Brooklyn Boro

November 22: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

November 22, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “NEW HAVEN, CONN., Nov. 21 (A.P.) — Harvard’s football juggernaut crushed the Yale eleven by a score of 36 to 0 in the Blue ‘bowl’ here this afternoon while 71,000 spectators watched the gridiron rout in stupefied amazement. The Crimson machine rushed up and down the field almost at will, scoring in every one of the four periods of play and, when the sixty minutes of battle had elapsed, had succeeded in rolling up the largest number of points ever registered against an Eli eleven. With the exception of the 1885 Yale victory of 48 to 0, it was the greatest score ever made in the thirty-four games played since 1875. The one-sided score fails to give the slightest inkling of the thrilling scope of the play, of the remarkable strategy and individual brilliancy with which the game fairly bristled. Surrounded by more than a third of a mile of towering tiers of humanity, the two elevens struggled back and forth the length of the gridiron, every second or third play bringing the thousands to their feet, so intense was the excitement and spectacular the play.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN (AP) — The United States has presented a new note to Germany asking formal assurance that the decree of ousting Jews from business enterprises, part of the Nazi regime’s sweeping anti-Jewish campaign, does not apply to Jews holding American citizenship. The note was presented to the Foreign Office late yesterday, it was disclosed today, as Nazi plans for extending the anti-Jewish campaign through the winter are developed. The American communication said the Washington government assumed that the decree did not apply to American citizens and requested a reply as to whether this assumption was correct. Propaganda Minister Paul Joseph Goebbels and other Nazi officials have stated specifically that foreign Jews did not come under the decree. At the same time, Nazi concentration camps swelled with new arrests today and a ‘stigma’ was placed on Jews, United Press said. The press asserted that the anti-Semitic campaign would be introduced shortly in Slovakia as an autonomous province of Czechoslovakia. The ‘Nuremberg Jew laws’ will be adopted there.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “The District Attorney’s investigation of last week’s Billy Fox-Jake LaMotta fight continued full speed ahead today, although LaMotta has been suspended from the ring indefinitely by the New York State Athletic Commission. District Attorney Frank S. Hogan, conducting an inquiry separate from that of the commission, is seeking to discover whether any crime was committed in connection with the fight. LaMotta, never previously knocked out, suffered a technical knockout in the fourth round at Madison Square Garden under circumstances that made sports writers question the honesty of the fight. Hogan was expected to recall LaMotta’s manager, Al Silvani, for further questioning either today or Monday. Silvani was questioned at length yesterday in Hogan’s office. The commission will order the 20th Century Sporting Club to withhold purses of both fighters — about $23,000 each — until the District Attorney and Grand Jury of New York have completed their separate investigation of the bout.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “HOLLYWOOD (U.P.) — Hollywood has a lady Santa Claus this year — with flaming red hair. Susan Hayward is urging every movie queen she knows and all the housewives she can find to climb on her ‘gift lift’ bandwagon and send Christmas presents to soldiers in Korea. She’s been campaigning for a month and already she’s drummed up 20,000 gifts. But she needs 80,000 more. ‘There are 100,000 United Nations troops fighting that war,’ the Brooklyn-born film actress said. ‘I want every one of them to have at least one package to unwrap on Christmas Day.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “The Dodgers didn’t select any players today in the baseball draft meeting at the Hotel Biltmore but lost two outfielders, Roberto Clemente and Glenn Gorbous, from their Montreal farm. Pittsburgh selected Clemente, Cincinnati picked Gorbous … Clemente, a bonus player signed by the Dodgers, was a surprise selection by the Pirates, who had first pick. He batted .257 this year at Montreal.”

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Billie Jean King
Evan Agostini/AP
Scarlett Johansson
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” star Terry Gilliam, who was born in 1940; former Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Roy Thomas, who was born in 1940; Space Shuttle astronaut Guion Bluford, who was born in 1942; International Tennis Hall of Famer Billie Jean King, who was born in 1943; N.Y. Mets President Sandy Alderson, who was born in 1947; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Tina Weymouth (Talking Heads), who was born in 1950; “Mad About You” star Richard Kind, who was born in 1956; “Halloween” star Jamie Lee Curtis, who was born in 1958; “Shutter Island” star Mark Ruffalo, who was born in 1967; singer and actor Tyler Hilton, who was born in 1983; “Black Widow” star Scarlett Johansson, who was born in 1984; and media personality Hailey Bieber, who was born in 1996.

Jamie Lee Curtis
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

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SECOND TO NONE: Abigail Smith was born on this day in 1744. The native of Weymouth, Mass., was the wife of John Adams, second president of the U.S., and the mother of John Quincy Adams, the sixth president. An intelligent woman interested in politics and current affairs, she was a prodigious letter writer and an adviser to her husband. She died in 1818.

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TERROR IN TEXAS: President John F. Kennedy was assassinated on this day in 1963. The 35th president was gunned down by Lee Harvey Oswald, who fired at Kennedy’s limousine from the Texas School Book Depository in downtown Dallas. Oswald was arrested at a movie theater a few hours later and was shot to death by nightclub owner Jack Ruby on Nov. 24.

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A LITTLE RESPECT: Rodney Dangerfield was born 100 years ago today. The Long Island native began his career as a stand-up comedian in the 1960s and became famous for his self-deprecating one-liners and his catchphrase, “I don’t get no respect!” He starred in a string of hit movies in the 1980s, including “Caddyshack,” “Easy Money” and “Back to School.” He died in 2004.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“My wife and I were happy for 20 years. Then we met.”

— comedian Rodney Dangerfield, who was born on this day in 1921


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