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September 26: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 26, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The anticipated recovery of stock prices got under way today after bears staged a new drive at the motor shares in the morning and checked an incipient rally. Good gains were scattered throughout the list in the afternoon, with the utilities leading. The rumored squeezing of shorts in Radio, U.S. Steel and other issues did not get very far, but in other directions gains were wide enough to suggest some urgent buying by the shorts. Columbian Carbon soared another 20 points. General Electric, Standard Gas and a number of other volatile stocks were up 5 to 10 points at times. The Street for the most part paid little attention to the British bank rate and regarded the change as a threat which was now out of the way. Similarly no attention was paid to the Danish bank rate change although both reflected the increasing demands for credit all over the world.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “That curiosity, morbid and otherwise, is not confined to any country was shown by the disturbing of the usual Sabbath quiet of the village of Glamis, Scotland, on a Sunday preceding the birth there of a daughter to the Duchess of York. The weather was fine, and the inhabitants declared that they could not recall ever having seen so many visitors to the village. Hundreds of private cars and a stream of motor coaches brought people from the surrounding towns, and two char-a-bancs came from Aberdeen, 60 miles away. The visitors gazed at the castle gates and caught glimpses of the castle itself, half hidden in the grounds, which were guarded by a special cordon of police. Some climbed 900 feet to the beacon, where woodmen were keeping watch, ready to fire it as soon as the signal of the birth was given from the castle. Princess Elizabeth had to be confined to the castle grounds because of the number of sightseers and had to forego her little shopping expeditions in the village.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “Plans were laid in Borough Hall today for a mighty Victory Parade Monday afternoon to honor the flag-winning Brooklyn Dodgers. The players themselves — Pete Reiser, Whitlow Wyatt, Dixie Walker, Kirby Higbe, Dolph Camilli, Pee Wee Reese and the rest — will be the center of attraction in the procession through Brooklyn streets. With them and behind them will come bands playing, flags waving and Dodger fans marching by the thousands. And other Brooklyn fans, the planners predicted, will turn out to see and cheer to the number of 500,000 and more. The number of actual paraders, it was estimated, would be about 60,000. Several tentative parade plans were merged when Borough President [John] Cashmore today called a group of representative Brooklyn leaders. At the same time he issued a proclamation making Monday ‘Brooklyn Dodgers Day’ and calling on all citizens to join in the demonstration ‘for Brooklyn’s heroes.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “TAIPEI, FORMOSA, SEPT. 25 (U.P.) — A typhoon today forced Nationalist planes and warships to break off attacks on Communist positions around Amoy for the first time since the ‘vest pocket’ war erupted 23 days ago. The temporary lull in the fighting came as Nationalist Chinese officials predicted the Communists would attempt to seize Nationalist-held coastal islands as a preliminary to an assault on Formosa itself. A spokesman for the Ministry of National Defense said Nationalist warplanes sank seven Communist gunboats in the vicinity of Amoy Friday. But, he said, planes were grounded today by heavy winds and rain. The only action reported at Quemoy, the Nationalist-held island four miles off Amoy, he said, was sporadic duels between Nationalist and Communist artillery. The spokesman said the weather also forced Nationalist warships to halt shore bombardment and take up patrol missions along the coast. Chinese Nationalist Defense Minister David Yui told a defense committee the Nationalist government is confident it could thwart any Red attempt to capture the 37 coastal islands controlled by its forces.”

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Serena Williams
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Christina Milian
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “The Most Interesting Man in the World” star Jonathan Goldsmith, who was born in 1936; “Adam-12” star Kent McCord, who was born in 1942; former “The Weakest Link” host Anne Robinson, who was born in 1944; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bryan Ferry (Roxy Music), who was born in 1945; comic book writer Louise Simonson, who was born in 1946; Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jane Smiley, who was born in 1949; “The Terminator” star Linda Hamilton, who was born in 1956; En Vogue singer Cindy Herron, who was born in 1961; “Little House on the Prairie” star Melissa Sue Anderson, who was born in 1962; sportscaster Jillian Barberie, who was born in 1966; “The Passion of the Christ” star Jim Caviezel, who was born in 1968; Olympic gold medal-winning gymnast Jaycie Phelps, who was born in 1979; singer and actress Christina Milian, who was born in 1981; and tennis champion Serena Williams, who was born in 1981.

Jonathan Goldsmith
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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POET’S CORNER: T.S. Eliot was born in St. Louis, Mo., on this day in 1888. One of the 20th century’s preeminent poets, he worked to modernize contemporary poetic diction so it reflected the rhythm of educated speech. His best-known works include “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (1917), “The Waste Land” (1922) and “Four Quartets” (1945). He died in London in 1965.

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HERE’S THE STORY: “The Brady Bunch” premiered on this day in 1969. The popular sitcom starred Robert Reed as widower Mike Brady, who has three sons and is married to Carol (Florence Henderson), who has three daughters. The show, which ran for five seasons, steered clear of social issues and portrayed childhood as a time of innocence. It spawned a cartoon, a variety series, a sitcom, a short-lived dramatic series and feature films.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“If you aren’t in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?”

— poet T.S. Eliot, who was born on this day in 1888


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