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January 28: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

January 28, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1916, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — The explosion of a bomb in the Senate Chamber could have caused no more astonishment this afternoon than the nomination of Louis D. Brandeis of Boston to be associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, to succeed the late Justice [Joseph] Lamar. The president’s selection caused the utmost astonishment. The name of Brandeis had never been whispered in connection with the Supreme Court vacancy outside of the inner circles of the White House. A fight against the conformation of Brandeis is assured from the attitude of several senators, who were surprised out of their calm by the news. There is Democratic as well as Republican opposition. What seems certain is a protracted struggle in the Judiciary Committee, to which the nomination has been referred. In the course of this fight it is predicted that every detail of Mr. Brandeis’ career as a lawyer will be thoroughly gone into. It may be weeks before the nomination is reported back to the Senate. Brandeis is regarded as the most emphatic radical ever nominated to the Supreme bench.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “ALBANY — A bill to penalize indifferent voters by making them subject to a $25 fine if they fail to go to the polls and cast ballots was introduced in the Legislature today by Assemblyman Max H. Turshen, Brooklyn Democrat. The bill is modeled on the Australian law applying to all persons eligible to vote, and would permit the imposition of the penalty if they fail to register and also if, after having registered, they fail to vote in November in local, state and national elections. ‘The ballot is such a vital and important function, as well as a duty, of every citizen that it is high time that all persons who are citizens and qualified to vote shall be required to do so by law,’ Mr. Turshen said in offering his bill. ‘If this bill becomes law, everyone will be conscious of his civic duties and obligations and will take a real interest in politics and in the affairs of government. It will make for a more representative and real democracy.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “MOSCOW (U.P.) — The Soviet government prohibited Russians from talking to foreigners today and designated Foreign Minister V.M. Molotov’s foreign office as the sole clearing house for contact with the outside world. The only exemptions to the blanket decree were the Ministry of Foreign Office, and such working people as clerks, waiters and ticket sellers. The clerks and waiters, however, were warned they must restrict their conversations with foreigners to the ‘limits of their usual functions,’ on penalty of prosecution under the criminal code. Punishment was not specified. Any Soviet official other than those in the Foreign Ministry approached personally by a foreign diplomat must not discuss the question asked. Answers must be limited to an explanation that the inquiry must be directed to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The decree was passed Dec. 16 by order of the Supreme Soviet to tighten state security. It was published yesterday in the official gazette. The decree provides that all representations made by foreign nations or individuals, regardless of their nature, must be handled only by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.I.) — The United States said today it made more space progress than Russia in 1962. The claim was made in a report to Congress by President [John] Kennedy which said 1962’s achievements augured ‘a record of even greater net advance’ this year. A section of the report summarized by Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, Chairman of the National Aeronautics and Space Council, had this to say about the U.S.-Russian space race: ‘The United States generated a greater rate of space progress than did the USSR (in 1962) … the United States was successful in putting more than 50 satellite payloads into earth orbit, the USSR more than 15.’ The report went on to say, however, that the Russians wound up the year ‘still ahead in size and total weights placed into orbit, in the thrust of their rocket engines, and in the development of the art of rendezvousing (coupling of craft) in space.”

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Daunte Culpepper
Ann Heisenfelt/AP
Alan Alda
Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “M*A*S*H” star Alan Alda, who was born in 1936; San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich, who was born in 1949; “Hee Haw” star Barbi Benton, who was born in 1950; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Billy Bass Nelson (Parliament-Funkadelic), who was born in 1951; pastor and author Rick Warren, who was born in 1954; “Major Tom” singer Peter Schilling, who was born in 1956; “The Shawshank Redemption” director Frank Darabont, who was born in 1959; “Raised on Promises” singer Sam Phillips, who was born in 1962; “I Will Remember You” singer Sarah McLachlan, who was born in 1968; rapper and record producer Rakim, who was born in 1968; humorist and actor Mo Rocca, who was born in 1969; Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Amy Coney Barrett, who was born in 1972; former major league outfielder Jermaine Dye, who was born in 1974; former NFL quarterback Daunte Culpepper, who was born in 1977; NSYNC member Joey Fatone, who was born in Brooklyn in 1977; and “Lord of the Rings” star Elijah Wood, who was born in 1981.

Amy Coney Barrett
Susan Walsh/AP

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SEAL OF APPROVAL: The Great Seal of the United States was authorized on this day in 1782. Congress resolved that the secretary of Congress should “keep the public seal, and cause the same to be affixed to every act, ordinance or paper, which Congress shall direct.”

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AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY: The Space Shuttle Challenger exploded on this day in 1986, 74 seconds into its flight and about 10 miles above the earth. Seven astronauts were killed, including teacher Christa McAuliffe, who was to have been the first ordinary citizen in space. Intermediate School 187 in Dyker Heights was renamed the Christa McAuliffe School in her honor.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Space is going to be commonplace.”

— teacher and astronaut Christa McAuliffe, who died on this day in 1986


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