Brooklyn Boro

March 18: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

March 18, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1847, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Notwithstanding the blustery state of the weather, the sons of St. Patrick, both in Brooklyn and over the river, celebrated his anniversary yesterday with becoming ardor. The processions of the various Irish benevolent societies were handsome, and the display of banners, emblems, etc., imposing. All of them have declined partaking of the usual annual dinner, but generously appropriated a sum equal to the cost of such a feast, to the relief of their suffering countrymen at home.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1905, the Eagle reported, “St. Patrick’s Day in New York City was more notable this year than ever before because the president of the United States came on from Washington and made a speech to the Friendly Sons at their annual banquet held at Delmonico’s last night. The president got one of the most cordial receptions ever given him in New York and he won the admiration of every Friendly Son when he offered a toast to Patrick McDonnell, a youngster two hours old, whose father sent the following telegram to Grandfather Peter McDonnell, one of the diners: ‘Peter McDonnell, Friendly Sons of St. Patrick. Patrick just arrived, tired after parade, Sends his regrets to President.’ … President Roosevelt, before he went into his speech proper, said: ‘Now, I want you to join me in drinking the health of Patrick McDonnell and Peter McDonnell and, above all, Mrs. McDonnell.’ There was a great cheer and the grandfather hid his blushing countenance behind a napkin.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — The North Atlantic Treaty would pledge the United States in general to help Western Europe repel any Russian attack for 20 years. But at a showdown, it would bind this country to take ‘only such action as it deems necessary, including the use of armed forces.’ This was disclosed today with the first official announcement of the exact text of the proposed treaty. The text was published here and in Western Europe capitals after months of negotiating on the basic points and weeks of final polishing of the language. It would be a 20-year ‘collective defensive’ alliance of the United States, Canada and Western Europe against Soviet Russia, although Russia is not mentioned by name. It would cover territory right up to the Iron Curtain, including the Allied zones of Berlin inside the Soviet zone of Germany. An armed attack against any pact member ‘shall be considered an attack against them all.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (UPI) — The United States yesterday awaited Moscow’s formal explanation of the flight of two Soviet reconnaissance planes over Alaska. A comparatively mildly worded protest was delivered Saturday to the Soviet Foreign Ministry in Moscow. It said the United States ‘expects that the Soviet Union will take all necessary measures to prevent any repetition’ of the incident Thursday. The planes flew for a half-hour over the remote southwestern area of Alaska before returning to the Soviet Union. They were attacked by radar. U.S. F102 jets were sent aloft but they did not sight the planes visually and no shots were fired. Secretary of State Dean Rusk declined comment pending receipt of a Soviet reply to the U.S. protest note. He was interviewed before he flew to Palm Beach, Fla., to join President Kennedy. The White House also has refused to discuss the matter, saying only that the president was being kept informed of developments.”

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Sutton Foster
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Queen Latifah
Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “New York, New York” co-writer John Kander, who was born in 1927; Hockey Hall of Famer Guy Lapointe, who was born in 1948; “Child’s Play” star Brad Dourif, who was born in 1950; Ben & Jerry’s co-founder Ben Cohen, who was born in Brooklyn in 1951; Olympic gold medal-winning speed skater Bonnie Blair, who was born in 1964; Alice in Chains founder Jerry Cantrell, who was born in 1966; “Living Single” star Queen Latifah, who was born in 1970; “Younger” star Sutton Foster, who was born in 1975; football player and broadcaster Brian Griese, who was born in 1975; Maroon 5 founder Adam Levine, who was born in 1979; Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer Rebecca Soni, who was born in 1987; “Mank” star Lily Collins, who was born in 1989; and “Big Time Rush” star Ciara Bravo, who was born in 1997.

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FOREVER IN THEIR DEBT: American Express was founded on this day in 1850 with the merger of companies owned by Henry Wells, William G. Fargo and John Warren Butterfield. Originally an express mail business based in Buffalo, it introduced the American Express Traveler’s Cheque in 1891 and issued its first credit cards in 1958. Today the company has approximately 114 million cards in force, including 55 million in the U.S.

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THE GOAL STANDARD: The Stanley Cup was commissioned on this day in 1892. Awarded annually to the winner of the NHL playoffs, it was the brainchild of Lord Stanley of Preston, who served as the governor general of Canada from 1888 to 1893. Stanley, who was also known as the 16th Earl of Derby, died in 1908 and was one of the first inductees of the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1945.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“My first-grade teacher told me I was the dumbest student she ever had. She did me a favor. If she told me I was very smart, I wouldn’t have tried to improve.”

— businessman and philanthropist Ernest Gallo, who was born on this day in 1909


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