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November 25: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

November 25, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1870, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “Our paper this afternoon is considerably occupied by a narration of the many ways in which Brooklyn observed Thanksgiving yesterday. It will be seen that the forms which religion and recreation took pretty well reflected the many phases of conviction and impulse of which our people are compounded. The record is a not uninteresting and a not inadequate exhibition in action of the varied and energetic force that goes by the name of American character. Of the observance, it can be truly said, that if it was varied, it was also general. Probably, no nationality and no social condition woven into the woof of our life failed to feel the quietude, if not the inspiration, of the occasion. It touched the stomach or the sentiment of us all. The population of this land, with fewer holidays than any other population, always make much of them when they come, not more because they are few, than because the intense existence in being and business here impels us to prosecute even our pleasures with electric zest.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Eagle reported, “In the opinion of Police Commissioner Arthur Woods, the improper use of habit-forming drugs can never be adequately suppressed until the National Government itself takes over their manufacture and distribution. Commissioner Woods made this statement in a letter sent yesterday to G.E. Fletcher, Deputy Commissioner of Internal Revenue, in Washington, in answer to a letter requesting suggestions as to what legislation is needed to give the Government proper control of the manufacture and distribution of habit-forming drugs. That the Government may not be prepared to take the step he advocates and that Constitutional objections might bar the way Commissioner Woods admits, but he states it as his belief that the absolute suppression of the illicit traffic in drugs can be accomplished in no other way. ‘The menace now is great, and is likely to become greater,’ he says in his letter. ‘Regulative measures can only mitigate the evil — they cannot eradicate it when profits to the illicit dealer are large and evasion of the law so easy.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Administration has decided to try to implement its price control legislation with an amendment empowering the price administrator to ban any wage increases which he found inflationary, a House leader revealed today. The Administration’s decision to seek limited wage control as part of its program to combat inflation presumably was made known to Congressional leaders at last night’s White House conference on labor. Democratic Leader John W. McCormack announced after that conference that price control had been discussed. The House Banking Committee today adopted an amendment which would restore to the bill a controversial section permitting the administrator to buy and sell commodities on the open market in order to stabilize prices. The vote was reported as 14 to 8. Meanwhile, the House Labor Committee directed its ranking member, Representative Robert F. Ramspeck (D., Ga.), to prepare legislation embodying the ‘understanding’ reached at a conference among House members and President Roosevelt last night. Ramspeck announced he would complete the bill soon and that the committee could report it to the House on Friday.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “PITTSBURGH (U.P.) — Steel production and passenger train service were cut 25 percent today as the first move in the drive to conserve the nation’s dwindling stockpile of coal. Thousands of workers already were idle as a result of the strike of 400,000 soft coal miners and industry spokesmen estimated that more than 1,000,000 persons would be unemployed by the end of the week. In Pittsburgh alone, 100,000 workers faced layoffs this week. Already 1,200 truckers and 500 barge workers have been made idle by the walkout of miners. Every industry in the nation that uses coal and hundreds of other allied industries faced a crisis that will continue until the coal strike is settled. The steel industry and railroads, two of the nation’s biggest coal consumers, were the first to put conservation measures into effect. But a third big user, the power companies, will slash production tonight when dimouts become effective in 21 Eastern states and the District of Columbia.”

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Katie Cassidy
Chris Pizzello/Invision
Donovan McNabb
Michael Perez/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include actress and singer Kathryn Crosby, who was born in 1933; Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Gibbs, who was born in 1940; actor and political commentator Ben Stein, who was born in 1944; journalist Gail Collins, who was born in 1945; “Night Court” star John Larroquette, who was born in 1947; former “Uncanny X-Men” writer Chris Claremont, who was born in 1950; singer-songwriter Amy Grant, who was born in 1960; Pro Football Hall of Famer Cris Carter, who was born in 1965; “Crossing Jordan” star Jill Hennessy, who was born in 1968; “Married… with Children” star Christina Applegate, who was born in 1971; former NFL quarterback Donovan McNabb, who was born in 1976; former N.Y. Yankees outfielder Nick Swisher, who was born in 1980; activist Barbara Bush, who was born in 1981; author and journalist Jenna Bush Hager, who was born in 1981; former N.Y. Knicks forward Jared Jeffries, who was born in 1981; and “Arrow” star Katie Cassidy, who was born in 1986.

Ben Stein
Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

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CENTER STAGE: Joe DiMaggio was born on this day in 1914. The graceful centerfielder, who debuted with the N.Y. Yankees in 1936, was a three-time American League MVP and nine-time World Series champion. In 1941, he hit in a record 56 consecutive games. He retired after the 1951 season and had a brief marriage to screen star Marilyn Monroe. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955 and died in 1999.

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SMILES, EVERYONE: Ricardo Montalban was born on this day in 1920. He was a leading man in his native Mexico before he moved to Hollywood. Frustrated with “Latin lover” roles, he took parts on TV, most famously as the mysterious Mr. Roarke on ABC’s “Fantasy Island.” He also played Khan Noonien Singh in an episode of “Star Trek: The Original Series” and in the film “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.” He died in 2009.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Politics is too partisan, and sometimes patriotism is cast aside.”

— actor Ricardo Montalban, who was born on this day in 1920


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