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April 5: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

April 5, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Twenty-five thousand hearts thumped with joy, twenty-five thousand pairs of feet pounded the concrete floor and twenty-five thousand voices roared with delight — the day of days had at last arrived. Bill Dahlen’s Superbas made their debut in Ebbets Field this afternoon, crossing bats with Frank Chance’s Yankee Americans in an exhibition game, and the baseball season of 1913 was ushered in. Crowds? Well, all roads in Greater New York led to Brooklyn’s new ballpark on this fine day, and joy reigned supreme in the hearts of every blessed fan for miles around. They came early, too — no less than 10,000 an hour and a half before the game was called.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “TEHRAN (U.P.) — Russia and Iran early today signed a treaty establishing a joint Russo-Iranian oil company and providing for evacuation of the Red Army by May 5. The signing came less than 12 hours after the United Nations Security Council had closed its books on the Iranian complaint against the Soviets. The treaty was announced by Premier Ahmed Ghavam at 4 a.m. today (8 p.m. last night Brooklyn time) after 48 hours of almost continuous negotiation with Soviet Ambassador Ivan Sadchikov. The composition of the joint Soviet-Iran oil company was not immediately announced but Russia had proposed that she hold a 51 percent stock interest and Iran 49 percent. The corporation would exploit the oil resources of northern Iran. It was not immediately indicated whether the Security Council action on Iran had affected the course of negotiations here.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The North Atlantic Treaty for military cooperation against armed attack probably will be ratified, but there was some doubt today that Congress would go all the way in backing it up with arms for Europe. Senator Tom Connally (D., Texas) called the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, of which he is chairman, into executive session today to consider treaty hearing procedure. He said the hearings could begin April 11 if the administration is ready to proceed at that time. He warned that ratification must not be delayed ‘too long.’ But ratification is weeks or months distant. The Senate may be summoned finally into special session to consider the treaty after its other business is finished. Doubt about the treaty had to do with what is called implementation. To implement it, President Truman will ask Congress to authorize a $2,000,000,000 or more spending program to help arm Europe against possible Soviet attack. Opposition to that spending program is developing. It is based in some cases on tax-economy grounds; in others the argument against arming Europe is that such action needlessly would inflame the Kremlin.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “President James M. Power of the Board of Elections left Brooklyn today for Albany to argue before the Court of Appeals that the recently adopted state reapportionment is unconstitutional. His trip was of political importance to Brooklyn, it was reported. If the law is declared unconstitutional, then new Senate districts might be drawn up, and there was a possibility of adoption of a new plan for ‘gerrymandering’ Brooklyn to create two Republican districts. That plan is fathered by Republican County Leader John R. Crews. Brooklyn has no Republican state senators at present. Mr. Power was prepared to argue in favor of the unconstitutionality of the reapportionment law, adopted last November, on the ground that new state Senate boundary lines passed through two buildings in Queens. If the law is declared unconstitutional, then two courses might be followed. Old boundary lines might be retained and, secondly, Governor [Thomas] Dewey might call a special legislative session to adopt new lines. The law recently adopted cuts Brooklyn Assembly districts from 24 to 22. It was reported that Mr. Power would try to make as good a showing as possible to strengthen his hand in his current race for the Brooklyn Democratic leadership.”

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Pharrell Williams
Scott Roth/Invision/AP
Lily James
John Locher/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include filmmaker Roger Corman, who was born in 1926; “Sleeping Beauty” star Mary Costa, who was born in 1930; “Law & Order” star Michael Moriarty, who was born in 1941; “Barney Miller” star Max Gail, who was born in 1943; former U.S. Rep. Pete King, who was born in 1944; Segway inventor Dean Kamen, who was born in 1951; “The X-Files” star Mitch Pileggi, who was born in 1952; blues musician Larry McCray, who was born in 1960; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Mike McCready (Pearl Jam), who was born in 1966; “I Don’t Want to Wait” singer Paula Cole, who was born in 1968; record producer Diamond D, who was born in 1968; “Happy” singer Pharrell Williams, who was born in 1973; “This Is Us” star Sterling K. Brown, who was born in 1976; “Captain America” star Hayley Atwell, who was born in 1982; and “Pam & Tommy” star Lily James, who was born in 1989.

Sterling K. Brown
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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ALL IN THE FAMILY: “Married… With Children” premiered on this day in 1987. The raunchy Fox sitcom was meant as an antidote to Cosby-style family shows. It starred Ed O’Neill as boorish, luckless shoe salesman Al Bundy; Katey Sagal as his big-haired, sex-starved wife Peggy; Christina Applegate as airheaded daughter Kelly; and David Faustino as hormone-driven son Bud. The show ended in 1997.

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SLICE OF LIFE: Today is National Deep Dish Pizza Day, which was created to celebrate Chicago deep dish pizza and the efforts by UNO Pizzeria & Grill to bring it to the entire U.S. For more information, visit www.unos.com.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Never believe the first thing you hear.”

— former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who was born on this day in 1937


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