Brooklyn Boro

What’s Breaking, News: Tuesday, November 15, 2022

November 15, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle Staff
Share this:

SENTENCED IN ATTEMPTED ARSON OF NYPD VAN: United States District Judge Dora L. Irizarry in Brooklyn federal court today sentenced Samantha Shader to 72 months’ imprisonment for using an improvised incendiary device, commonly known as a “Molotov cocktail,” in an attempt to set fire to a New York City Police Department (NYPD) at a protest in Brooklyn. Ms. Shader, who pleaded guilty to the charge in April, was involved in the May 29, 2020 protest following the death of George Floyd in police custody.

Defendant told a co-conspirator of her intention to “go down to the city to cause some hell” during protests following the murder of George Floyd. Last year, Floyd’s murderer, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, was convicted and is serving a 21-year-prison sentence.

✰✰✰

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

HAND-TATTOOED MALE SOUGHT IN BENSONHURST ROBBERY: The NYPD is asking anyone spotting an individual with these distinctive hand tattoos are to assist them in tracking down the individual regarding a robbery that took place on October 24, within the 62nd Precinct, which serves Bath Beach, Bensonhurst and Mapleton. Just after 12:30 a.m. that morning, the unidentified male individual did enter the SRR Convenience store located at 315 Kings Highway, displayed a large knife and demanded money, and removed cash from the register, and cigarettes and a cell phone.

The assailant (whose tattooed hand, bearing words like “hope” is pictured here) is a light-complected male, approximately 30 to 40 years of age, with black hair and last seen wearing all black clothing and black face covering.

Tattoo on the perpetrator’s left hand.
Photo credit: NYPD/Crimestoppers

✰✰✰

BREAKING: COLLISION TIES UP BELT PARKWAY: Due to a vehicle collision, there are extensive eastbound traffic delays on the Belt Parkway at Erskine Street, near the Gateway Center shopping plaza in Brooklyn.

Commuters should consider alternate routes and allow for additional travel time.

✰✰✰

BROOKLYN DA: MAJOR GANG STING OPERATION NETS 106 COURT CHARGES: Thirty-two alleged members of two rival Brownsville-based gangs – named WOOO and CHOO — are charged with 106 counts, including conspiracy to commit murder, Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez and NYPD Commissioner Keechant Sewell announced today. The indictments include charges related to 19 shootings that resulted in 14 victims, including two who died as a result of their injuries. Innocent bystanders, including a 3-year-old girl who was leaving daycare, were wounded in the charged shooting incidents.

These indictments are the result of a long-term investigation that ran from Spring 2020 until this month, and that focused on two gang confederacies that operate out of several neighboring housing complexes in Brownsville, District Attorney Gonzalez said.

✰✰✰

NYC’S CHINESE-AMERICAN COUNCIL AWARDED GRANT FROM MACKENZIE SCOTT: The Chinese-American Planning Council, considered the nation’s largest Asian American social services organization, is the latest to receive a grant from billionaire philanthropist and author MacKenzie Scott, although the amount wasn’t immediately disclosed. This one-time grant will be used to support the organization’s ongoing efforts to promote staff development, expand essential programming, and strengthen organizational infrastructure.

Just last week this newspaper reported that MacKenzie Scott had donated $11 million to the Ascend charter school system in Brooklyn, which will utilize the gift to open up new facilities in central and east Brooklyn: Flatbush, Cypress Hills and Brownsville.

✰✰✰

CAMBA RECEIVES $3.3 MILLION GRANT TO HELP RESETTLING UKRAINIANS: Brooklyn-based CAMBA was awarded $3,377,068 in a round of grants to 17 refugee services providers around the state to assist displaced Ukrainians who have fled their country as a result of Russia’s military invasion and are now living in New York, Gov. Kathy Hochul announced today. This new funding, from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement, will be used to supplement the existing efforts to provide support services through Uniting for Ukraine, and encompassing employment assistance, case management, skills training, English as a second language, and, when necessary, housing and food assistance among others.

CAMBA, founded 45 years ago in 1977, is the well-known acronym for Church Avenue Merchant Block Association, a merchant association in Flatbush working to reduce crime and beautify the community.

✰✰✰

NEW YORK WILL GET $20 MILLION FROM GOOGLE IN DATA TRACKING AGREEMENT: New York users of Google’s many accounts, including Google Chrome, maps and search may be relieved to know that State Attorney General Letitia James, as part of a coalition of 40 attorneys general, today has secured $391.5 million from Google for misleading them about its location data tracking. A multistate investigation found that Google failed to notify users that location tracking services were automatically turned on for web and app activity, even though Google had informed consumers they could turn off location tracking under “location history” in their settings.

Monday’s historic $391.5 million agreement with Google requires the tech company to also reform its practices to be more transparent with consumers, and to pay New York its portion —more than $20 million —from the agreement. 

✰✰✰

CRACKDOWN ON DIRECT SALES OF AMMUNITION: The Office of the New York State Attorney General has identified and cracked down on 39 ammunition sellers — including two based in this state — for illegally sending ammunition to New York residents. The ammunition was shipped directly to New York residents, in violation of New York’s SAFE Act, which prohibits direct online sales of ammunition to New York residents, requiring instead that such sales to be conducted in person between a licensed firearms dealer or registered seller and a customer, and that sellers create and maintain a record of every ammunition transaction in New York that includes the age, occupation, and residence of any buyer.

Attorney General James warned sellers that such violations could carry penalties of up to $5,000 for each individual violation and may subject them to disgorgement of all income resulting from these illegal sales.

✰✰✰

LEGAL AID SOCIETY: JAIL REFORM FAILED; APPOINT A RECEIVERSHIP: The Legal Aid Society and the law firm co-counsel Emery Celli Brinckerhoff Abady Ward & Maazel filed papers yesterday, calling the city’s jail reform plans a failure. This comes in response to what Legal Aid and co-counsel assert is the City’s continued inability to comply with the core requirements of the court-ordered relief in Nunez v. City of New York, litigation concerning brutality and excessive force in New York City jails, despite seven years of intensive monitoring and four successive remedial orders.

Legal Aid and Co-Counsel declared their intention to file a motion for contempt and, by December 15, the appointment of a receivership, considered in law to be a remedy of last resort and are related to either an enforcement of a security or compliance interest or to insolvency.

✰✰✰

FIRST BLACK WOMAN APPOINTED TO CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE JUDGE ROLE: Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence K. Marks, second in command of the New York court system has announced his retirement at the end of November, just three months after Chief Judge Janet DiFiore’s own retirement, the New York Law Journal reported on Monday. Judge Tamiko Amaker, who was named acting chief administrative judge, effective December 1, will become the first Black woman in this role. Judge Amaker, as the deputy chief administrative judge for management support of the Unified Court System since January 2022, has worked closely with Judge Marks on the trial court system’s operation.

Judge Marks, who has served 31 years in the court system and 7 1/2 years as the second-longest-serving chief administrative judge, is not due for mandatory retirement. Rather, he sensed the time was right to move on,  court system spokesman Lucian Chalfen told the Law Journal.

✰✰✰

APPLICATIONS OPEN FOR GREEN-WOOD CEMETERY’S RESEARCH GRANTS: The Green-Wood Cemetery is offering two research grants, with funding of up to $4,000 each, to emerging investigators in the fields of urban environmental science and human-nature interactions. Each grant provides support for emerging investigators (graduate students, early-career faculty, NGO-affiliated staff, and others trained in relevant fields) to conduct original research utilizing Green-Wood’s location, landscape, and extensive institutional records. Special consideration may be given also to advanced undergraduate students who apply.

Applications are due on January 15, 2023 (visit https://www.green-wood.com/research-opportunities/ or contact [email protected] ) for the Green-Wood Research Award in Urban Environmental Science, or for the Green-Wood Research Award in Human/Nature Interactions, applicants may propose any project that spans the natural, social, and health sciences, and landscape design fields, among others.

✰✰✰

NYC SCHOOLS USING FEWER FUNDS TO CLOSE PANDEMIC LEARNING GAPS: There are sizeable differences in how school districts around New York State are using $8.6 billion in federal pandemic relief funds, according to an analysis that State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli released yesterday. The analysis, which examined New York City, Yonkers, Buffalo, Syracuse and Rochester —the “Big Five” school districts in New York, as well as national peer school districts — found that the New York City Department of Education plans to use a smaller share of the billions of dollars of its federal aid  to help close pandemic learning gaps than other large school districts, both in New York and nationwide.

DiNapoli’s report found that academic recovery, geared to help those students whose educations were interrupted, initially received 16.5 percent of New York City’s ESSER III funding, falling short of the 20 percent minimum required by law.

✰✰✰

BROOKLYNITES CRITICIZE NEW LINKNYC WiFi TRANSMITTER TOWERS: Brooklynites are criticizing the new 32-foot-tall LinkNYC transmitters that have been installed on sidewalks around Brooklyn and other boroughs, calling the towers “monstrosities,” reports Brownstoner and the Brooklyn Paper. These transmitters, which are the next generation model of the LinkNYC WiFi kiosks, about 147 of which are expected to be installed in Brooklyn, are part of a partnership between LinkNYC and the NYC Office of Technology and Innovation  to expand high bandwidth cell and Internet service throughout the five boroughs.

However, Brooklynites in Downtown Brooklyn, on Myrtle Avenue, in Prospect Heights, claim that neither they nor their respective community boards or City Councilmembers were consulted about the design or placement of the new kiosks, even though a NYC OTI spokesperson said the Public Service Commission last year completed the procedures that included public hearings and outreach to all community boards, borough presidents and council members.

✰✰✰

NEW HOUSING REFORMS WILL PROVIDE SMOOTHER EXIT FROM SHELTER SYSTEM: A package of major new housing reforms aims to help New Yorkers exit the shelter system — or avoid it entirely —Mayor Eric Adams announced today. The reforms, which would help people and move more quickly into permanent affordable housing, including in higher-income neighborhoods that have long been out of reach for lower income families, include significant improvements to the City Family Homelessness and Eviction Prevention Supplement (CityFHEPS) housing voucher program that will ensure more New Yorkers are eligible for the program and make the voucher more flexible

The package includes a groundbreaking pilot program — “Street to Housing” — that will place New Yorkers experiencing unsheltered homelessness directly into supportive housing; and a major expansion of the city’s housing mobility program, which helps families with federal housing vouchers access apartments in more neighborhoods across the five boroughs.

✰✰✰

INVESTIGATION OPENS ON CONEY ISLAND SHOOTING: The New York Attorney General’s Office of Special Investigation is examining an incident that took place last Thursday in Coney Island between members of the NYPD and an alleged gunman. Responding to an incident near the intersection of Neptune Avenue and West 36th Street in Brooklyn. NYPD officers encountered the man, identified as Jermaine Hickson, who allegedly started firing his gun in their direction (the weapon was recovered from the scene).

The officers returned fire, and then performed first aid until EMS arrived and pronounced Hickson dead at the scene, leading to the OSI’s opening the investigation, pursuant to New York State Executive Law Section 70-b.

✰✰✰

CITY WORKFORCE DECLINES BY 19,000; LARGEST ATTRITION WITHIN CORRECTION DEPT: New York City’s workforce is down by more than 19,000, representing the largest decline since the Great Recession of 2008, says a new report from State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Attrition outpaces hiring among New York City’s municipal workforce, with city job vacancies standing  at more than 21,000 — notwithstanding the hiring of more than 40,000 new employees in the last fiscal year.

The Department of Correction had the greatest loss of employees with a 23.6 percent decline, followed by the Department of Investigation at 22.2 percent and the Taxi & Limousine Commission at 20.5 percent.

✰✰✰

RECORDS SOUGHT OF FOREIGN LEADERS VISITING TRUMP HOTEL IN WASHINGTON: Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, chair of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, has requested of the National Archives and Records Administration presidential records to determine whether former President Trump distorted United States foreign policy to serve his own financial interests, in violation of his oath of office.  The request comes as the Committee released new documents obtained from Mr. Trump’s former accounting firm, Mazars USA LLP, which revealed that foreign governments—including the governments of Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, and the People’s Republic of China—spent more money than previously known at the Trump Hotel in Washington, D.C., and did so at sensitive times for those countries’ relations with the United States.

The documents were obtained from a subpoena issued by the late Chairman Elijah E. Cummings during the 116th Congress regarding investigations into former President Trump’s conflicts of interest, inadequate financial disclosures, and violations of the Emoluments Clauses.

✰✰✰

‘WILD THINGS’ WINS BPL’S ‘MOST-CHECKED-OUT’ CONTEST: The most checked-out book in the 125-year history of the Brooklyn Public Library is Maurice Sendak’s classic children’s story, “Where the Wild Things Are.” The Brooklyn Public Library announced the top in-demand book (view the entire list at https://www.bklynlibrary.org/125/most-borrowed)  in culmination of its 125th anniversary celebration, starting in October with its125th Most Borrowed Book of All Time, “Are You There, God? It’s Me Margaret,” featuring a special video greeting from author Judy Blume.

Originally published by Harper & Row in 1963, “Where the Wild Things Are” unfolds the story of Max, under bed-without-supper punishment for wreaking havoc in his household, who becomes king in an imaginary land. To honor the book, BPL will honor the top book selection with a Wild Rumpus celebration on Saturday, December 3 at its Central Library, with special guest Julian Shapiro-Barnum, of “Recess Therapy” fame.

 


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment