Brooklyn Boro

September 24: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 24, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Stocks were again uncertain today. Several waves of buying and selling swept over the market from time to time and lifted or depressed stocks over a two to five-point range. Most of the leading stocks, like U.S. Steel, American Can, Allied Chemical, and American Telephone and Telegraph, were up two to five points at noonday, but at the beginning of the last hour they had lost all the gains and many were at new low prices for the day. Motor stocks were under steady pressure from the start, and many of them hit new bottom prices for the year. Short covering lifted them slightly occasionally, but new selling again appeared. Utilities were strong in spots, with Columbia Gas, Consolidated Gas and Foreign Power among those to show gains of several points or more. Money was easy at 8 percent and in good supply at that figure and most of the day’s news was cheerful. Selling was attributed in part to investment trusts, the public and bearish professionals. Sentiment in speculative circles was rather mixed as a result of the unsatisfactory trend of prices lately.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “DETROIT — Hungry Hank Greenberg breathed hot on Babe Ruth’s home run record today after having belted out four-masters No. 55 and 56 here yesterday off Earl Whitehill of the Indians. Hank stands three games up on the pace the Bambino set in 1927 when he blasted 60 homers. Detroit has nine games to play. Ruth hit No. 56 in the Yankees’ 148th game. Excluding a tie with St. Louis that will be replayed here next week, yesterday’s second game was Detroit’s 145th of the season.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Russian atomic blast set off an atomic arms race in which American experts said today the Soviets may never catch up. The race for A-bombs between the cold war champions of the East and the West was blasted into the open by history’s ninth atomic explosion, somewhere in Russia. At stake may be the future of civilization. Atomic scientists reported that the Soviets now are about where the United States was at the time of the first A-bomb test explosion at Alamogordo, N.M., in 1945. The U.S. has gone a long way since then. With increasing realization that this country was not caught napping, the capital was beginning today to share the calm with which President Truman yesterday disclosed that America’s atomic monopoly — believed good for another couple of years — had been shattered. Top diplomats said it is possible, but not probable, that Russia wants war. They said our aim, in any event, continues to be establishment of a lasting world peace.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — Five attending doctors reported today that gravely ill King George VI spent a restful night and his condition ‘continues to be as satisfactory as can be expected.’ The bulletin was issued by Buckingham Palace at 11 a.m., some 24 hours after part or all of one of the King’s lungs was removed in an operation. The doctors were keeping vigil over the frail 55-year-old monarch and all members of the royal family were at the palace or their nearby residences. Even the brother whose abdication as King Edward VIII, Dec. 11, 1936, led to the coronation of George VI was in London. The Duke of Windsor arrived on the boat train from France to keep a long-arranged book dinner date marking the publication in Britain of his memoirs. The duke went at once to Marlborough House, the residence of his mother, Queen Mary, now 84. He left behind at his Paris residence his American-born wife for whom he renounced the throne. Other members of the royal family were expected to form a council of state to carry on the King’s duties. It will comprise Queen Elizabeth, Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, the Duke of Gloucester and the Princess Royal. Gloucester is a brother and the Princess Royal a sister of the King.”

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Nia Vardalos
Andy Kropa/Invision/AP
“Mean” Joe Greene
Gene J. Puskar/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include TV commentator Lou Dobbs, who was born in 1945; Pro Football Hall of Famer “Mean” Joe Greene, who was born in 1946; “NYPD Blue” star Gordon Clapp, who was born in 1948; former N.Y. Mets outfielder Hubie Brooks, who was born in 1956; “Hercules: The Legendary Journeys” star Kevin Sorbo, who was born in 1958; “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” star Nia Vardalos, who was born in 1962; former N.Y. Mets outfielder Bernard Gilkey, who was born in 1966; Slipknot founder Shawn “Clown” Crahan, who was born in 1969; “Dark Skies” star Megan Ward, who was born in 1969; Heisman Trophy winner and former NFL running back Eddie George, who was born in 1973; and “The Politician” star Ben Platt, who was born in 1993.

Kevin Sorbo
Matt Sayles/AP

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BENCHMARK: John Marshall was born on this day in 1755. The Virginia native served in the House of Representatives and was secretary of state under President John Adams, who appointed him the fourth chief justice of the U.S. in 1801. Marshall’s court was largely responsible for defining the role of the Supreme Court and basic organizing principles of government in the early years after the Constitution was adopted. He died in 1835.

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EXCITING AND NEW: “The Love Boat” premiered on this day in 1977. Produced by Aaron Spelling, the one-hour comedy-drama series featured weekly guest stars aboard a cruise ship, the Pacific Princess. All stories had to do with finding or losing love. Gavin MacLeod played the ship’s captain, Merrill Stubing, and co-stars included Bernie Kopell, Ted Lange, Lauren Tewes and future U.S. Rep. Fred Grandy. The series ended in 1986 but special TV movies were broadcast in later years.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.”

— author F. Scott Fitzgerald, who was born on this day in 1896


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