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January 4: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

January 4, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “ROME — President [Woodrow] Wilson today was received at the Vatican by Pope Benedict. The President’s arrival was announced by the Master of the Chamber to the Pope, who awaited the President in the throne room, where two gilded armchairs had been placed. The President was admitted immediately to the presence of the Pope, who was gowned in white. On his way to the throne room the President was accompanied by a procession of Vatican servants. The procession made its way through halls filled with antique pictures and precious tapestries. As the President entered the antechamber to the Papal apartments he was preceded by the Pontifical Chamberlain. Gendarmes in immense busbys and the Palatine Guard and the Noble Guard in their red tunics were drawn up to greet him.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Senate Republicans planned to end the Bilbo filibuster by persuasion today or to break it by force next week if Southern Senators refuse to permit a vote on the resolution to bar the man from Mississippi. Republican leaders threatened day and night sessions next week if today’s extraordinary Saturday session doesn’t bring a solution. Test votes indicated a mixed majority of Republicans and Democrats desired to vote now to bar Senator Theodore G. Bilbo from the Senate. The majority was stymied by insistence of a small group of Southern Senators that Bilbo be seated pending further consideration of charges brought against him. Republicans want to bar him pending further consideration. The 80th Congress, which convened yesterday with Republicans controlling for the first time since 1932, was handcuffed by the filibuster over procedure. At the other side of the Capitol, the House was ready for business. The Senate was unable to organize for business by swearing in new members and electing its presiding officer.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “The straphangers’ dilemma will be the subject of a debate during the next luncheon meeting of the Women’s City Club on Monday, Jan. 19. How can the plight of the weary, jostled and irritated New Yorker who has to ride the city’s subways be alleviated? Is the answer to New York City’s desperate transportation problem the establishment of a transit authority? These are some of the questions to be discussed by Paul Windels, former Corporation Counsel, who takes the affirmative side, and Rudolph Halley, President of the City Council, who takes the negative stand.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “(U.P.) — The list of the world’s best dressed women, an elite group of upper income shoppers who usually act more embarrassed than pleased, is minus some familiar names this year. The Duchess of Windsor dropped from her perennial first place to a 10th place tie with singer Mary Martin … The Duchess of Windsor came in for her first fashion accolade from Paris designers when she married the former King of England in 1937. Women often show up on the list the same year their names appear on front pages … ‘The Duchess does not mind,’ her private secretary said, ‘but she wondered why she had dropped so badly when she has changed nothing in her manner of dressing. We can’t understand any reason for this change unless other women have suddenly become a lot smarter.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “(UPI) — Frank Gifford, who ended a one-year retirement, mastered a new position and played a big part in the New York Giants’ fine season, today was honored by United Press International for the 1962 Comeback-Of-The-Year in the National Football League. The handsome halfback’s career appeared ended exactly two years ago at this time when he was sent to the hospital with a severe concussion after being hit hard by Chuck Bednarik in a game against the Philadelphia Eagles. Gifford sat out the 1961 season and earned a comfortable living as a radio broadcaster and a model for television commercials and magazine advertisements. But as Gifford put it, ‘retiring was a big mistake.’ ‘I had to get back,’ he said. ‘Football is my life.’”

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Michael Stipe
Matt Licari/Invision/AP
Julia Ormond
Greg Allen/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “It Came from Outer Space” star Barbara Rush, who was born in 1927; “Heaven Can Wait” star Dyan Cannon, who was born in 1937; historian and commentator Doris Kearns Goodwin, who was born in Brooklyn in 1943; businesswoman and fashion designer Tina Knowles, who was born in 1954; actress and performance artist Ann Magnuson, who was born in 1956; former NBA player Sidney Green, who was born in Brooklyn in 1961; country singer Patty Loveless, who was born in 1957; “Max Headroom” star Matt Frewer, who was born in 1958; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Michael Stipe (R.E.M.), who was born in 1960; “NewsRadio” star Dave Foley, who was born in 1963; “Sabrina” star Julia Ormond, who was born in 1965; country singer Deana Carter, who was born in 1966; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher Ted Lilly, who was born in 1976; and “Sex Education” star Emma Mackey, who was born in 1996.

Dave Foley
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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HIGHER LEARNING: Sir Isaac Newton was born in England on this day in 1643. The chief figure of the scientific revolution of the 17th century, he laid the foundations of calculus, studied the mechanics of planetary motion and discovered the law of gravitation. He died in 1727.

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IT’S A HIT: The pop music chart was introduced on this day in 1936 when Billboard magazine published a list of bestselling records for the week that ended Dec. 30, 1935. It included songs by the Tommy Dorsey and Ozzie Nelson orchestras.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Sure, luck means a lot in football. Not having a good quarterback is bad luck.”

— Pro Football Hall of Fame coach Don Shula, who was born on this day in 1930


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