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September 1: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 1, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1874, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Some idea of the amazing number of locusts out west is formed by the fact that on the line of the St. Joseph and Denver railroad, between Oxtail and Beetle, they covered the track two inches deep, and although the engineers put on a powerful head of steam and tried to drive through them, the train was nine hours going 11 miles. On the same road a train pulled out of Seneca on time, but encountering the locusts, was driven back and had to wait until the myriads of insects had crossed the line. As this was in Kansas, the grain crops there are threatened as well as in Minnesota and Iowa. Of the extent of the ravages no present conjecture can be formed, but in the regions occupied by homestead settlers the suffering is severe.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1931, the Eagle reported, “Parochial schools in the Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and Long Island will open a week late, on Sept. 21, Mons. Joseph V.S. McClancy, superintendent of schools of the diocese, announced today. This announcement followed the postponement of opening of city schools until Sept. 22, eight days after schedule. Decision to defer city school opening was made by Health Commissioner [Shirley] Wynne after conference with school officials because of the prevalence of infantile paralysis. Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, falls on Sept. 21. For this reason, city schools will open on the day following. Today Commissioner Wynne appealed to parents not to let their children ‘run wild in the streets’ during the delay in school opening. If this is done, it would ‘be better’ to have the children in classrooms ‘where our doctors can examine them,’ he declared. Postponement of city school opening affects 1,150,000, and in the Brooklyn diocese, 125,000 pupils. This delay will not cause the school session to run into next July, said Dr. George J. Ryan, president of the Board of Education. There is sufficient time between September and the end of next June to catch up the eight days, he indicated. Thirty-six thousand teachers and administrators of city schools will have to report on schedule, however. They will be required to attend forums until classes are resumed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1939, the Eagle reported, “Nazi German troops invaded Poland today by land, sea and air, and brought on the immediate threat of war by Great Britain and France. While German columns were moving into three Polish sectors, Prime Minister [Neville] Chamberlain told a cheering Parliament in London this afternoon that the responsibility for bringing on a world catastrophe was ‘on one man’ — Hitler — and that Britain would stand by her promise to Poland unless Nazi military aggression ceased and German forces were withdrawn at once. A formal British declaration of war was thus withheld, but only temporarily. France, meanwhile, ordered a full mobilization and called its Parliament into session tomorrow, with every indication that that power, too, would take war measures against the ancient Teutonic foe. Adolf Hitler struck swiftly without an ultimatum or a declaration of war. His warplanes simply flew into Poland and bombed at least 17 cities and towns, some reports including Warsaw.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “TOKYO (U.P.) — Representatives of Emperor Hirohito, the Japanese Government and the imperial general staff will sign Allied surrender terms aboard the battleship Missouri in Tokyo Bay between 9 and 9:30 a.m. tomorrow (8 and 8:30 p.m. Brooklyn time today). The entire surrender ceremony formalizing Japan’s first defeat in modern history will last only about a half-hour. However, censorship will not permit publication of descriptions of the ceremony until 11 a.m. (10 p.m. today, Brooklyn time), an hour and a half after it is scheduled to end. In Washington, the White House announced that the surrender ceremony would be broadcast and that President Truman would go on the air immediately afterward to proclaim VJ-Day.”

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Zendaya
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Gloria Estefan
Greg Allen/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Grace and Frankie” star Lily Tomlin, who was born in 1939; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Barry Gibb (Bee Gees), who was born in 1946; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Greg Errico (Sly and the Family Stone), who was born in 1948; TV personality and author Phil McGraw, who was born in 1950; two-time NBA champion Vinnie Johnson, who was born in Brooklyn in 1956; Miami Sound Machine singer Gloria Estefan, who was born in 1957; five-time NBA All-Star Tim Hardaway, who was born in 1966; “Top Chef” host Padma Lakshmi, who was born in 1970; Pro Football Hall of Famer Jason Taylor, who was born in 1974; “Felicity” star Scott Speedman, who was born in 1975; former N.Y. Rangers winger Mats Zuccarello, who was born in 1987; Miss America 2016 Betty Cantrell, who was born in 1994; and “Spider-Man” star Zendaya, who was born in 1996.

Padma Lakshmi
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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FISH STORY: “The Old Man and the Sea” was published on this day in 1952. Ernest Hemingway’s novel about a Cuban fisherman’s battle with a giant marlin won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1953 and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954.

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BURIED TREASURE: The Titanic was found on this day in 1985. Seventy-three years after it sank in the North Atlantic after striking an iceberg, the luxury liner was located by an American-French expedition force led by marine geologist Dr. Robert Ballard. The ship was resting on the ocean floor 12,500 feet down — about 250 miles southeast of Newfoundland, Canada. In July 1986, Ballard returned in an expedition aboard the Atlantis II to explore the ship with underwater robots. Two memorial bronze plaques were left on the deck.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“As an immigrant, I appreciate, far more than the average American, the liberties we have in this country.”

— singer Gloria Estefan, who was born on this day in 1957


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