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September 17: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 17, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1916, Brooklyn Daily Eagle columnist Frederick Boyd Stevenson wrote, “The street railway strike in New York City, following the threatened general railroad strike in the United States, has forcefully brought out of the labor problem which, in the minds of many students of economics, promises to be the greatest problem in America. A universal clash between capital and labor has been long predicted. Recent events have given cause for the belief that another step has been taken along this path of danger. In the present instance the union insists that the very life of the union itself is at stake. On the other hand, the street railway companies insist upon the legality of individual contracts and the right to handle their own affairs in their own way without interference from outsiders. The men of the street railway companies have organized a union of their own known as the Brotherhood and with the representatives of this   organization only will the employers treat. The whole situation, say the railway officials, grew out of the attempt of the Amalgamated Association of Street Railway Employees to force the employees of the Rapid Transit Company and the employees of the New York Railways Company to join the union organization. By obtaining the signatures of 9,500 out of the 11,700 of the railway employees to two-year contracts with the company and by the organization of the company’s own union, [railroad executive Theodore] Shonts clearly outwitted the leaders of the Amalgamated Association.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Eagle reported, “Stocks moved in uncertain fashion today. Rallies and declines followed each other quickly as money rates advanced and news from Washington told of Federal Reserve Board meetings and possibly adverse action. Despite the uncertainty, a good number of stocks reached record high levels. In the rally which followed the posting of 9 percent for call loans in the early afternoon, Foreign Power, American Power, Public Service and other utilities reached new peak prices. Elsewhere various motor, steel, electrical and specialty stocks displayed no little strength and weakness as the market moved up or down. Outside of the money situation of the Reserve Board meetings, most of the news was of a constructive nature and traders were inclined to be optimistic about the future course of prices. Dividend actions were favorable, new mergers were announced or rumored, and tips were quite frequent.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “Launching of the newest British ocean liner, the Queen Elizabeth, will be detailed in an NBC broadcast set for Tuesday morning, Sept. 27. It will come from Glasgow. Queen Elizabeth, after whom the boat is named, is to make a brief talk.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — America’s delegates were sworn in today for next week’s meeting of the United Nations General Assembly, where an early fight is expected over Red China membership. Acting Secretary of State Walter Bedell Smith presided at the formal swearing-in ceremonies. It was the first time all members of an American delegation to the UN have gathered for the ceremony at the same time. Reports from London said Britain has agreed to a U.S. proposal that the question of admitting Red China to the United Nations should be postponed for the rest of this year. Russia is expected to make a determined bid at the opening session next Tuesday in New York to oust the Chinese Nationalists and seat the Chinese Reds. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, now in Europe, will head the American fight against the Chinese Communist membership issue. The secretary will be on hand in New York the first few days of the assembly following a weekend at his Duck Island, Lake Ontario, retreat to write his UN speech. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. will head the delegation when Mr. Dulles leaves the assembly sessions.”

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Patrick Mahomes
Gregory Payan/AP
Bobby Lee
Dan Steinberg/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Gemini astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, who was born in 1930; Baseball Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda, who was born in 1937; former U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter, who was born in 1939; Basketball Hall of Famer Phil Jackson, who was born in 1945; TV horror hostess Cassandra Peterson, who was born in 1951; comedian Rita Rudner, who was born in 1953; former N.Y. Mets closer John Franco, who was born in Brooklyn in 1960; “Friday Night Lights” star Kyle Chandler, who was born in 1965; rapper and producer Doug E. Fresh, who was born in 1966; “MADtv” star Bobby Lee, who was born in 1971; former N.Y. Knicks forward Rasheed Wallace, who was born in 1974; rapper and singer Flo Rida, who was born in 1979; NHL star Alexander Ovechkin, who was born in 1985; and Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes, who was born in 1995.

John Franco
Greg Allen/Invision/AP

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LAW OF THE LAND: Today is Constitution Day. On Sept. 17, 1787, delegations from 12 states met at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia and voted unanimously to approve the proposed document. Thirty-nine of the 42 delegates present signed it and the convention adjourned after drafting a letter of transmittal to the Congress. The proposed constitution stipulated that it would take effect when ratified by nine states.

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IT’S WITCHCRAFT: “Bewitched” premiered on this day in 1964. The ABC sitcom centered around playful blonde-haired witch Samantha Stephens (Elizabeth Montgomery). Although she promises not to use witchcraft in her daily life, she finds herself twitching her nose in many situations. Co-stars included Dick York and Agnes Moorehead. The last episode aired in 1972.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Men who have a pierced ear are better prepared for marriage — they’ve experienced pain and bought jewelry.”

— comedian Rita Rudner, who was born on this day in 1953


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