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Carlina Rivera Secures Major Labor Endorsement from 1199SEIU

July 12, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle Staff
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The largest union to endorse so far in the NY-10 race, 1199 is throwing their support behind Rivera for her proven leadership in putting healthcare workers first, especially throughout the pandemic.

On July 6th, NY-10 candidate Carlina Rivera announced the largest labor endorsement so far in the race with the support of 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, the largest healthcare union in the nation. Later this week, 1199 members will rally with Carlina and the campaign for a volunteer kickoff at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital in Park Slope.

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As Chair of the New York City Council’s Committee on Hospitals in her first term, Rivera worked extensively with 1199 members throughout the city to improve workplace conditions, fight for safe staffing in hospitals, secure adequate resources throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and more.

“1199 members and I have been in the trenches together for years now fighting to improve conditions for healthcare workers, which only became more urgent as COVID-19 wreaked havoc on our city,” said Carlina Rivera, candidate for Congress in NY-10. “They are among the frontline heroes that have taken care of New Yorkers throughout the pandemic, and I’ve been so proud to work with them to make sure they’re taken care of just the same. As the proud daughter of a union member, I know firsthand the life changing impact of a union having your back. It’s why I always look to partner with labor leaders and members to forge solutions to workers’ most pressing issues, and it’s what I plan to keep doing in Congress. I am deeply grateful for 1199SEIU’s support to get there and look forward to continuing our work together.”

“We at 1199 are so proud to support Carlina Rivera for Congress to represent NY-10, and we know from all the work we’ve done together that there’s no one better to represent these communities in Washington,” said Milly Silva, Secretary Treasurer of 1199 SEIU-UHWE. “Carlina is a true labor champion and has fought tirelessly to put healthcare workers first, even before the pandemic. Whether it’s the fight for safe staffing or ensuring our workers have the resources and equipment they need to do their jobs with dignity every day, we can always count on Carlina to fight for our members. We can’t wait to send this workers’ rights champion to continue building on her record in Washington.”

Carlina Rivera and supporters

“I’m thrilled to see Carlina continuing to earn the support she deserves in her run for Congress, and this endorsement from 1199 is a sign of a campaign with serious momentum,” said Nydia Velázquez, Congresswoman for New York’s 7th Congressional District. “I’ve witnessed firsthand the impact Carlina has made working with 1199 members and leadership on pro-worker policies, ensuring adequate resources for our healthcare workers during the pandemic, and moving the needle on safer staffing policies in our hospitals. I know their partnership will continue to deliver the results working New Yorkers need, and I’m excited to have the union’s support for Carlina’s campaign.”

This latest endorsement proves surging momentum for Carlina Rivera’s bid for Congress in a field where she continues to emerge a leading contender. 1199’s announcement of their support follows a long list of endorsements from Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez, Brooklyn Borough President Antonio Reynoso, Council Members Alexa Avilés, Erik Bottcher, and Lincoln Restler, Voters for Animal Rights, CODA LES, UDO, 504 Democratic Club, and several other community leaders, small business owners, and elected officials.

About Carlina Rivera
Carlina Rivera was born and raised in NY-10 on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. She and her sister were raised by a single mother from Puerto Rico, who continues to work as a civilian employee for the NYPD to this day. Secure housing and reliable family income allowed Carlina to thrive, so she went into public service to help other members of her community access housing, services, and opportunity.
Carlina graduated from Marist College with a B.A. in Journalism after attending local district schools her entire life. Beginning her career in afterschool programming at some of New York City’s highest-needs schools, she went on to serve her local community, creating and organizing initiatives for seniors and New Yorkers experiencing homelessness as Director of Programs and Services at Good Old Lower East Side (GOLES), a local non-profit focused on social justice.

After a few years of working for community based organizations and serving on the local community board, Carlina realized her community needed and deserved more, so she ran for City Council and won a crowded six-way primary with over 60% of the vote. She delivered so much to her community during her first term that she won again in 2021 with 74% of the vote.

Carlina Rivera at the 1199 event

Even before serving as an elected official, Carlina has a long history of bringing people together to improve New Yorkers’ lives, resources, and well-being — as a community board member, an organizer, and a key leader on the taskforce that secured funding for East River waterfront resiliency in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. After Sandy, Carlina helped coordinate thousands of volunteers to assist over 10,000 homebound residents as part of a recovery network that still supports families in the community today.

Today Carlina is a member of the New York City Council representing the 2nd Council District, which includes the East Village, Alphabet City, the Lower East Side, Flatiron, Gramercy Park, Rose Hill, Kips Bay, and Murray Hill. She currently chairs the Committee on Criminal Justice and formerly chaired the Council’s Committee on Hospitals during the height of the pandemic. She is a member, and former co-chair, of the Women’s Caucus, and member of the Progressive Caucus as well as the Black, Latino, and Asian Caucus.


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