10th U.S. Cavalry, reported to Maj. Walter Hazeltine, in command of American soldiers stationed here, that early this morning they discovered 15 sacks, each filled with five bombs, between the Southern Pacific railroad tracks and the international line. Near the tunnel of the railroad, eight miles east of Naco, American soldiers reported that as they approached the cache of explosives a patrol of Mexicans came from the Mexican side and opened fire. The American soldiers said they returned the fire and that the Mexicans fled. A private in the American patrol, whose name has not been learned, was shot through the chest. Rebel Forces of Gen. Fausto Topete this morning hurled themselves against the loyal garrison at Naco, Sonora, with a simultaneous advance of bombing planes and cavalry. The detonation of rebel aerial bombs, the booming of a field piece in the Federal garrison and the sharp crack of rifles along the Federal outposts heralded the beginning of the battle shortly after daybreak. Two airplanes dropped six bombs. Before the battle opened, residents of Naco, Ariz., were shaken from their beds by a terrific explosion and plunged into darkness by the mysterious cutting of electric lines.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1939, an Eagle editorial said, “This week the Jewish community of Brooklyn — and their fellow religionists throughout the world — are celebrating the feast of Passover with all the traditional ceremonial. It marks the liberation of Israelites from bondage in Egypt more than 3,000 years ago. Besides the religious services in the synagogues and the homes, the occasion is being appropriately marked by the distribution of Passover food to the poor by charitable, religious, political and benevolent organizations. It is only natural that rabbis in their sermons have been pointing out that Passover has an unusual and pointed significance this year because of the plight of Jews in Central and Eastern Europe due to the expansion of Nazi influence. The principles of liberty and justice on which the American Republic was founded should make impossible the appearance in this land of any discrimination because of race or creed. But even here there is need of eternal vigilance to maintain these treasured principles. The celebration of Passover only serves to re-emphasize the tyrannies of the modern Pharaoh in Germany and to awaken even deeper sympathy among all civilized peoples with the unhappy lot of the host of Jews who are today suffering the same sort of tribulations which were visited upon their forefathers in ancient Egypt.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Bay Ridge Home Reporter said, “A big moment in the history of the new Narrows Bridge will come Monday morning at 11 a.m. when Robert Moses, chairman of the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority, gives the signal to raise the first steel on the span’s Brooklyn tower. The public will be permitted to watch the ceremony from the top of the bluff near Old Fort Hamilton, inside the military reservation. Most of the activity will also be visible from vantage points along the shore. A huge crane has already been positioned to raise the 47-ton piece of steel onto the concrete foundation pedestal.”

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Marilu Henner
Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP
Billy Dee Williams
Joel C. Ryan/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include molecular biologist James Watson, who was born in 1928; “The Empire Strikes Back” star Billy Dee Williams, who was born in 1937; Oscar-winning director Barry Levinson, who was born in 1942; “Cheers” star John Ratzenberger, who was born in 1947; Baseball Hall of Famer Bert Blyleven, who was born in 1951; “Taxi” star Marilu Henner, who was born in 1952; football player and sportscaster Sterling Sharpe, who was born in 1965; “Ant-Man” star Paul Rudd, who was born in 1969; “Scrubs” star Zach Braff, who was born in 1975; actress and TV personality Candace Cameron Bure, who was born in 1976; football player and sportscaster Tim Hasselbeck, who was born in 1978; model Hilary Rhoda, who was born in 1987; World Cup-winning soccer player Julie Ertz, who was born in 1992; and “Jessie” star Peyton List, who was born in 1998.

John Ratzenberger
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

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MARCHING ON: The Grand Army of the Republic was established on this day in 1866. The fraternal organization, founded by Union veterans of the Civil War, grew to more than 400,000 members at hundreds of posts by 1890. Politically, the group advocated for voting rights for blacks, veterans’ pensions and the creation of Memorial Day as a national holiday. It was disbanded after the death of its last member in 1956.

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NOW BATTING: Baseball’s first designated hitter stepped up to the plate on this day in 1973 when Ron Blomberg of the N.Y. Yankees squared off against Luis Tiant of the Boston Red Sox. Blomberg drew a walk. The DH rule applied only to the American League until the shortened 2020 season but is now used in both leagues.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Silence and solitude are more disturbing to me than chatter and commotion.”

— actress Marilu Henner, who was born on this day in 1952


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