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September 3: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 3, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The businessmen of Coney Island today visited the bank, after the biggest day Coney has seen this year. The police estimate that nearly 300,000 persons and 5,000 automobiles visited the nation’s playground yesterday. As early as 3 o’clock, walking on Surf Avenue was almost impossible, the crowd was so great. The beaches, too, were well occupied from the early morning until sundown. The oil that for the past week has been raising havoc with the bathers yesterday took a day off and the bathhouse owners spread the news with unbounded joy … The island was in full glow last night — the last Monday night it will be that way until next season. The lighting was only made possible by agreeing to keep dark Friday.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (A.P.) — The capital was sitting on a volcano today as the first test of strength in the strike of 1,000,000 textile workers was due with a majority of Southern operators opening their cotton mills in defiance of the strikers’ demands. Reports to labor and government offices here pictured many of the mill centers south of Virginia as virtual armed camps, with clashes between strikers and strike-breakers believed certain. National Guardsmen threw armed cordons around the larger mills in South Carolina, where the situation is viewed as the most strained and in which state, with other Southern states, the operators have selected labor’s holiday for its offensive against the big walkout. Police and state troopers were pressed into full-time strike duties in virtually all mill communities below the Virginia line.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “Thomas E. Dewey, Republican gubernatorial nominee, today prefaced a conference with his running mates and State Chairman Edwin F. Jaeckle with an announcement that his drive won’t swing into full speed until ‘sometime in October.’ ‘Election Day is still more than eight weeks away,’ he pointed out at his headquarters at 41 E. 42nd St., Manhattan, adding that he would spend this month mapping out campaign strategy and ‘listening to people with valuable views about state government.’ The conference today, said Mr. Dewey, who plans to spend Labor Day at the Columbia County Fair in Old Chatham, would touch on such things as naming of campaign chieftains to work with his manager, Herbert Brownell Jr., and a ‘general exchange of ideas.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “(U.P.) — Polio cases are running 40 percent below a five-year average in the 217 areas where some 440,000 children were vaccinated against the disease last spring. The children vaccinated were in the six, seven and eight-year-old groups. These groups, along with the five and nine-year-olders, usually account for 50 to 60 percent of all polio cases. The comparative percentages of these statistics compiled by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis match, more or less, but no one should take the matching as anything more than a hopeful indication that the experimental Salk vaccine may have been effective. Dr. Hart E. Van Riper, the foundation’s medical director, refused to comment on the grounds he is an interested party, and anyway it is extremely essential to get a completely scientific evaluation of the vaccine’s worth as a polio preventive. That evaluating is being done at the University of Michigan and it will be next spring, at the earliest, before the Michigan scientists can make their report.”

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Garrett Hedlund
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Kaia Gerber
Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Al Jardine (The Beach Boys), who was born in 1942; “Superman” star Valerie Perrine, who was born in 1943; Grand Funk Railroad drummer Don Brewer, who was born in 1948; “The Sopranos” star Steve Schirripa, who was born in Brooklyn in 1957; “Seinfeld” writer Spike Feresten, who was born in 1964; former NBA Rookie of the Year Damon Stoudamire, who was born in 1973; “Bring It On” star Clare Kramer, who was born in 1974; former NFL defensive end Jevon Kearse, who was born in 1976; “Friday Night Lights” star Garrett Hedlund, who was born in 1984; snowboarder and Olympic gold medalist Shaun White, who was born in 1986; and model and actress Kaia Gerber, who was born in 2001.

Steve Schirripa
Scott Roth/Invision/AP

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U.S.A., U.S.A., PART 1: The flag of the United States was flown in battle for the first time on this day in 1777, at Cooch’s Bridge, Delaware, during the American Revolution. The battle site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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U.S.A., U.S.A., PART 2: The U.S. and Britain signed the Treaty of Paris on this day in 1783, ending the American Revolution. American signatories included John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and John Jay.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“There’s no such thing as quality time; there’s only quantity time.”

— actor Steve Schirripa, who was born on this day in 1957


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