Brooklyn Boro

November 5: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

November 5, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1898, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The enthusiasm that greeted Colonel [Theodore] Roosevelt during his trip last evening exceeded even that with which he was welcomed during his two previous visits to Brooklyn. It was a triumphal procession from the start to the finish, when it ended in a reception at the Brooklyn Rink, given by thousands of men and women, who when he entered shouted, cheered, waved flags and handkerchiefs for fully ten minutes and would have continued longer had he not commanded silence by commencing his speech, which was frequently interrupted with applause and cheers. The candidate did not talk very long at any of the meetings, the reason being that the tremendous strain to which he has been subjected during his continuous and active campaign made it necessary for him to conserve his strength in order that he might complete the tour which he has undertaken and which will end on Monday night.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Eagle reported, “Predictions of victory in the state were forthcoming from the campaign directors of both parties today as the candidates for governor made their final speeches. Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Democratic nominee, and his opponent, Attorney General Albert Ottinger, are both speaking in the Hudson Valley counties today … Roosevelt’s schedule for today calls for an open air meeting at Beacon at 11:45, another open air meeting in Newburgh across the Hudson an hour later and an afternoon meeting at Kingston at 3 o’clock, after which he will return to his home, Crum Elbow, at Hyde Park. Tonight he will address his neighbors at a meeting at Hyde Park at 7 o’clock, motoring from there to the final rally of his campaign, to be held in Poughkeepsie and broadcast over station WOKO.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “Full power to enact Republican reapportionment of the state’s legislative districts became one of the additional consequences of the GOP election sweep today as Governor-elect [Thomas] Dewey began a study of the Albany setup preparatory to ‘streamlining’ state offices. The avalanche of votes which wiped out the Democratic party’s traditional majorities in New York City extended complete Republican control of both branches of the Legislature for the next two years while putting Dewey in the Executive Mansion for four years beginning Jan. 1. All indications today were that Queens, which rolled up a plurality of more than 30,000 votes for Dewey and which has received his pledge of cooperation for the enactment of redistricting, would lead the drive in the incoming Legislature for the passage of a measure revising senatorial and assembly districts. An attempt to put through a reapportionment bill at the 1942 session of the Legislature was blocked, although a congressional bill, effective in 1944, was passed and signed by Governor [Herbert] Lehman. The period of 1921-22 was the most recent one when the Republican party found itself in control of both the governor’s office and both houses of the Legislature.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle reported, “Election day is tomorrow and all polls will open at 6 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. This being a non-presidential year, experts do not expect a large turnout. In the past Brooklyn has polled about 40 percent of the eligible vote, and it is expected that the same will hold true tomorrow. However, some authorities believe the borough may come through with as high as 60 percent. There are nearly 1.5 million eligible voters in Brooklyn. The big battle this year is for governor. Democratic Party candidate Robert Morgenthau is opposing Republican incumbent Nelson A. Rockefeller. Both candidates have been campaigning throughout the state and have often taken to the sidewalk seeking support. Four years ago this type of electioneering is believed to have won Rockefeller New York City, and the best guess is that it will do it again. Although the state is largely Democratic, especially Brooklyn, predictions are that Morgenthau will lose to another Rockefeller landslide.”

***

Tilda Swinton
Evan Agostini/AP
Judy Reyes
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “A Shot in the Dark” star Elke Sommer, who was born in 1940; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Art Garfunkel, who was born in 1941; former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Peter Pace, who was born in 1945; Herman’s Hermits founder Peter Noone, who was born in 1947; Basketball Hall of Famer Bill Walton, who was born in 1952; “To Die For” author Joyce Maynard, who was born in 1953; “Terminator 2” star Robert Patrick, who was born in 1959; “Summer of ’69” singer Bryan Adams, who was born in 1959;  Oscar-winner Tilda Swinton, who was born in 1960; Oscar-winner Tatum O’Neal, who was born in 1963; “X-Men” star Famke Janssen, who was born in 1964; “Scrubs” star Judy Reyes, who was born in 1967; Oscar-winner Sam Rockwell, who was born in 1968; former N.Y. Yankees outfielder Johnny Damon, who was born in 1973; and former N.Y. Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr., who was born in 1992.

Robert Patrick
Chris Pizzello/AP

***

BREAKING NEWS: John Peter Zenger published the New York Weekly Journal for the first time on this day in 1733. He was arrested and imprisoned for libel on Nov. 17, 1734. The trial remains an important landmark in the history of the struggle for freedom of the press.

***

SHATTERDAY: On this day in 1946, Brooklyn-born Chuck Connors of the Boston Celtics became the first NBA player to shatter a backboard. It happened during the pre-game warm-up in Boston Garden. Connors also played major league baseball with the Brooklyn Dodgers and Chicago Cubs and starred in the TV series “The Rifleman.”

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Life is about growth. People are not perfect when they’re 21 years old.”

— Basketball Hall of Famer Bill Walton, who was born on this day in 1952


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment