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June 17: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 17, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1906, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Although what has come to be known as ‘the season’ at the Long Island resorts can scarcely said to be really open yet, there are many cottages at all the places most popular with dwellers in Greater New York, and the number is being augmented daily. Some of the hotels are open and are caring for many patrons, while the bookings at such as have already swung wide their hospitable doors, as well as at those that are yet to open, are such as to warrant the belief that the season of 1906 will be a brilliant one. Long Island’s popularity as a resort will never wane, but is bound to increase as its charms become known to those who are yet in ignorance of them. The number of the latter is diminishing year by year, as the throngs who have spent a delightful season on the island return to tell during the winter of the charms there experienced.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Millions of dollars worth of paper money of a new type will be put into circulation upon the establishment of the Federal Reserve banks within the next few weeks. Under the Federal Reserve bank act, each of the twelve reserve banks will receive advances from the Reserve Board in the form of Federal Reserve notes, a distinctly new sort of paper money. Commercial paper will be the collateral advanced by the various banks as security for these notes. Controller of the Currency Williams has samples of this new paper money now under consideration. At his request, Joseph E. Ralph, director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, prepared notes of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 denominations, and these have been submitted to Secretary McAdoo. It is not likely, however, that the samples will be officially accepted until the members of the Federal Reserve Board have been confirmed by the Senate and can confer with Secretary McAdoo and Controller Williams concerning the new notes. The new $5 note submitted by Mr. Ralph is typical of agriculture. The portrait on the face of the note is Lincoln’s and the back shows a harvesting machine and allegorical figures typical of farming. The $10 note bears a portrait of Cleveland and a manufacturing scene. The $20 note bears Jackson’s portrait and is typical of commerce, having a steamship, train and other mediums of trade on the back. Grant’s picture is shown on the $50 note and Franklin’s portrait adorns the $100 bill. Both of these larger bills are typical of the arts. All the bills will be printed in green ink on the back, while black ink will be used on the faces.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — A Federal Court jury today tried to break a deadlock on whether Mrs. Lolita Lebron, Puerto Rican fanatic, intended to kill when she and three confederates shot up the House of Representatives March 1. The jurors late last night convicted the three male members of the terrorist band, including a Brooklynite, of shooting with intent to kill. But the seven men and five women were unable to reach unanimous agreement in the case of the woman. Earlier, all four defendants had been convicted of the lesser charge of assault with a deadly weapon. The three men — Rafael Cancel Miranda, who had given his address as 125 South 1st St., Brooklyn, confessed ringleader of the assault plot; Andres Figueroa Cordero and Irving Flores Rodriguez — received the jury’s final verdict by exchanging wan smiles. When the foreman pronounced the word ‘guilty,’ Mrs. Lebron, pale and worn after the two-week trial, turned to a court matron and said: ‘I don’t see why they don’t convict me, too.’ The men face up to 75 years imprisonment for the conviction on the 10 assault counts. Mrs. Lebron faces up to 50 years for the five counts on which she has already been convicted.”

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Venus Williams
Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP
Kendrick Lamar
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, who was born in 1943; “Copacabana” singer Barry Manilow, who was born in Brooklyn in 1943; author and commentator Linda Chavez, who was born in 1947; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Gregg Rolie (Santana/Journey), who was born in 1947; former Cincinnati Reds star Dave Concepcion, who was born in 1948; former “Saturday Night Live” star Joe Piscopo, who was born in 1951; former Islanders general manager Mike Milbury, who was born in 1952; Dead Kennedys singer Jello Biafra, who was born in 1958; “As Good as it Gets” star Greg Kinnear, who was born in 1963; fashion designer Tory Burch, who was born in 1966; former “Saturday Night Live” star Will Forte, who was born in 1970; tennis superstar Venus Williams, who was born in 1980; and rapper Kendrick Lamar, who was born in 1987.

Barry Manilow
John Salangsang/Invision/AP

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UPHILL CLIMB: The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought near Charleston, Mass., on this day in 1775. More than 1,000 British redcoats and 450 American colonists were killed or wounded. Famously, the order was given, “Don’t fire until you see the whites of their eyes.”

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STOLEN TRUST: On this day in 1972, five White House operatives were arrested for breaking into Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. An investigation led to threats of impeachment against Republican President Richard Nixon, who resigned Aug. 9, 1974.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Misfits aren’t misfits among other misfits.”

— Barry Manilow, who was born in Brooklyn on this day in 1943


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