Brooklyn Boro

November 3: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

November 3, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A feature of the inquiry into the responsibility for the Brighton Line disaster will be to determine to what extent Mayor [John] Hylan was informed of the intention of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers to call the strike which so crippled the line that the green motorman, Edward Anthony Lewis, 25 years of age, was sent out with a train in the rush hour period. The news of the strike came as a great surprise to the officials of the B.R.T., as well as the members of the Public Service Commission. The mandate of the Federal Labor Board that the company should reinstate the 29 men who had been dismissed for joining the union was issued on Tuesday. The Public Service Commissioners supposed, of course, that President [Timothy S.] Williams would obey the order. Williams made no move to do so. His excuse was that the men did not apply for reinstatement. In the meantime, the Brotherhood made no complaint to the Public Service Commission that Williams was not carrying out the orders of the Taft-Walsh finding. Instead, L.G. Griffing, assistant grand chief of the order, was reported to be conferring regularly with Mayor Hylan, who is a member of this order. On Thursday the order to strike came. Now it is charged that Hylan knew of the intention of the Brotherhood to precipitate a strike. It is asserted at the Public Service Commission that Hylan made no move to prevent this procedure.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “The Fusion leaders began winding up their campaign today supremely confident that nothing can stop Fiorello LaGuardia’s march to City Hall after the citizens’ march on Madison Square Garden last night. That rally was not only the climax of the Fusion campaign but, to LaGuardia’s advisers, it was the big final test of the campaign. Fully 25,000 persons had jammed their way into the huge arena an hour before the rally got under way and, according to Police Commissioner [James S.] Bolan, another 50,000 were lined up outside the Garden all the way down to 6th Ave. It was a one-man crowd. The Fusion leaders and minor candidates were all given rousing receptions when they stepped up before the battery of microphones during the early stages of the rally to take their fling at the [Joseph] McKee and Tammany forces, but the crowd wanted LaGuardia. When he finally entered the arena at 10:25 and marched down the center aisle to the platform at the north end of the building, the crowd went mad. Everybody was on their feet waving banners, placards, posters, handkerchiefs, newspapers and anything else they could grab hold of. Hundreds hopped up and down shouting at the top of their lungs. From the balcony, confetti, slips of paper and torn newspapers poured down into the arena in a steady stream.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “Voters went to the polls today to select the city’s 102nd mayor and other top officials amid indications that the turnout would be higher than the predictions of some political observers who feared the slimmest vote total in a municipal election in 20 years. By noon — six hours after the polls opened — about 40 percent of the 779,00 eligible Brooklyn voters had cast their ballots at 1,374 polling places. This was higher than expected by that hour. With fair skies as an added inducement, it was expected that as many as 2,100,000 of the 2,396,099 registered voters would turn up before the polls shut down at 7 p.m. Aside from picking a new mayor, the voters were selecting members of the Board of Estimate and City Council, as well as borough-wide judicial and other officials. At stake in Brooklyn, in addition to borough president and nine councilmen, were the posts of Supreme Court justice, county judge, district attorney, three Municipal Court justices and one assemblyman. Nine proposed amendments to the state Constitution — the largest number in many years — were also up for consideration. Supporters of Robert F. Wagner Jr., Democratic mayoralty candidate, eyed the cloudless skies and predicted the ‘Wagner weather’ would produce a total vote giving the Democratic slate a better than 500,000 plurality.”

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Kendall Jenner
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Dennis Miller
Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Marjorie Prime” star Lois Smith, who was born in 1930; former Democratic presidential nominee Mike Dukakis, who was born in 1933; singer-songwriter Sonny Rhodes, who was born in 1940; “Gorky Park” author Martin Cruz Smith, who was born in 1942; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher Ken Holtzman, who was born in 1945; “To Sir with Love” singer Lulu, who was born in 1948; former heavyweight champion Larry Holmes, who was born in 1949; Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour, who was born in 1949; actress and comedian Roseanne Barr, who was born in 1952; former “Saturday Night Live” star Dennis Miller, who was born in 1953; former N.Y. Giants quarterback Phil Simms, who was born in 1955; former N.Y. Mets reliever Armando Benitez, who was born in 1972; and model and TV personality Kendall Jenner, who was born in 1995.

Phil Simms
Evan Agostini/AP

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TROUBLED WATERS: On this day in 1906, the Second International Radio Telegraphic Conference, meeting in Berlin, proposed a new wireless distress signal: SOS. After its use during the sinking of the Titanic in 1912, SOS became the standard distress signal at sea. Though it hasn’t been used as a maritime distress signal since 1999, SOS is still a widely recognized code.

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TOUGH AS NAILS: Charles Bronson was born 100 years ago today. The Pennsylvania native was one of 15 children and was working in the coal mines by age 16. He discovered acting after a stint in the Army and appeared in a string of hits that included “The Magnificent Seven” (1960), “The Great Escape” (1963), “The Dirty Dozen” (1967) and “Death Wish” (1974). He died in 2003.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Audiences like to see the bad guys get their comeuppance.”

— actor Charles Bronson, who was born on this day in 1921


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