Brooklyn Boro

November 23: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

November 23, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A public hearing on a proposed reduction of the telephone rates between the principal boroughs of the Greater City to a uniform rate of 5 cents per five-minute talk will be held before the Public Service Commission of the Second District tomorrow at 10 o’clock a.m. in the assembly room on the eleventh floor of the Metropolitan Building, 1 Madison avenue, Manhattan. Large delegations from civic associations in the different boroughs will be present to offer arguments in favor of the reduced rates. The hearing has been granted on the complaint of M.H. Winkler of 90 Wall street, Manhattan, who alleges that although a regular subscriber to the telephone service of the New York Telephone Company, his firm has been charged 10 cents per call of five minutes’ duration between the Wall street office and 231 Hudson avenue, Brooklyn — points less than two miles apart.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON, Nov. 22 — Confirmation of the view that the spiral nebulae which appears in the heavens as whirling clouds are in reality distant stellar systems, or ‘island universes,’ has been obtained by Dr. Edwin Hubbell of the Carnegie Institution’s Mount Wilson Observatory through investigations carried out with the observatory’s powerful telescopes. The number of spiral nebulae, the observatory officials have reported to the institution, is very great, amounting to hundreds of thousands, and their apparent sizes range from small objects, almost starlike in character, to the great nebulae in Andromeda, which extends across an angle some three degrees in the heavens, about six times the diameter of the full moon. ‘The investigations of Dr. Hubbell were made photographically with the 60-inch and 100-inch reflectors of the Mount Wilson Observatory,’ the report said, ‘the extreme faintness of the stars under examination making necessary the use of these great telescopes. The revolving power of these instruments breaks up the outer portions of the nebulae into swarms of stars, which may be studied individually and compared with those in our own system.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “We have been hearing a good deal of talk and we have been reading a good deal of printed matter concerning a proposed college or a proposed university of Brooklyn. So far it has been all wind! Next Tuesday there is to be a conference of distinguished gentlemen at the University Club in Brooklyn to further discuss this question, so vital to the future of Brooklyn. May it not be all wind again, dying down into a gentle zephyr, leaving Brooklyn calm and serene and content to let her ambitious youths get their education where and the best they may. So far all the talk and all the printed matter and all the wind has been based on the one idea that Brooklyn needs a college. We all know the need of it. Why not shift the propaganda and make the slogan: ‘Brooklyn College — How to Get It!’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “Back in the city after a two-week Bahama vacation, Mayor-elect [Robert] Wagner today was preparing to round out the roster of commissioners and advisers who will form his cabinet when he moves into City Hall Jan. 1. Wagner returned to his desk as Manhattan borough president this morning but may meet later today with Tammany leader Carmine G. DeSapio and Bronx Democratic leader Charles A. Buckley to discuss forthcoming appointments … The Wagners arrived at 2 p.m. yesterday at Pennsylvania Station, where they were met by their sons, Duncan, 6, and Robert, 10. At a brief press conference, Wagner disclaimed any ambition to run for governor next year. He also declined to express any preference between Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr. and Averell Harriman as potential candidates for that office.”

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Miley Cyrus
Chris Pizzello/AP
Robin Roberts
Evan Agostini/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former baseball manager Jack McKeon, who was born in 1930; Oscar-winning screenwriter Robert Towne, who was born in 1934; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher Luis Tiant, who was born in 1940; comedy writer Bruce Vilanch, who was born in 1948; Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer, who was born in Brooklyn in 1950; “Mandolin Rain” singer Bruce Hornsby, who was born in 1954; “Good Morning America” anchor Robin Roberts, who was born in 1960; actor and director Danny Hoch, who was born in Brooklyn in 1970; former N.Y. Knicks center Vin Baker, who was born in 1971; “Talking Dead” host Chris Hardwick, who was born in 1971; actor and musician Page Kennedy, who was born in 1976; former N.Y. Mets infielder Justin Turner, who was born in 1984; and “Hannah Montana” star Miley Cyrus, who was born in 1992.

Charles Schumer
Patrick Semansky/AP

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WHAT’S UP, DOC?: “Doctor Who” premiered on British TV on this day in 1963. Traveling through time and space, the Doctor and his companions found themselves in mortal combat with creatures such as the Daleks. The series aired until 1989 and attracted a huge cult following when it debuted in the U.S. in 1975. A new version of the series began in 2005.

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BY THE NUMBERS: Today is Fibonacci Day, which celebrates the Fibonacci sequence in mathematics: a string of numbers where each number is the sum of the preceding pair of numbers. In the American shorthand of expressing dates, Nov. 23 is 11/23, and 1+1=2; 2+1=3. Leonardo Fibonacci (1170-1240) described the sequence in his 1202 treaties Liber abaci.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“If things get too much for you and you feel the whole world’s against you, go stand on your head. If you can think of anything crazier to do, do it.”

— comedian Harpo Marx, who was born on this day in 1888


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