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January 19: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

January 19, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1922, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “ROME (A.P.) — The condition of Pope Benedict, who is suffering from a cold, is not considered serious, but he will be forced to remain in bed five or six days, it was said at the Vatican today. The cold has settled in the bronchial tubes. The correspondent was informed this morning that the Pope’s temperature had subsided to almost normal. His Holiness is eating very little and has been ordered to remain quiet. Cardinal Gasparri and other Vatican prelates are constantly near him. Cardinal Gasparri said today three things were necessary to restore his Holiness to health — ‘bed, bed, bed.’ Pope Benedict has never known what it was to be really ill. Throughout his life he has always enjoyed the best of health, and it is difficult for him to remain in bed. He kept on conducting the affairs of the Church after the first symptoms of illness appeared, until Cardinal Gasparri’s urgings were successful in inducing him to take to his bed. He was successful only after it was seen that the Pontiff’s temperature was fluctuating and that there were disquieting signs of influenza and bronchial trouble.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1936, the Eagle reported, “SANDRINGHAM, ENGLAND, JAN. 18 (A.P.) — Anxiety over the condition of King George V deepened tonight when it was announced he had showed further symptoms of a heart attack. The 70-year-old monarch is ill in Sandringham House, the royal residence, of a bronchial ailment. His illness caused growing concern throughout his far-flung empire and the world itself. A crisis may be expected in about 48 hours, a high source said tonight … When dusk fell across the Norfolk countryside, a group of anxious-eyed countryfolk, waiting at the palace gates, read with sinking hearts a late bulletin which told of a grave turn in the condition of their beloved neighbor, ‘his Majesty, the Squire.’ … The departure of the King’s two little granddaughters, the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret Rose, for London emphasized the concern felt. They had been informed that their grandfather is ‘not feeling very good’ and must have quiet and rest. They were markedly subdued when they boarded a train, with Elizabeth hugging her pet Welsh terrier, Yorky, close in her arms.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “The question of a fare increase on city transit lines is a local matter and he would ‘resent any interference from Albany,’ Mayor LaGuardia declared today. While refusing to state his opinion of the fare boost proposed by the Committee of Fifteen, a private organization, the Mayor stated his opposition to bills introduced by Assemblyman Robert J. Crews, Brooklyn Republican, and State Senator John J. Dunnigan, Bronx Democrat, which would require a referendum on any fare increase. The committee headed by former Corporation Counsel Paul Windels of Brooklyn recommended a fare boost on the basis of two rides for 15 cents, using tickets or tokens, or a single ride for 10 cents. ‘There is nothing new about that,’ LaGuardia commented. ‘There have been plenty of higher fare proposals in the past. It is just a matter of simple arithmetic. The lines cost so much to run, so much to support, and they bring in so much revenue. The question is whether the difference, the deficit, should be carried in the budget or made up out of increased revenues. The mayor said he could understand that a referendum might help in a year of a mayoralty election, ‘but it should not be held in a year when a governor is being elected.’ He pointed out that the determination of a fare increase is in the hands of the Board of Estimate.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1955, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — President Eisenhower said today he would like to see the United Nations try to use its good offices to arrange a cease-fire between the warring Chinese Reds and the Chinese Nationalists. The President agreed with a reporter that there are problems in dealing with a country — such as Red China — which acts as though solemn agreements are mere scraps of paper. Nevertheless, he told a news conference a powder keg always exists where there is fighting and that, therefore, it might be good for the UN to take a look at the Chinese fighting.”

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Dolly Parton
Wade Payne/Invision/AP
Ottis Anderson
Bill Kostroun/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “The Birds” star Tippi Hedren, who was born in 1930; “Superman II” director Richard Lester, who was born in 1932; “Coach” star Shelley Fabares, who was born in 1944; Country Music Hall of Famer Dolly Parton, who was born in 1946; chef and author Paula Deen, who was born in 1947; “Married… with Children” star Katey Sagal, who was born in 1954; comedian and singer Paul Rodriguez, who was born in 1955; former N.Y. Giants running back and Super Bowl XXV MVP Ottis Anderson, who was born in 1957; former N.Y. Knicks head coach Jeff Van Gundy, who was born in 1962; former “MADtv” star Frank Caliendo, who was born in 1974; Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, who was born in 1982; and gymnast and Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson East, who was born in 1992.

Katey Sagal
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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THAT’S SO RAVEN: Edgar Allan Poe was born on this day in 1809. Called “America’s most famous man of letters,” he is remembered for his poems ( “The Bells,” “The Conqueror Worm,” “The Raven”) and his tales of suspense (“The Tell-Tale Heart,” “The Gold Bug,” “The Fall of the House of Usher”). He died in 1849.

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THOSE WERE THE DAYS: Jean Stapleton was born in Manhattan 100 years ago today. She won three Emmys for playing Edith Bunker on the groundbreaking sitcom “All in the Family” (1971-79) and was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in 2002. She died in 2013.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“A rhinestone shines just as good as a diamond.”

— Country Music Hall of Famer Dolly Parton, who was born on this day in 1946


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