May 23: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 23, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1871, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The New York Academy of Medicine have manfully come out against the evil and prevalence of abortion, and make the text of their resolutions a complimentary and appropriate tribute to City Judge Gunning S. Bedford, of New York, for his severe and summary sentencing of two malpractitioners brought in guilty before him. It is notable and refreshing to recognize that professional bodies of men, and in this instance most appropriately of doctors, record themselves in denunciation of this awful crime against life and society. Judge Bedford, too, in this and in other sentences, as well as every other judge who makes himself a terror to evildoers, is entitled to the praise of them that do well. Too many inducements in these venal times cannot be extended to upright and fearless officers to do and continue well, nor can too much advertisement be given to their firmness and uprightness, until it ceases to be exceptional.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON, MAY 22 (U.P.) — The Office of Defense Transportation tonight cut truck, bus and taxicab gasoline mileage in the Eastern gasoline shortage area 40 percent effective at 12:01 a.m. Monday. The value of ‘A,’ ‘B’ and ‘C’ gasoline rations for passenger car owners was not changed. ODT officials estimated that the slash in commercial vehicle mileage will save a net of 20,000 barrels of gasoline daily. This saving, officials said, will be added to the 30,000 barrels a day which the OPA estimates will be conserved through the ban on pleasure driving imposed on passenger cars. The decision to cut mileage of commercial vehicles, it was said, followed lengthy consultation with the OPA and other government agencies in an effort to prevent a breakdown in essential transportation in the East.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “Brig. Gen. Frank T. Hines, veterans administrator, disclosed today that the site for a veterans’ hospital in Brooklyn has been chosen. ‘Brooklyn will have its hospital right quick,’ he said. Last week, surveyors from General Hines’ office were in Brooklyn inspecting six possible sites. The principal area surveyed was the 20-acre plot at Fort Hamilton facing Dyker Beach, which has been the choice of most veterans groups and other interested parties. General Hines made his statement at a luncheon of the Disabled American Veterans at the Hotel Commodore at which a campaign to raise $10,000,000 was launched. It is expected that the new hospital will be authorized and built during 1946.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “The most important step the United States can take in international affairs is to ratify the Atlantic Pact, according to United States Senator Irving M. Ives. Speaking at the 29th annual memorial exercises of the Queens American Legion yesterday in Richmond Hill High School, Senator Ives said, ‘In my judgment, if we do not have the Atlantic Pact, we are more likely to have war than if we do have it.’”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Gil Hodges, longtime favorite of Brooklyn fans while he was playing for the Dodgers and more recently the Mets, was named manager of the Washington Senators yesterday. The surprise announcement came late yesterday afternoon only two weeks after the 39-year-old first baseman was put on the Mets’ disabled list because of a knee injury … Hodges, who has been involved in rumors that he would someday take over as the Mets’ field general ever since he came to the club via the National League draft last year, appeared in only 11 games for the Mets this season and batted a disappointing .227. ‘We have nothing but good wishes for Hodges,’ was the way Met president George Weiss said good-by to the popular slugger who was given his outright release by the Mets to accept the managerial position. ‘Our relationship has always been cordial and we did not want to stand in his way of taking advantage of an opportunity which may not have occurred again.’”

***

Ryan Coogler
Phil McCarten/Invision/AP
Maxwell
Seth Wenig/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Suddenly Susan” star Barbara Barrie, who was born in 1931; “Dynasty” star Joan Collins, who was born in 1933; “Murphy Brown” star Charles Kimbrough, who was born in 1936; Basketball Hall of Famer Rod Thorn, who was born in 1941; N.Y. Mets manager Buck Showalter, who was born in 1956; “Tuesdays with Morrie” author Mitch Albom, who was born in 1958; “Orange is the New Black” star Lea DeLaria, who was born in 1958; “The Price Is Right” host Drew Carey, who was born in 1958; “The Walking Dead” star Melissa McBride, who was born in 1965; “Pretty Wings” singer Maxwell, who was born in Brooklyn in 1973; “Hands” singer Jewel, who was born in 1974; “Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler, who was born in 1986; and NFL player Aaron Donald, who was born in 1991.

Buck Showalter
Sue Ogrocki/AP

***

FULL ATTENTION: Franz Anton Mesmer was born on this day in 1734. The German physician used magnetism and hypnotism to treat disease — a therapeutic movement known as “mesmerism.” He died in 1815.

***

WINGS OF CHANGE: Edward Norton Lorenz was born in Connecticut on this day in 1917. The influential mathematician, meteorologist and father of chaos theory formulated the idea of the “butterfly effect” — that a small, seemingly insignificant act or disturbance can actually have huge consequences. His famous 1972 talk, “Predictability: Does the Flap of a Butterfly’s Wings in Brazil Set Off a Tornado in Texas?” helped popularize the notion. He died in 2008.

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“I’ll tell you what, if we don’t get off to a good start, you’ll see cotton uniforms.”

— NY Mets manager Buck Showalter, who was born on this day in 1956


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment