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May 16: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 16, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1922, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “ODESSA — Fear of starvation in the Ukraine, once regarded as the richest farming country in the world, has become so acute that thousands of peasants are abandoning everything they possess and flocking to the cities, where they hope to eke out an existence until all danger of crop requisition by the Soviets has passed. Hope for better crops this summer seems to have been lost. Merchants here who formerly sold agricultural machinery in the Ukraine are making no efforts to dispose of their stock. ‘There will be no crops to speak of this year, and next season it will be worse,’ they say. The Ukraine, commonly called the ‘granary of Europe,’ produced nearly 20,000,000 tons of wheat and cereals in pre-war years. Its annual yield of potatoes averaged 6,000,000 tons. In 1914 it marketed 27,000,000 head of horned cattle, 8,100,000 horses and 6,300,000 pigs. It also exported coal, iron and manganese, dairy products and blooded horses. The Ukraine, twice as large as the British Isles and with a pre-war population of 40,000,000, is fast becoming desolate waste, according to the refugees.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “What price knowledge? Pretty expensive, thinks 16-year-old Leonard Heyman of 1459 Bedford Ave. He was arraigned this morning in Municipal Term, Magistrate’s Court, charged with violating the park ordinances in that he plucked leaves and twigs for his nature collection. Leonard, a Boy Scout, went to Prospect Park on Sunday afternoon to complete his collection of leaf specimens which would entitle him to a nature emblem award. He had started making his collection, having plucked several leaves, when he was served with a summons by Patrolman John Tormey of the Prospect Park station, who was touring the park in a police car. He received the summons on the West Drive near the 3rd St. entrance. Magistrate James A. Blanchfield suspended sentence when Heyman was arraigned in Municipal Term Court today. Louis Fribourg, Scoutmaster of the troop, and a lawyer, told the court he thought the police should ‘use discretion’ in the issuance of a summons for such violations. ‘There certainly was no criminal intent here,’ he said.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — President Truman today asked the deadlocked miners and soft coal operators to submit their dispute to arbitration. The president announced his request after talking briefly with John L. Lewis, president of the mine union, and Charles O’Neill, representing the operators. They told him their negotiations had collapsed and that further sessions would be ‘useless.’ Mr. Truman said he then proposed arbitration and asked them to report back to him late this afternoon. Mr. Truman said they left to discuss his proposal with their respective organizations. Mr. Truman announced his proposal at a brief, unscheduled news conference. Unusually serious and openly worried, Mr. Truman said the nation was in ‘desperate straits’ because of the work stoppage in coal. He said the step he took today was another in a long series of government efforts to ease the coal crisis.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “The eyes don’t have it, when it comes to television problems with children. Take it from Dr. Joseph Mandelbaum, Brooklyn ophthalmologist: Children’s eyes may get tired watching Hopalong Cassidy, but no permanent harm will ensue. In an article written for the publication of the parents and teachers of the Brooklyn Community School, 196 New York Ave., Dr. Mandelbaum says: ‘The distortions and inadequacies of the images can be mentally trying, and the subject matter both mentally and emotionally trying.’ But that’s all. Eyes may get tired all right, and some people may find redness appearing on the whites, but the fatigue is only ‘temporary.’ Don’t drag Junior away from Captain Video on that account. ‘It would be as sensible to say that, because the muscles of the arms and legs will tire after most types of outdoor play that children indulge in, physical exercise is harmful and should be avoided,’ he points out. ‘In the question of the effect of television on children, the eyes need not be considered. Other questions are much more real — such as the effects on their emotions and intellects, and what alternative activities are being curtailed.’”

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Janet Jackson
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Megan Fox
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include King Crimson founder Robert Fripp, who was born in 1946; “Mamma Mia!” star Pierce Brosnan, who was born in 1953; Baseball Hall of Famer Jack Morris, who was born in 1955; “Urban Cowboy” star Debra Winger, who was born in 1955; Olympic gold medal-winning runner Joan Benoit, who was born in 1957; “St. Elmo’s Fire” star Mare Winningham, who was born in 1959; “The Kids in the Hall” star Kevin McDonald, who was born in 1961; former NBA player John Salley, who was born in Brooklyn in 1964; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Krist Novoselic (Nirvana), who was born in 1965; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Janet Jackson, who was born in 1966; Pro Football Hall of Famer Thurman Thomas, who was born in 1966; New Edition singer Ralph Tresvant, who was born in 1968; “Bones” star David Boreanaz, who was born in 1969; political commentator Tucker Carlson, who was born in 1969; “Beverly Hills, 90210” star Tori Spelling, who was born in 1973; and “Transformers” star Megan Fox, who was born in 1986.

Tucker Carlson
AP photo/file

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ALL THAT JAZZ: Woody Herman was born in Milwaukee on this day in 1913. The legendary jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, singer and bandleader cut his teeth playing with bands led by others in Chicago. He formed his first band in 1936 and for the next 50 years continued to form and front talented ensembles that played in a variety of jazz styles — from blues and improvisation to bop and jazz-rock. He died in 1987.

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OSCAR, OSCAR, OSCAR: The first Academy Awards ceremony was held on this day in 1929. About 270 people attended a dinner at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel at which awards were given in 12 categories. The silent film “Wings” won Best Picture. A committee of only 20 members selected the winners that year. By the third year the entire membership of the Academy voted. The ceremony was first telecast in 1953.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“You don’t have to hold on to the pain to hold on to the memory.”

— Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Janet Jackson, who was born on this day in 1966



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