Brooklyn Boro

October 3: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 3, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1926, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The extensive use of concrete block, under the strict building code of Coral Gables, which requires that all structures be of masonry construction, is credited by J.P. Yoder, secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, with having minimized the effects of the storm in Coral Gables. Mr. Yoder said: ‘Concrete and reinforced concrete construction of all Coral Gables public and larger buildings as required by municipal building ordinance prevented any great damage to the structures in this city. Coral Gables’ building code requires structures to be built of coral rock, hollow tile or cement block. The last mentioned material comprises 93 percent of materials used in 3,500 buildings within the city limits. All such buildings withstood the terrific brunt of the hurricane without damage with the exception of where windows crashed in or roofs were splintered by flying missiles which let in the rain.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Eagle reported, “ALBANY (A.P.) — Satisfied with the results of his first campaign speaking tour and the state ticket selected yesterday at Rochester, Governor [Al] Smith was back home today looking for a golf partner. His first big task of the presidential drive to line up votes for the Smith-Robinson slate had been completed and he was anxious for a rest, a visit among his numerous pets in the zoo back of the Executive Mansion, and a round or two of his favorite pastime on the nearby Country Club links … Coming down from Rochester yesterday afternoon after attending the Democratic State Convention, Governor Smith told newspapermen that he could not have hoped for a better ticket, with Franklin D. Roosevelt, the man who nominated him for the presidency at Houston, heading the state as gubernatorial nominee … [Smith] spiked reports that Mr. Roosevelt would not have to do the work if elected governor. ‘Of course, that is on its face an absurdity,’ he declared. ‘The real fact is that Frank Roosevelt today mentally is as good as he ever was. Physically he is as good as he ever was. His whole trouble is his lack of muscular control of his lower limbs. But the answer is that a governor doesn’t have to be an acrobat. We do not elect him for his ability to do a double backflip or a handspring.’”

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News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

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ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Eagle reported, “Losses running into the billions were sustained by traders on the Stock Exchange today in another break, which was as sharp as anything yet seen. All sorts of stocks were down from two to 20 points and more than a score were off 10 points or more. Heaviest selling came in the last hour when lowest prices were reached. There was little sign of a rally and only a few stocks resisted the heavy selling pressure. U.S. Steel dropped 10 points from its early high price of 224. General Motors was down three to a record low at 63. American and Foreign Power, Standard Gas and other volatile utility shares were down as much as 20 points. Practically everything sank. There was nothing in the news to account for the drop. Call money was in abundant supply at 6 percent, the lowest rate in weeks. News, while mixed, was not bearish. Professional bears started the selling. Catching of stop-loss orders and the liquidation by nervous speculators added to the deluge.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “Hundreds of economy-minded housewives were on hand at the Fort Greene Retail Meat Market today following news of 10 to 20 percent meat-price slashes and extra clerks have been hired for an expected bigger rush of customers tomorrow. ‘It will be murder here,’ predicted a spokesman for Max Kleinman, manager of the market at 174 Fort Greene Place, where sirloin steak prices tumbled yesterday from 79 cents to 65 cents a pound. Leg of lamb went to 53 from 59 and breast of veal to 20 from 27. Tomorrow’s best-seller undoubtedly will be chopped beef, it was said. This item, formerly 39 cents per pound, has been reduced to 35 cents. The market sells ‘tons’ of ground beef on weekends. The scene of long lines of shoppers during the meat shortage, Fort Greene Market operates its own slaughterhouses. ‘We’ll have plenty for everybody at these prices,’ it was announced. ‘Three more carloads of beef are coming in tomorrow.’”

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Gwen Stefani
Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP
Dave Winfield
Rob Latour/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Apollo 16 lunar module pilot Charles Duke, who was born in 1935; Hockey Hall of Famer and N.Y. Rangers legend Jean Ratelle, who was born in 1940; “The Twist” singer Chubby Checker, who was born in 1941; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Lindsey Buckingham (Fleetwood Mac), who was born in 1949; Baseball Hall of Famer Dave Winfield, who was born in 1951; Baseball Hall of Famer Dennis Eckersley, who was born in 1954; World Golf Hall of Famer Fred Couples, who was born in 1959; “General Hospital” star Jack Wagner, who was born in 1959; No Doubt singer Gwen Stefani, who was born in 1969; “Scream” star Neve Campbell, who was born in 1973; “Game of Thrones” star Lena Headey, who was born in 1973; singer-songwriter India Arie, who was born in 1975; “Creed” star Tessa Thompson, who was born in 1983; former N.Y. Knicks guard Courtney Lee, who was born in 1985; and “Stranger Things” star Noah Schnapp, who was born in 2004.

Lindsey Buckingham
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

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HISTORIC OCCASION: George Bancroft was born in Massachusetts on this day 1800. The historian and statesman served as secretary of the Navy under President James Polk and established the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1845. He also wrote the series, “History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.” He died in 1891.

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CENTURY MARK: On this day in 1922, Georgia Gov. Thomas Hardwick appointed 87-year-old Rebecca Felton to the U.S. Senate seat vacated by the death of Thomas E. Watson. Though only a two-day ad interim appointment, it made Felton the first woman senator. Today, 24 of the 100 U.S. senators are women.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“When the people possess no authority, their rights obtain no respect.”

— historian George Bancroft, who was born on this day in 1800


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