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March 7: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

March 7, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — The Department of Labor today formally announced the transfer of the Ellis Island immigration station to the Army and Navy for shelter of wounded soldiers and sailors. The immigration station, which really consists of three small islands connected by bridges, will be divided as follows, according to Acting Immigration Commissioner Uhl: The War Department will take over the inspection buildings, all of the hospitals, the nurses quarters and part of the detention centers. It will take active charge at noon tomorrow. The Navy Department has already taken part, and will soon take all of the dormitory room, the baggage room and what used to be the railroad ticket office in which immigrants bound for points inland were routed to their destinations. The Immigration Bureau will retail its present administration offices and just enough detention space to care for the small number of immigrants detained for inspection. The interned Germans, who have at times numbered several hundred, are already being moved to inland prison camps. All of them will bid farewell to the island before the week is over. So small has the immigration been of late that the Ellis Island officials have found that they can make all of the necessary first inspections right on board the ships as they come into the harbor.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Secretary of the Treasury [William H.] Woodin, acting under the terms of President [Franklin] Roosevelt’s proclamation, today directed the limited opening, immediately, of the country’s banks for the meeting of payrolls, the movement of food and ‘other essential purposes.’ At the same time he authorized the issuance, on Friday, of scrip, or clearing house certificates, to be used for money. The scrip is to be based on ‘sound assets’ of clearing house associations or similar organizations, and may be revoked if a broader plan now under consideration, the details of which have not been disclosed, is meanwhile worked out. It was also expected that a new regulation, soon to be issued, would permit depositors to withdraw up to a third of their deposits. All precautions shall be taken, according to the reopening order, to prevent hoarding or unnecessary withdrawal of cash, and no gold or gold certificates shall be paid out. Each banking institution and its directors and officers will be held accountable ‘for faithful compliance with the spirit and purpose, as well as the letter of this regulation,’ Secretary Woodin declared in the order. This sweeping relaxation of the terms of President Roosevelt’s moratorium proclamation, which closed all banks, is made in the obvious hope that sufficient cash can be got into circulation to avoid the use of scrip.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “(U.P.) — A favorite description of Red China is that its government is hungry for power but its people are just plain hungry. It’s an oversimplification and only one side of a not-very-pretty picture as drawn from such Allied listening posts as Tokyo and Hong Kong. Another side is that for all its cruelties and its crudities, there is no sign of destructive weakness inside the Red China regime. Unfortunately for the West, it is harder to see through the Bamboo Curtain than it is the Iron Curtain. More is known about inside Russia, despite the cloak of Russian censorship, than about the vast area inhabited by more than 500,000,000 persons ruled by the followers of the Red Leader Mao Tse-tung. Yet, as time goes on, it becomes essential to learn more about this Red regime against which American soldiers fought an undeclared war for more than three years and which at Geneva, on April 26, American diplomats will encounter across the conference table. The Communist Party in Red China represents only about one percent of the population and has been in power less than five years. But it has been able with one hand to fight a war in Korea and give help to the Reds in Indo-China, and with the other to extend its domination within its own boundaries down to the smallest village and farm. To the Red Chinese, Mao Tse-tung is what Lenin was to the Russians.”

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Amanda Gorman
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Laura Prepon
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include International Motorsports Hall of Famer Janet Guthrie, who was born in 1938; “Hill Street Blues” star Daniel J. Travanti, who was born in 1940; Pro Football Hall of Famer Franco Harris, who was born in 1950; Pro Football Hall of Famer Lynn Swann, who was born in 1952; “Breaking Bad” star Bryan Cranston, who was born in 1956; two-time World Series champion Joe Carter, who was born in 1960; “Tell it to My Heart” singer Taylor Dayne, who was born in 1962; “Fifty Shades of Grey” author E.L. James, who was born in 1963; “Less Than Zero” author Bret Easton Ellis, who was born in 1964; “The Upshaws” star Wanda Sykes, who was born in 1964; former N.Y. Mets second baseman Jeff Kent, who was born in 1968; Oscar-winning actress Rachel Weisz, who was born in 1970; “The Office” star Jenna Fischer, who was born in 1974; “That ’70s Show” star Laura Prepon, who was born in 1980; swimmer and Olympic gold medalist Chase Kalisz, who was born in 1994; and poet and activist Amanda Gorman, who was born in 1998.

Bryan Cranston
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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FOUNDER’S DAY: Stephen Hopkins was born on this day in 1707. The Rhode Island native served in the Continental Congress and was the second-oldest signer of the Declaration of Independence. He also served four non-consecutive terms as the governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. He died in 1785.

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THE LONG ROAD: On this day in 1965, Alabama state troopers used nightsticks and tear gas against civil rights activists who were crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma on their way to the state capitol in Montgomery. Outrage over the attack contributed to the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Poetry has never been the language of barriers; it’s always been the language of bridges.”

— poet and activist Amanda Gorman, who was born on this day in 1998


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