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April 27: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

April 27, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1861, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “The news received by telegraph, and published in full in another column, is of the most important character. It is reported that an armistice is about to be asked for by Gen. Cameron on behalf of the United States. This seems very improbable, but it is less so when coupled with the fact that the rebels are said to be in the immediate neighborhood of the Capitol. A hopeful reaction in favor of Union has manifested itself in parts of Maryland and Virginia, but on the other hand, the secessionists are displaying extraordinary vigor. Gen. Harney, it is said, has been arrested by Virginia troops, as he was on his way to the Federal Capitol to offer his services to his country. Doubt has been expressed as to his loyalty, but probably without just foundation.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Eagle reported, “During the influenza epidemic in southern California, the spectators and players at a ball game presented a most ludicrous appearance. A photograph in the May Popular Mechanics Magazine shows them swathed in ‘flu’ masks, even the umpire shouting his decisions through one. A fine of $50 was the penalty for removing the masks, even when the game called for enthusiastic rooting.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Senate Judiciary Committee meets today to decide in what form and with what recommendations it will report President Roosevelt’s reorganization bill to the Senate. The committee is divided closely and it will be the first formal test of strength between those opposing and supporting the president. The 18-member committee’s secret session began at 10:30 a.m. It will discuss procedure first and probably consider a motion by Senator Frederick Van Nuys (D., Ind.) to split off the section of the bill enlarging the Supreme Court from the part relating to reorganization of the lower courts. ‘I believe that my motion will be approved but I am not at all sure it will be voted on this morning,” Van Nuys, who opposes the bill, said. ‘I will press for a vote, however, before any other motions are considered.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “Mayor [William] O’Dwyer today took a slap at teachers who ‘encourage’ the students’ strikes as the Board of Education voted to add $150 and $250 annual raises for teachers to the city’s record-breaking 1950-1951 budget. To a spokesman on behalf of the teachers, the Mayor retorted that far from ‘getting less than day laborers,’ as she had charged, the city’s teachers were getting from $13 to $29 a day. School principals are getting $55 a day, he said. He declared that elementary school teachers have had $1,528 in pay increases, including the $150 just voted them, since Jan. 1, 1946, while high school teachers in the same period have had their pay checks upped by $1,592. ‘What are they screaming about?’ he asked. Teachers, he added, have a responsible job in that they share with parents the ‘responsibility for molding children’s character,’ but he pointed out that he saw no evidence of any great character on the part of school children during ‘the last two days.’ He cited destruction of railings around City Hall by student demonstrators, the throwing of firecrackers in front of policemen’s horses and noises in front of hospitals.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Barbra Streisand, now only 20, is a singer who’s definitely on the rise. She has a big, clear voice with an ability to really put a song across, be it slow or swingy, torchy or funny. In this, her debut album, she’s been given an extremely broad range of music to sing. It’s a rather strange assortment, too, running the gamut from ‘Cry Me a River,’ ‘A Sleepin’ Bee’ and ‘A Taste of Honey’ to ‘Keepin’ Out of Mischief Now’ and — of all things! — ‘Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1885, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “At today’s meeting of the Board of Alderman, Ald. Collins offered the following resolutions: Resolved, That the Mayor and Common Council of the City of Brooklyn hereby tender to General U.S. Grant their congratulations upon this his 63rd birthday and the assurance of their deep and earnest sympathy in his recent and trying illness, which we humbly trust the goodness of Divine Providence may entirely remove and prolong an existence not only illustrious but endeared to our common country and the civilized world. Resolved, That the City Clerk be and he is hereby directed to transmit the foregoing to General Grant this day.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Secretary of State Dean Acheson told Congress today that Russia’s aggressive action makes the North Atlantic treaty and the arms-for-Europe program essential for world peace. ‘The sense of insecurity prevalent in Western Europe,’ he told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, ‘has come about through the conduct of the Soviet Union.’ As the committee opened public hearings on the North Atlantic Pact, Acheson said that Russia’s conduct in Eastern Europe has ‘cynically violated’ the United Nations charter. His appeal for ratification of the treaty was made as the United States and Russia planned a secret meeting which might lead to an end of the Berlin blockade and easing of the tension in Western Europe. But Acheson’s words made it unmistakably clear the administration wants the North Atlantic treaty and the arms-for-Europe program despite any Soviet conciliatory moves. Acheson said the rights to self-determination by the people of Eastern Europe have been ‘extinguished by force or threats of force’ by Russia.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “The Board of Estimate today approved a record-breaking 1949-50 city executive budget of $1,197,434,294, an increase of $18,407,363 over previous estimates, and sent it to the City Council for approval. It was the fourth record budget in the [William] O’Dwyer regime and the third billion-dollar budget in city history. Despite its size, it was considered an austerity budget, as requests of many departments had to be turned down. The increase over previous estimates was due to a $17,689,103 grant of New York State aid to education — a grant made by the state after the original budget had been prepared. The state funds will provide money for new school buildings, additions and modernization of buildings, 150 additional elementary school teachers, 26 kindergarten teachers, four special teachers for cerebral palsy cases, 30 teacher-librarians and extra teachers for child guidance and vocational guidance. The increase which came from the city’s treasury will provide for three branch libraries. The budget now goes to the City Council, which must pass on it by May 22 and can reduce it but cannot increase it.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (UPI) — The cost of living rose one-tenth of one percent to a record last month despite a drop in food prices, the Labor Department reported yesterday. Arnold Chase, assistant commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, said increases in prices of used cars, clothing and certain housing items offset a drop of four-tenths of one percent in food prices. The result was a rise in the March index to 106.2 percent of the 1957-59 base period. This meant it took $10.62 to buy the same goods and services that could have been purchased for $10 during the base period. The food index stood at 104.6 percent, compared with 105.0 in February. This meant a market basket of food that cost $10 during the 1957-59 period now costs $10.46. The average weekly earnings of workers rose more than 50 cents during March, however, taking some of the sting out of the increased cost of living.”

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Lizzo
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Jenna Coleman
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “La Dolce Vita” star Anouk Aimee, who was born in 1932; drumming legend Jim Keltner, who was born in 1942; B-52’s founder Kate Pierson, who was born in 1948; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Ace Frehley (Kiss), who was born in 1951; radio host Larry Elder, who was born in 1952; Basketball Hall of Famer George Gervin, who was born in 1952; former N.Y. Jets coach Herman Edwards, who was born in 1954; “Morning Train” singer Sheena Easton, who was born in 1959; U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, who was born in 1969; “Doctor Who” star Jenna Coleman, who was born in 1986; “Truth Hurts” singer Lizzo, who was born in 1988; and 2020 World Series MVP Corey Seager, who was born in 1994.

Ace Frehley
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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NORTHERN STAR: Ulysses S. Grant was born 200 years ago today. The Ohio native graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1843. President Abraham Lincoln promoted him to lieutenant general in command of all the Union armies in March 1864. On April 9, 1865, Grant received Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House, which ended the Civil War. He served two terms as the 18th president of the U.S. (1869-1877). He died July 23, 1885 and is buried in Riverside Park in Manhattan.

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OSCAR PARTY: Jack Klugman was born 100 years ago today. The Philadelphia native is best-known for his role as sportswriter Oscar Madison on ABC’s “The Odd Couple” (1970-75) and as the title character on NBC’s “Quincy, M.E.” (1976-83). In the 1990s, he was praised for continuing his career despite the effects of throat cancer. He died in 2012.

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EXPLORERS CLUB: Ferdinand Magellan died 500 years ago today. The native of Portugal is usually thought of as the first man to circumnavigate the earth, but he died before completing the voyage; thus, his co-leader, Basque navigator Juan Sebastian de Elcano, became the world’s first circumnavigator. The westward, round-the-world expedition began Sept. 20, 1519, with five ships and about 250 men. Magellan was killed by natives on the Philippine island of Mactan.

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INSTANT MESSAGE: Samuel Morse was born on this day in 1791. The American artist and inventor conceived the idea of the electromagnetic telegraph in 1832. With financial assistance approved by Congress, the first telegraph line in the U.S. was constructed between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Md. The first message tapped out by Morse from the Supreme Court chamber at the U.S. Capitol building on May 24, 1844 was, ‘What hath God wrought?’”

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

‘In every battle, there comes a time when both sides consider themselves beaten. Then he who continues the attack wins.
— Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, who was born on this day in 1822


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