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November 23: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

November 23, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1890, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Thanksgiving day, in the natural course of events, is due on Thursday. So is the great American bird, the turkey, and the greatest of all promoters of indigestion, mince pie. The horrors of the old-time nightmare which antediluvian tales tells us about are strangers to modern times, when balls, parties and other equally nice things are invented to make a fitting climax to the great holiday. There is almost as much patriotism manifested on Thanksgiving day as on the Fourth of July. Many courageous small boys go so far as to ring in fireworks and whistles and bells. Others observe it with a reverence corresponding to that on Christmas, and parade the streets in as grotesque a fashion as possible, soliciting gifts — or prizes, as they are called — to be eaten at night. All the factories are closed, the business places shut their doors, the busy wharves are deserted, the city officials take a day off, and the bulls and bears on Wall street let up on lamb and subsist on fowl for a short period. All spend the day in enjoyment. Some go to theaters, others visit their country relatives and those who are less fortunate go to the outskirts of the city. The sport loving people see various outdoor games and there are any number of them. A certain class is not so lucky. These are the unfortunate car conductors and drivers, who never get a holiday. They have their turkey, nevertheless; everybody gets that.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1898, the Eagle reported, “Unless there is a marked change in the weather during the next twenty-four hours, Poly and High School will play their annual foot ball game in Washington Park tomorrow under very disagreeable conditions. The presence of rain and mud makes comparatively little difference to the players, used as they are to exposure, but it is frequently more than a side consideration with the prospective spectator and it remains to be seen whether the ardor of the local rooter on Thanksgiving Day will stand the test of a storm. It is, of course, by no means certain that bad weather will prevail tomorrow, as the precedents of the last five years all favor sunshine, so despite the dubious signs, the first Thanksgiving Day game at New Washington Park may be played on a dry gridiron after all. If not, it will be the first time since 1892 that rain has placed a handicap upon the Poly-High School game. Yesterday the employees of the Brooklyn Baseball Club began work on the big field, but whatever lines were completed will have to be touched up anew before the match, as no lime can withstand a soaking like today’s and still preserve its freshness.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “First and foremost among the events of the Thanksgiving season is the Debutante Ball which will take place on Wednesday evening at the Heights Casino. Interest in this ball has surpassed that of many dances of long standing even though this event made its ‘bow’ only last year. Last year’s event was arranged by the debutantes of 1923-24, and it was they who received. This same group has again come forward to assist Mrs. Ira B. Downs in the management, only this time they are working for the debutantes of the present season who will be on the receiving line. The ball is therefore a rather pretty compliment significant of an exchange of the courtesies of leadership in the younger set.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle reported, “The Lions’ victory, before a national television audience and an overflow Thanksgiving Day crowd of 57,598 at Tiger Stadium, set up a close finish in the Western Division race with three games left to play. Detroit now is 9-2, compared to the Packers’ 10-1 record, and the Lions entertain a flicker of hope that the Packers can be beaten again. Had the Packers won, they would have clinched at least a tie for their third straight division title. The sellout crowd, the largest Thanksgiving Day crowd in Detroit history, sat in astonishment as the Lions completely dominated the game for more than three quarters with fierce line play and a crackling offense that rolled up a 23-0 halftime lead.”

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Miley Cyrus
Chris Pizzello/AP
Robin Roberts
Evan Agostini/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former baseball manager Jack McKeon, who was born in 1930; Oscar-winning screenwriter Robert Towne, who was born in 1934; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher Luis Tiant, who was born in 1940; comedy writer Bruce Vilanch, who was born in 1948; Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer, who was born in Brooklyn in 1950; “Mandolin Rain” singer Bruce Hornsby, who was born in 1954; “Good Morning America” anchor Robin Roberts, who was born in 1960; actor and director Danny Hoch, who was born in Brooklyn in 1970; former N.Y. Knicks center Vin Baker, who was born in 1971; “Talking Dead” host Chris Hardwick, who was born in 1971; actor and musician Page Kennedy, who was born in 1976; former N.Y. Mets infielder Justin Turner, who was born in 1984; and “Hannah Montana” star Miley Cyrus, who was born in 1992.

Charles Schumer
Patrick Semansky/AP

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WHAT’S UP, DOC?: “Doctor Who” premiered on British TV on this day in 1963. Traveling through time and space, the Doctor and his companions found themselves in mortal combat with creatures such as the Daleks. The series aired until 1989 and attracted a huge cult following when it debuted in the U.S. in 1975. A new version of the series began in 2005.

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BY THE NUMBERS: Today is Fibonacci Day, which celebrates the Fibonacci sequence in mathematics: a string of numbers where each number is the sum of the preceding pair of numbers. In the American shorthand of expressing dates, Nov. 23 is 11/23, and 1+1=2; 2+1=3. Leonardo Fibonacci (1170-1240) described the sequence in his 1202 treatise Liber abaci.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“If things get too much for you and you feel the whole world’s against you, go stand on your head. If you can think of anything crazier to do, do it.”

— comedian Harpo Marx, who was born on this day in 1888


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