August 1: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

August 1, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1898, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “They say that [Sen.] Thomas C. Platt is now willing ‘to make or take’ Theodore Roosevelt. That is, he is now willing to have Theodore Roosevelt nominated for governor by the Republican state convention. Why not? Mr. Roosevelt has always been a ‘regular Republican.’ He has always been a machine man. We know that these will be regarded as words of reproach by some and of misdescription by others. But they are true. He never bolted a convention of his party. He never supported an opposition ticket. He never took a less than active part in every state and national campaign since manhood. Incredulity may be excited by these statements. Let examination test them. They will be found liberally true. Mr. Roosevelt’s personality is one thing. His party relationship is another. The machine has more than once stood in front of his ambition. He has never once gone against it as an independent, a reformer, a mugwump or anything of that kind.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “The creation of additional playgrounds in sections of eighty-nine streets in Brooklyn, Manhattan and the Bronx, from which, during specified hours, vehicular traffic will be barred, is provided for in an order issued yesterday by Police Commissioner Enright. The order is effective on Monday morning at 8 o’clock. The streets designated are in the crowded residence sections of the three boros, and were chosen because they can be closed to vehicular traffic without serious interference with the movement of the city’s commerce. It was decided that play streets are not needed in Queens and Richmond because of their rural environments.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “While millions of automobile owners on the eastern seaboard today were checking their gasoline gauges with keener interest than they’ve ever shown before, the following developments drove home to them the seriousness of the announcement that gas stations will be ‘blacked out’ from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. nightly beginning Sunday: 1. Brooklyn: George Dyson Friou, attorney, revealed that Petroleum Coordinator Ickes will set up regional offices throughout the area to enforce the conservation edict and act as ‘suggestion mills.’ 2. Washington: Favorable reaction was seen here on the part of the general public to the conservation decree, although it was pointed out that the order resulted from failure of the public to comply with previous requests for economy.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “A labor economist told President Truman’s Steel Fact-Finding Board today there is serious doubt that the economic recession of the last nine months is a ‘healthy readjustment from the postwar boom.’ Economist Robert Nathan appeared before the board for the United Steel Workers of America, C.I.O., as the board’s hearing into the dispute between the union and the steel industry entered the second week at the Federal Courthouse in Manhattan. Nathan told the board [that] industry generally should grant higher wages. He said the consequent rise in buying power would improve markets for all industry and encourage greater production, which would mean more jobs. Nathan said business has had the initiative for nine months in dealing with the recession but has made little headway. ‘There is nothing healthy in an economic adjustment which brings unemployment to millions of workers, bankruptcy to large numbers of small businesses and widespread curtailment of standards of living,’ Nathan said.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “TOKYO (U.P.) — Gen. Douglas MacArthur returned to his Tokyo headquarters from Taipei tonight after promising Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek that he will help save Formosa from the Chinese Communists. He landed in his big C-54 plane Bataan after a 36-hour flying visit to Formosa. Mrs. MacArthur was waiting at the airport and kissed her husband as he alighted. MacArthur issued a formal statement just before his departure from Taipei saying that he had completed formal arrangements with Chiang ‘for effective coordination between American forces under my command and those of the Chinese [Nationalist] government better to meet any attack which a hostile force might be foolish enough to attempt. Such an attack would, in my opinion, stand little chance for success.’ MacArthur went to Formosa yesterday in his dual capacity as United Nations Military Commander for Korea and Supreme American Commander for the Far East.”

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Jason Momoa
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Chuck D
Joe Furniss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include folk singer Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, who was born in Brooklyn in 1931; former U.S. Sen. Al D’Amato, who was born in 1937; “Weekend at Bernie’s” star Terry Kiser, who was born in 1939; “The Seduction of Mimi” star Giancarlo Giannini, who was born in 1942; blues guitarist and singer Robert Cray, who was born in 1953; “No Myth” singer Michael Penn, who was born in 1958; former N.Y. Knicks forward Kiki VanDeWeghe, who was born in 1958; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Joe Elliott (Def Leppard), who was born in 1959; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Chuck D (Public Enemy), who was born in 1960; rapper and actor Coolio, who was born in 1963; Counting Crows cofounder Adam Duritz, who was born in 1964; Oscar-winning director Sam Mendes, who was born in 1965; Pro Football Hall of Famer Edgerrin James, who was born in 1978; “Game of Thrones” star Jason Momoa, who was born in 1979; and “Foyle’s War” star Honeysuckle Weeks, who was born in 1979.

Joe Elliott
Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

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ALONG CAME A SPIDER: Marvel Comics published Amazing Fantasy #15 on this day in 1962. One story was about nerdy teen Peter Parker, who develops superpowers after he’s bitten by a radioactive spider. The arachnid crimefighter got his own comic book in March 1963 and quickly became the center of a multimedia empire.

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VIDEO GA GA: The all-music video channel MTV premiered on this day in 1981. The first song played was “Video Killed the Radio Star” by the Buggles.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.”

— author Herman Melville, who was born on this day in 1819


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