Brooklyn Boro

October 18: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 18, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1925, Eagle columnist Frederick Boyd Stevenson wrote, “The Brooklyn Daily Eagle offers a prize of one hundred and fifty dollars for the best constructive remedy that will check this chaos of crime in the United States … You probably know that the Brooklyn Eagle has been made the medium of an advertising campaign against crime in a series of advertisements now running in this paper and financed by churchmen, laymen, businessmen and public-spirited citizens. These full-page advertisements have been running every week for some time and will continue for several months. They have attracted wide attention not only in this city, but throughout the country, because of the unique method that has been presented to induce the general public to give heed to the crime menace that confronts us all. Many prominent newspapers in the West and South have requested the Eagle to send them mats and copies of the advertisements and the articles appearing in this paper in regard to this campaign, and they have been extensively reproduced. For the purpose of further stimulating the public interest in this most important question that is before us today, the Eagle has offered this prize of one hundred and fifty dollars — not that the money consideration is great, but as a test to determine how many people are seriously thinking of the welfare of their country and are willing to give the best that is within them to serve it in its hour of need.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Eagle reported, “Stocks moved up and down in irregular fashion again today as bears and bulls battled each other. At times the bears had the better of the argument but in some instances those working for higher prices were on top. During the afternoon it looked like a draw with neither side willing to renew the struggle. Stocks which had recovered so sharply late yesterday dropped at the opening today on the unexpected increase of $88,000,000 in brokers’ loans. They rallied and fluctuated sharply between the highs and lows. Utility stocks met with a great deal of selling pressure, the principal target being Consolidated Gas. Montgomery Ward, International Combustion, Curtiss Wright and others declined easily. United States Steel, American Telephone and other pivotal issues held up well. Rails and oils were in most favor. Money was easy at 5 percent but other factors were not so constructive. General Motors sales were lower and some of the income statements for the third quarter were disappointing. Professional traders were pessimistic and there were not many who were very hopeful about higher prices in the near future.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle reported, “MOSCOW (UPI) — Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev stood firm on the Soviet Berlin policy during his three-hour first meeting with new U.S. Ambassador Foy D. Kohler. Khrushchev most likely will repeat Soviet insistence on a peace treaty which would recognize East Germany and call for the withdrawal of U.S. troops. A Tass report of the meeting indicated Kohler and Khrushchev also discussed such problems as Cuba, nuclear testing and Germany. It has been speculated that the Soviet Union plans some drastic move on the German question some time after the U.S. congressional elections Nov. 6. Also, that Khrushchev would attend the United Nations General Assembly in New York to whip up support for his proposals on Germany and to meet President Kennedy.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle reported, “During the final lap of the gubernatorial campaign, Republican Nelson Rockefeller and Democrat Robert Morgenthau will both be zeroing in on a target all politicians consider to be vitally important — Nathan’s Famous in Coney Island. It may seem odd that a hot-dog stand should occupy such a crucial role in our annual election contests, but then Nathan’s is no ordinary hot-doggery. It is the largest, most celebrated and most colorful hot-dog mart in the world and the 8,000,000 succulent wieners it peddles each year are the symbol of the common man’s food and of culinary democracy. Thus, if a candidate wants to be known as a ‘regular fellow’ — and what candidate doesn’t? — it behooves him to be photographed eating a Nathan’s hot dog and perhaps guzzling a Nathan’s orange drink.”

***

Letitia James
Seth Wenig/AP
Freida Pinto
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Pro Football Hall of Famer Mike Ditka, who was born in 1939; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Cynthia Weil, who was born in 1940; “Mork & Mindy” star Pam Dawber, who was born in 1951; “Waiting to Exhale” author Terry McMillan, who was born in 1951; TV director and producer Chuck Lorre, who was born in 1952; International Tennis Hall of Famer Martina Navratilova, who was born in 1956; International Boxing Hall of Famer Thomas Hearns, who was born in 1958; N.Y. Attorney General Letitia James, who was born in 1958; “Timecop” star Jean-Claude Van Damme, who was born in 1960; Pulitzer Prize-winning musician Wynton Marsalis, who was born in 1961; “Blood Ties” star Vincent Spano, who was born in Brooklyn in 1962; “Closer” singer Ne-Yo, who was born in 1979; “Slumdog Millionaire” star Freida Pinto, who was born in 1984; skier and Olympic gold medalist Lindsey Vonn, who was born in 1984; former N.Y. Mets outfielder Yoenis Cespedes, who was born in 1985; “High School Musical” star Zac Efron, who was born in 1987; and WNBA star Brittney Griner, who was born in 1990.

Terry McMillan
Stuart Ramson/AP

***

TOY STORY: Frederick August Otto Schwarz was born on this day in 1836. The native of Germany came to the U.S. in 1856 and opened a toy shop in Baltimore in 1862. He moved the business to Manhattan in 1870 and today it’s the oldest toy store in the country. Schwarz died in 1911 and is buried in Green-Wood Cemetery.

***

WHALE’S TALE: “Moby-Dick” was published on this day in 1851. Herman Melville’s novel about the vengeful Captain Ahab and the whale that crippled him was not popular during his lifetime but has since become one of the most famous books of all time.

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Too many of us are hung up on what we don’t have, can’t have, or won’t ever have.”

— author Terry McMillan, who was born on this day in 1951


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment